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  • April 17, 2014
  • 10:39 AM
  • 12 views

Cheap, Abundant, Low-Toxic Photocatalyst Discovered

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A research group at Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) led by the principal researcher Hideki Abe and the senior researcher Naoto Umezawa at the NIMS’s Environmental Remediation Materials Unit discovered a new photocatalyst, Sn3O4, that uses sunlight to produce hydrogen from water.... Read more »

Manikandan, M., Tanabe, T., Li, P., Ueda, S., Ramesh, G., Kodiyath, R., Wang, J., Hara, T., Dakshanamoorthy, A., Ishihara, S.... (2014) Photocatalytic Water Splitting under Visible Light by Mixed-Valence Sn O . ACS Applied Materials , 6(6), 3790-3793. DOI: 10.1021/am500157u  

  • April 17, 2014
  • 09:39 AM
  • 12 views

What’s the Answer? (new Biostars interface)

by Mary in OpenHelix

BioStars is a site for asking, answering and discussing bioinformatics questions and issues. We are members of the community and find it very useful. Often questions and answers arise at BioStars that are germane to our readers (end users of genomics resources). Every Thursday we will be highlighting one of those items or discussions here […]... Read more »

Parnell Laurence D., Lindenbaum Pierre, Shameer Khader, Dall'Olio Giovanni Marco, Swan Daniel C., Jensen Lars Juhl, Cockell Simon J., Pedersen Brent S., Mangan Mary E., & Miller Christopher A. (2011) BioStar: An Online Question . PLoS Computational Biology, 7(10). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002216.g002  

  • April 17, 2014
  • 09:26 AM
  • 5 views

April 17, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

The endoplasmic reticulum and humans have quite a bit in common. Both are dynamic and constantly changing, but both also need something to ground and stabilize them. Maybe I’m reading too much into the beauty of the ER, but the image today is from a paper that only fuels my fascination. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a large, complex membrane-bound organelle that spreads throughout the cell and hosts the synthesis, folding, and sorting of membrane and secretory proteins. This network is ........ Read more »

Joensuu, M., Belevich, I., Ramo, O., Nevzorov, I., Vihinen, H., Puhka, M., Witkos, T., Lowe, M., Vartiainen, M., & Jokitalo, E. (2014) ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c-regulated dynamic actin filament arrays. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 25(7), 1111-1126. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E13-12-0712  

  • April 17, 2014
  • 09:14 AM
  • 18 views

What Do You Want to Hear First: Good News or Bad News?

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

As it turns out, our answer to this question is different depending on whether we’re the one delivering the news or we’re the one receiving the news. If we’re delivering the news, we’re more likely to want to lead with … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 17, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 12 views

A poor excuse for removing a peer-reviewed publication

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

I became disenchanted with the idea of e-books when Amazon reached into scores of Kindles and removed copies of (of all possible books) 1984 and Animal Farm. The notion that a major company had the power to deny access to any content they deemed problematic simply presented too many visions of reactive, totalitarian control.

I never considered that those very concerns might apply to the publishers of scientific research, who – in this age of online-only publications – have the pow........ Read more »

  • April 17, 2014
  • 07:49 AM
  • 13 views

Cannabis use and structural changes in the brain

by Robb Hollis in Antisense Science

“One or two spliffs a week could mess up your brain” – Metro, 16 April 2014

Spark your interest? This headline caught the eyes of the Antisense team, so we chased down the original article in the Journal of Neuroscience and took a closer look!

Cannabis is the most commonly used illegal drug in the US, and the ‘casual use’ culture surrounding marijuana is a subject of great debate and controversy, with arguments for drug legalisation making their way into our ........ Read more »

  • April 17, 2014
  • 06:30 AM
  • 14 views

Do nanoparticles have a "brand new" property?

by Chiara Civardi in United Academics

A new study reveals that nanoparticles can break the rules of thermodynamic: what do these findings imply? An interview with one of the researchers. ... Read more »

  • April 17, 2014
  • 04:31 AM
  • 10 views

Mitochondrial dysfunction as a neurobiological subtype of autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Suzanne Goh and colleagues [1] reporting on "a possible neurobiological subtype of mitochondrial dysfunction in ASD [autism spectrum disorder]" is a worthy addition to the research roll call which has graced this blog down the years. Based on the analysis of brain lactate levels - a potential marker of mitochondrial dysfunction - via the analysis of lactate doublets on brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), authors picked up a significantly higher rate of l........ Read more »

  • April 16, 2014
  • 08:29 PM
  • 21 views

What makes music groovy?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Today PLOS ONE publishes a study that uses an often criticized research method: questionnaire and web-based research (cf. Honing & Ladinig, 2008). This study, however, is a good example of how an unspectacular method (i.e. compared to, e.g., controlled experiments, brain imaging techniques or computational modelling) can still be quite informative.... Read more »

Witek, M., Clarke, E., Wallentin, M., Kringelbach, M., & Vuust, P. (2014) Syncopation, Body-Movement and Pleasure in Groove Music. PLoS ONE, 9(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0094446  

Honing, H., & Reips, U.-D. (2008) Web-based versus lab-based studies: a response to Kendall (2008). Empirical Musicology Review, 3(2), 73-77. info:/

  • April 16, 2014
  • 05:04 PM
  • 26 views

What Do Preschoolers Learn from Fantastical Picture Books?

by Rebecca Schwarzlose in Garden of the Mind

One of the new picture books making the bedtime rounds at our house is How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight?, which describes and depicts dinosaurs doing such un-dinosaurly things as tucking themselves into bed or kissing their human mothers good night. The book is whimsical, gorgeously illustrated, and includes a scientific angle, as the genus names of the dinosaurs are included in the pictures. I’m always careful to read these genus names aloud as we look at each picture. But is this book actu........ Read more »

  • April 16, 2014
  • 04:19 PM
  • 20 views

Sex in (floral) advertising

by Brooke LaFlamme in Molecular Love (and other facts of life)

Having a wingman can be helpful, but for many plants it’s absolutely crucial. Flowering plants don’t have smoky bars, speed dating or eHarmony. They have to rely entirely on their tiny wing—well, I guess “men” isn’t really appropriate. But unlike your witty friend who backs you up in the bar, pollinators don’t help plants with their dating life out of friendship alone. They need something in return, and flowers flaunt their assets to advertise the sweet ........ Read more »

  • April 16, 2014
  • 11:57 AM
  • 21 views

Quantum Dots Could Be Used to Make Efficient Solar Windows

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A house window that doubles as a solar panel could be on the horizon, thanks to recent quantum-dot work by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers in collaboration with scientists from University of Milano-Bicocca (UNIMIB), Italy.... Read more »

  • April 16, 2014
  • 09:37 AM
  • 34 views

Video Tip of the Week: NaviCell for custom interaction maps for systems biology

by Mary in OpenHelix

The onslaught of sequence data from a whole range of species and tissues continues, and certainly will for a long time. But moving from there to the level of understanding the interactions among the genes that contribute to the structures, behaviors, and phenotypes of the systems requires other types of supporting software. NaviCell is a […]... Read more »

Kuperstein Inna, Cohen David PA, Pook Stuart, Viara Eric, Calzone Laurence, Barillot Emmanuel, & Zinovyev Andrei. (2013) NaviCell: a web-based environment for navigation, curation and maintenance of large molecular interaction maps. BMC Systems Biology, 7(1), 100. DOI: 10.1186/1752-0509-7-100  

Funahashi A., Matsuoka Y., Jouraku A., Morohashi M., Kikuchi N., & Kitano H. (2008) CellDesigner 3.5: A Versatile Modeling Tool for Biochemical Networks. Proceedings of the IEEE, 96(8), 1254-1265. DOI: 10.1109/JPROC.2008.925458  

  • April 16, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 27 views

Does Animal-Assisted Therapy Help At-Risk Boys?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

If existing behavioural programs aren’t working, can therapeutic sessions with a dog help boys who have problems at school?Photo: criben / ShutterstockA new paper by Abbey Schneider et al (2014) investigates the success of a program designed to help boys who are considered ‘at-risk’ – by matching them up with a specially trained dog and handler.In Colorado, a group of elementary schools take part in a program called the Human Animal Bond in Colorado (HABIC). It is designed to help ........ Read more »

Schneider, A.A.,, Rosenberg, J., Baker, M., Melia, N., Granger, B., & Biringen, Z. (2014) Becoming relationally effective: High-risk boys in animal-assisted therapy. Human-Animal Interaction Bulletin, 2(1), 1-18. info:/

  • April 16, 2014
  • 08:05 AM
  • 22 views

Using Pain To Stop Pain

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Chronic pain can involve TRPV1 pathways, yet traditional TRPV1 antagonists cannot be used due to incidence of hyperthermia. New research has identified new routes of administration, new agonists and new allosteric functions that will make TRPV1 a viable target for chronic, acute, and cancer-mediated pains. Alternative mechanisms, such as counter irritants and acupuncture are also gaining in evidence for mechaisms that involve TRPV1 signaling pathways... Read more »

Andreev YA, Kozlov SA, Korolkova YV, Dyachenko IA, Bondarenko DA, Skobtsov DI, Murashev AN, Kotova PD, Rogachevskaja OA, Kabanova NV.... (2013) Polypeptide modulators of TRPV1 produce analgesia without hyperthermia. Marine drugs, 11(12), 5100-15. PMID: 24351908  

Lee MG, Huh BK, Choi SS, Lee DK, Lim BG, & Lee M. (2012) The effect of epidural resiniferatoxin in the neuropathic pain rat model. Pain physician, 15(4), 287-96. PMID: 22828682  

Kelly S, Chapman RJ, Woodhams S, Sagar DR, Turner J, Burston JJ, Bullock C, Paton K, Huang J, Wong A.... (2013) Increased function of pronociceptive TRPV1 at the level of the joint in a rat model of osteoarthritis pain. Annals of the rheumatic diseases. PMID: 24152419  

  • April 16, 2014
  • 06:16 AM
  • 23 views

Tiger sharks: Each to their own diving depth

by Aileen Cudmore in Natural Reactions

Despite some broad similarities, the diving behaviour of tiger sharks appears to vary greatly amongst individuals.... Read more »

  • April 16, 2014
  • 05:33 AM
  • 34 views

New Explanation For Depression And Chronic Stress

by Agnese Mariotti in United Academics

In a study just published in Nature Medicine, researchers have identified a new mechanism that is at least in part responsible for the brain alterations caused by loss of mTORC1 in patients suffering from Major Depressive Disorder.... Read more »

Ota KT, Liu RJ, Voleti B, Maldonado-Aviles JG, Duric V, Iwata M, Dutheil S, Duman C, Boikess S, Lewis DA.... (2014) REDD1 is essential for stress-induced synaptic loss and depressive behavior. Nature medicine. PMID: 24728411  

  • April 16, 2014
  • 01:54 AM
  • 27 views

Joined by HDAC (inhibitors)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm treading quite carefully with this post which came about following my [non-expert] reading of the paper abstract from Anand Venkatraman and colleagues [1] on a potential downside to the use of HDAC (histone deacetylase) inhibitors for treating spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), a progressive disease affecting movement and other knock-on functions. This follows other work suggesting that certain HDAC inhibitors might offer some important new lines of investigation when it co........ Read more »

  • April 16, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 36 views

Knees with an ACL Reconstruction Often Have Osteoarthritis Regardless of Graft Selection

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Knees with a history of an anterior cruciate ligament injury are more likely to have osteoarthritis compared with a healthy contralateral knee but graft selection has no effect on long-term outcomes, such as osteoarthritis or knee functional outcomes.... Read more »

  • April 15, 2014
  • 09:32 PM
  • 36 views

Stone Soup Eyes

by Reed College Dev Neuro in the Node

Another installment from the Developmental Neurobiology Students at Reed College. Hope you enjoy! It’s not often that you get to recount the classic tale of Stone Soup when thinking about developmental biology, but that’s exactly what we did when discussing an almost classic 2011 Nature paper from Yoshiki Sasai’s group. In the story, a grumpy […]... Read more »

Eiraku, M., Takata, N., Ishibashi, H., Kawada, M., Sakakura, E., Okuda, S., Sekiguchi, K., Adachi, T., & Sasai, Y. (2011) Self-organizing optic-cup morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture. Nature, 472(7341), 51-56. DOI: 10.1038/nature09941  

Nakano, T., Ando, S., Takata, N., Kawada, M., Muguruma, K., Sekiguchi, K., Saito, K., Yonemura, S., Eiraku, M., & Sasai, Y. (2012) Self-Formation of Optic Cups and Storable Stratified Neural Retina from Human ESCs. Cell Stem Cell, 10(6), 771-785. DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2012.05.009  

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