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  • May 27, 2015
  • 06:40 AM
  • 3 views

Some Birth Control Pills Have Slightly Higher Risk Of Venous Thromboembolism

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Yana Vinogradova, Research Fellow Division of Primary Care School of Medicine University of Nottingham Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Combined oral contraceptives are an effective method of … Continue reading →
The post Some Birth Control Pills Have Slightly Higher Risk Of Venous Thromboembolism appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Yana Vinogradova, Research Fellow. (2015) Some Birth Control Pills Have Slightly Higher Risk Of Venous Thromboembolism. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 27, 2015
  • 06:32 AM
  • 2 views

Soy Supplement Did Not Improve Asthma Symptoms

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Lewis J. Smith, MD Professor of Medicine and Associate Vice President for Research Northwestern University and the Feinberg School of Medicine Chicago, IL 60611 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main … Continue reading →
The post Soy Supplement Did Not Improve Asthma Symptoms appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Lewis J. Smith, MD. (2015) Soy Supplement Did Not Improve Asthma Symptoms. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 27, 2015
  • 06:23 AM
  • 2 views

Masters Of Magnetism: A Bio-Hacker's Story

by Raymond Vermeulen in United Academics

Magnetic superpowers are now possible by implanting a tiny magnet in your body.... Read more »

Hameed, J.; Harrison, I.; Gasson, M.N.; Warwick, K. (2010) A novel human-machine interface using subdermal magnetic implants. Cybernetic Intelligent Systems (CIS). DOI: 10.1109/UKRICIS.2010.5898141  

  • May 27, 2015
  • 06:18 AM
  • 3 views

New Optical Tool May Identify Patients At High Risk Of Recurrent Prostate Cancer

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gabriel Popescu PhD Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering & Bioengineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology Urbana, IL 61801 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post New Optical Tool May Identify Patients At High Risk Of Recurrent Prostate Cancer appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gabriel Popescu PhD. (2015) New Optical Tool May Identify Patients At High Risk Of Recurrent Prostate Cancer. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 27, 2015
  • 04:07 AM
  • 7 views

Supply Chain vs. Supply Chain Competition

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

Many theory-testing efforts in our field are made by borrowing theories from other fields (e.g., transaction cost economics or resource-based theory), adapting them to a supply chain context and deriving hypotheses that are eventually tested statistically. By doing so, we have reached a lot! But we also need our own theories. For example, several years […]... Read more »

Rice, J.B., & Hoppe, R.M. (2001) Supply Chain vs. Supply Chain: The Hype . Supply Chain Management Review, 5(5). info:other/

  • May 27, 2015
  • 03:08 AM
  • 11 views

Predicting the onset of schizophrenia?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"A lower level of inflammatory response indicated by PTX3 [pentraxin-3] might be implicated in developing schizophrenia."That was the primary conclusion reported by Natalya Weber and colleagues [1] (open-access here) who "tested preonset serum specimens from 160 US military service members who were later diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and 160 matched controls without psychiatric disorders."PTX-3 by the way, is a compound of some note when it comes to the concept of inflammation, residing in the same family as a better known inflammatory-related compound, C-reactive protein (CRP) (see here). The difference between CRP and PTX-3 seems to be down to CRP being a 'short' pentraxin and PTX-3 being a 'long' one.Weber et al assessed levels of PTX-3 in "first available serum specimens" of 160 military personnel who were "later diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder" (n=80 respectively) and compared them with 160 matched controls. As per other work by authors on the Weber paper [2], using military cohorts has some significant advantages when it comes to potential biomarker work in this area (see here). They reported that: "PTX3 levels among subjects with schizophrenia were significantly lower... than the levels among their paired controls" thus indicating that prior to the onset of schizophrenia, PTX-3 levels might be something to watch for risk of developing the condition. The authors even went as far as to say that: "a level of PTX3 below the median (0.6 ng/ml) was associated with an OR [odds ratio] of 3.0 (CI, 1.6–5.7)" when it came to risk of subsequent schizophrenia.This is interesting data which, as the authors point out, is strengthened by "including the follow-up of an initially disease-free population with subsequent complete and reliable case/control ascertainment" alongside the collection of biological samples "years before disease onset". Military personnel are screened and screened over their time serving, thus making this population about as valuable to research as all those archived newborn bloodspot cards that I'm so interested in (see here). The authors do caution that their results may not be entirely generalisable to the population at large as a result of their 'captive audience' (how many civvies spend their days like military personnel?) but the strengths of the study perhaps outweigh the limitations.The idea that the immune system and the orchestration of its arsenal of compounds might be perturbed when it comes to a behavioural/psychiatric condition like schizophrenia is by no means a new idea (see here for example). That being said, science is still fumbling around trying to make sense of the idea that immune function / inflammation might impact on something like schizophrenia and the specific hows and whys of the relationship. Weber et al do speculate on what their results might mean as per comments that: "Long-lasting or temporal lack of PTX3 could potentially impact pathogen recognition, activation, and orientation of the adaptive immune response and/or antibody production." Further: "Impairment of any of these functions, particularly those where PTX3 plays its unique role, could lead to a vulnerability to the neurotropic pathogens associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder." Part of those 'neurotropic pathogens' must surely include the body of work referring to a possible role for Toxoplasma gondii in relation to some schizophrenia (see here).Interestingly also the authors talk about how their findings might relate to the issue of autoimmunity and how their findings might be contributory to immune system "derailment into a dysregulated state of autoimmune activation and damage." As per my discussions on autism and autoimmunity (see here for example) I do think there is a lot more to see in this particular area with schizophrenia also in mind (see here), perhaps also mediated by some interesting connections to the human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) among other things. And yes, before you ask, HERVs have been implicated in cases of schizophrenia and perhaps even with the words 'molecularly mimicry' and 'superantigen' in mind [3].More research in this area please.Music: Björk - Hyperballad.----------[1] Weber NS. et al. Predictors of the Onset of Schizophrenia in US Military Personnel. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2015 May;203(5):319-24.[2] Niebuhr DW. et al. Association between bovine casein antibody and new onset schizophrenia among US military personnel. Schizophr Res. 2011 May;128(1-3):51-5.[3] Brodziak A. et al. The role of human endogenous retroviruses in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Med Sci Monit. 2012 Jun;18(6):RA80-8.----------Weber NS, Larsen RA, Yolken RH, Cowan DN, Boivin MR, & Niebuhr DW (2015). Predictors of the Onset of Schizophrenia in US Military Personnel. The Journal of nervous and mental disease, 203 (5), 319-24 PMID: 25919381... Read more »

Weber NS, Larsen RA, Yolken RH, Cowan DN, Boivin MR, & Niebuhr DW. (2015) Predictors of the Onset of Schizophrenia in US Military Personnel. The Journal of nervous and mental disease, 203(5), 319-24. PMID: 25919381  

  • May 27, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 7 views

2 Out of 3 Is Bad: Starter, Disability, and Poor Core Endurance

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A college football player was 5.3 times more likely to have an injury during a season if he was a starter, had poor core endurance, and reported more low back disability. Assessing for these things during your preseason screening can help identify at-risk individuals who may benefit from injury prevention programs.... Read more »

  • May 26, 2015
  • 08:15 PM
  • 21 views

Voice of China on the move

by Alexandra Grey in Language on the Move

It’s a weeknight at the Sydney Town Hall, an ornate 19th century building in the city centre. Almost everyone bustling in the entryway is of Chinese extraction, except the ushers (and me). They’re all ages, and as I pour inside … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 26, 2015
  • 08:07 PM
  • 2 views

Ultrasound Able To Reposition and Facilitate Passage Of Kidney Stones

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Michael Bailey, Ph.D. Senior Principal Engineer Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Urology University of Washington Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Bailey: Ultrasonic propulsion … Continue reading →
The post Ultrasound Able To Reposition and Facilitate Passage Of Kidney Stones appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Michael Bailey, Ph.D., Senior Principal Engineer, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Urology, & University of Washington. (2015) Ultrasound Able To Reposition and Facilitate Passage Of Kidney Stones. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 26, 2015
  • 06:42 PM
  • 2 views

More Adults Homebound Than In Nursing Homes

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.co Interview with: Katherine Ornstein, PhD MPH Assistant Professor Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Institute for Translational Epidemiology Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY 10029 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post More Adults Homebound Than In Nursing Homes appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.co Interview with: Katherine Ornstein, PhD MPH, Assistant Professor, & Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine. (2015) More Adults Homebound Than In Nursing Homes. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 26, 2015
  • 05:00 PM
  • 2 views

2-3 Cups of Coffee Daily Linked To Lower Odds Of Erectile Dysfunction

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: David S. Lopez, Dr.P.H., M.P.H. Assistant professor University of Texas Health School of Public Health Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Lopez: Coffee, and its most studied component, … Continue reading →
The post 2-3 Cups of Coffee Daily Linked To Lower Odds Of Erectile Dysfunction appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: David S. Lopez, Dr.P.H., M.P.H. (2015) 2-3 Cups of Coffee Daily Linked To Lower Odds Of Erectile Dysfunction. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 26, 2015
  • 04:39 PM
  • 2 views

Not All Biologics For Psoriasis Carry Same Risk Of Serious Infections

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Robert E Kalb, M.D. Clinical Professor of Dermatology State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Buffalo Medical Group, P.C. Buffalo, NY 14221 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post Not All Biologics For Psoriasis Carry Same Risk Of Serious Infections appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Robert E Kalb, M.D., Clinical Professor of Dermatology, & State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. (2015) Not All Biologics For Psoriasis Carry Same Risk Of Serious Infections. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 26, 2015
  • 04:14 PM
  • 3 views

Molecule May Help Ovarian Cancer Patients Overcome Chemotherapy Resistance

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Wei Zhang, Ph.D., Professor Department of Pathology Director, Cancer Genomics Core Lab University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston, Texas 77030 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. … Continue reading →
The post Molecule May Help Ovarian Cancer Patients Overcome Chemotherapy Resistance appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Wei Zhang, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Pathology, Director, Cancer Genomics Core Lab, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, & Houston, Texas 77030. (2015) Molecule May Help Ovarian Cancer Patients Overcome Chemotherapy Resistance. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 26, 2015
  • 03:43 PM
  • 2 views

Plant-Based Vegan Diet May Improve Diabetic Neuropathy Pain, Lower Body Weight

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ulka Agarwal, M.D. California State University, East Bay Student Health and Counseling Services Hayward, CA MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Agarwal: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy affects 60 percent of … Continue reading →
The post Plant-Based Vegan Diet May Improve Diabetic Neuropathy Pain, Lower Body Weight appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ulka Agarwal, M.D. California State University, East Bay, Student Health and Counseling Services, & Hayward, CA. (2015) Plant-Based Vegan Diet May Improve Diabetic Neuropathy Pain, Lower Body Weight. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 26, 2015
  • 03:21 PM
  • 22 views

Can monies spent globally on journal subscriptions be completely transitioned to an OA business model to free the journals?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The recent rapid growth in open access publishing, and the clear benefits that open access presents to society as a whole leads to the question: can all subscription based scientific journals in the world be transitioned to open access in a sustainable way? Is there enough money currently in the system for such a transition, and would there be any economic impact? A recent eye-opening study published by the Max Planck Digital Library delves into this issue and provides some very concrete answers based on real expenditures in subscriptions and on the real costs of open access services. … Read More →... Read more »

SCHIMMER, R., GESCHUHN, K.K., & VOGLER, A. (2015) Disrupting the subscription journals’ business model for the necessary large-scale transformation to open access. MPG. PuRe. info:/10.17617/1.3

  • May 26, 2015
  • 02:19 PM
  • 2 views

Aflatoxins From Food May Increase Risk Of Gallbladder Cancer

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Catterina Ferreccio, MD, MPH School of Medicine Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Santiago, Chile Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Ferreccio: In Chile, gallbladder cancer (GBC) is the 2nd highest … Continue reading →
The post Aflatoxins From Food May Increase Risk Of Gallbladder Cancer appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Catterina Ferreccio, MD, MPH, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, & Santiago, Chile. (2015) Aflatoxins From Food May Increase Risk Of Gallbladder Cancer. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 26, 2015
  • 01:38 PM
  • 27 views

Babies can think before they can speak

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Two pennies can be considered the same — both are pennies, just as two elephants can be considered the same, as both are elephants. Despite the vast difference between pennies and elephants, we easily notice the common relation of sameness that holds for both pairs. Analogical ability — the ability to see common relations between objects, events or ideas — is a key skill that underlies human intelligence and differentiates humans from other apes.... Read more »

  • May 26, 2015
  • 01:30 PM
  • 20 views

Researchers find essential fats for brain growth

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

New research has proved that certain special fats found in blood are essential for human brain growth and function. The two studies showed that mutations in the protein Mfsd2a causes impaired brain development in humans. Mfsd2a is the transporter in the brain for a special type of fat called lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) — composed of essential fatty acids like omega-3. These studies show, for the first time, the crucial role of these fats in human brain growth and function.... Read more »

  • May 26, 2015
  • 12:35 PM
  • 2 views

Unrecognized Carriers of Genetic Variants May Have Serious Medical Issues

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with : Prof. Alexandre Reymond Director, Center for Integrative Genomics University of Lausanne Lausanne Switzerland MedicalResearch : What is the background for this study? Prof. Reymond: Though a subset of recurrent DNA copy number variants (differing numbers of copies of … Continue reading →
The post Unrecognized Carriers of Genetic Variants May Have Serious Medical Issues appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with : Prof. Alexandre Reymond. (2015) Unrecognized Carriers of Genetic Variants May Have Serious Medical Issues. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 26, 2015
  • 10:18 AM
  • 17 views

Conduct Disorder as a Substance Abuse Risk Factor

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

In this series of research reviews on conduct disorder several important findings are evident.Conduct disorder (CD) commonly evolves into adult antisocial personality disorderConduct disorder in children often presents along with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and learning problemsCD in childhood and adolescence raises risk for alcohol, drug and nicotine dependence.Margaret Sibley and colleagues recently published a study of CD and ADHD and later initiation and escalation of the use of alcohol, cigarettes and cannabis.In her study, 113 children with ADHD were assessed between the ages of 5 and 18 years of age. A control group of 65 children without ADHD were similarly assessed during this developmental period.Twelve percent of the childhood ADHD later met criteria for a diagnosis of CD. This contrasts with only 1.5% of the control group. Also noteworthy was the high rate of oppositional defiant disorder in the ADHD group (59%) compared to only 5% of the control group.Significant differences emerged in substance use. These key findings included the following:ADHD adolescents were more likely to have ever smoked a cigarette (47% v 28%) and were much more likely to be daily smokers (27% v 6%).ADHD adolescents were not more likely not more likely to have ever tried marijuana (53% v 51%) but were more likely to use on at least a weekly frequency (23% v 8%).There were no differences in the ADHD group compared to controls in ever use of alcohol or frequent drinkingMaternal drinking in early childhood was the strongest predictor of adolescent alcohol useThe authors also found another important finding:"escalating CD symptoms in childhood were viewed as a mediator of the relationship between ADHD and cigarette and marijuana use."The authors noted in the longitudinal data analysis that increasing ADHD symptom endorsement predicted more CD symptoms. More CD symptoms was the strongest predictor of later substance use.The take home message for clinicians is early identification and treatment of ADHD in children is important. Early identification and treatment of ADHD holds the promise for modifying later CD and substance use morbidity.This is an important study teasing out some of the issues in ADHD/CD overlap and later substance use risk. Readers with more interest in this topic can access the free full-text manuscript by clicking on the PMID link in the citation below.Graphic figure is an original created by the author using Canva.Follow the author on Twitter @WRY999Sibley MH, Pelham WE, Molina BS, Coxe S, Kipp H, Gnagy EM, Meinzer M, Ross JM, & Lahey BB (2014). The role of early childhood ADHD and subsequent CD in the initiation and escalation of adolescent cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use. Journal of abnormal psychology, 123 (2), 362-74 PMID: 24886010... Read more »

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