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  • August 21, 2014
  • 01:02 PM
  • 14 views

Jonas Salk and the Polio Comeback

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Jonas Salk, you should know this name, but chances are you don’t. He was the inventor of the polio vaccine, a disease that was feared more than the atomic bomb. Today we don’t think about it, no one “gets” polio anymore. Scientists get a bad rap today with the whole “autism-vaccine” BS. But they don’t know Salk, instead of making a small [see: huge] fortune from the drug, he refused to patent it and gave it to the people for essentially free. You think this story would have a happy ending, I mean we don’t have polio anymore… right? Well the devils in the details and it’s not good.[…]... Read more »

Drexler JF, Grard G, Lukashev AN, Kozlovskaya LI, Böttcher S, Uslu G, Reimerink J, Gmyl AP, Taty-Taty R, Lekana-Douki SE.... (2014) Robustness against serum neutralization of a poliovirus type 1 from a lethal epidemic of poliomyelitis in the Republic of Congo in 2010. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25136105  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 02:21 AM
  • 22 views

Do You Believe in Dog? A New Ball Game

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Hello Do You Believe in Dog(ers)!(source)After two years of mostly pen-pal style blogging, we're excited to share our new direction!When we first decided to create Do You Believe in Dog?, we committed to blogging back and forth about canine science for two years. We were able to celebrate achieving that goal at the recent 4th Canine Science Forum in Lincoln, UK and also reflect on the future of Do You Believe in Dog?The DYBID blog, Facebook and Twitter feeds have become vibrant places to access canine science studies and thoughtful commentary. We are pleased and proud of the space we have created and the community who enjoy it. We're as committed as ever to helping people access the canine science conversation, and moving forward, we've decided to open up DYBID as a space where other canine science practitioners can share their findings and thoughts.  What you can expect Guest contributors Following the format you've enjoyed in earlier guest posts (like Dog training: do you get the timing right?, Take a walk on the wild side: dingo science  and Black dog syndrome, a bad rap?) researchers and students of canine science are welcome to submit short posts to DYBID based on peer-reviewed research. We're hoping posts will focus on research either presented at academic conferences or published in scientific journals. If you have an idea for a post, check out the Contributors page for more details, and be in touch! Canine science highlights We'll continue our usual presence on Facebook and Twitter, and here on the DYBID blog we'll post fortnightly updates highlighting the canine science that we've been following in the previous two weeks (blog posts, scientific studies, websites, etc.). This slideshow is our first attempt at sharing Canine science highlights. We have used Storify so you can quickly flip through and click on anything you want more info about. [View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [01-15 August 2014] " on Storify]Where in the world are Mia and Julie?To simplify our Twitter presence:Mia will primarily manage the @DoUBelieveInDog feedJulie will continue being active on @DogSpies, as well as at her Scientific American Blog, Dog Spies, and her dog research group @Dog_CognitionYou can also stay in touch with Mia at @AnthroZooRG (her research group), @HumanAnimalSci (a podcast featuring the latest from Anthrozoology) and @WorkDogAlliance... Read more »

Fischhoff B., & Scheufele D. (2013) The science of science communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(Supplement 3), 14033-14039. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1213273110  

  • August 20, 2014
  • 07:03 PM
  • 22 views

Anthropogenic climate change and glacial loss explained by a single number: 25!

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

New analyses using climate circulation models and glacial dynamics indicates that anthropogenic forcing has caused 25% of glacial loss over the past 150 years and 69% over the past two decades.... Read more »

  • August 20, 2014
  • 12:30 PM
  • 39 views

The DNA Signature of Lupus

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

My Uncle suffered from Lupus. The disease itself should have a more sinister sounding name, given the effect it has on the body. Lupus is a form of autoimmune disease which attacks the body and causes an incredible amount of pain. It’s not pretty and complications from the disease can make life even more unbearable for people. There is no cure and sadly there are few treatments outside of managing the pain and side effects of the disease. Thankfully medical researchers have used DNA sequencing to identify a gene variant responsible for causing lupus in a young patient. […]... Read more »

Julia I Ellyard, Rebekka Jerjen, Jaime L Martin, Adrian Lee, Matthew A Field, Simon H Jiang, Jean Cappello, Svenja K Naumann, T Daniel Andrews, Hamish S Scott.... (2014) Whole exome sequencing in early-onset cerebral SLE identifies a pathogenic variant in TREX1. Arthritis . info:/10.1002/art.38824

  • August 19, 2014
  • 02:17 PM
  • 58 views

Hobby Lobby and the War on Race and Women

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There is a war going on and it's not on foreign soil. This war is the fight for the status quo, a war where you are only worth your skin color, a war where you are only worth as much as your gender. This war is all around us, we see it everyday, yet we let it quietly pass us by. We do this because, in all actuality, we are losing this war. I don't blame you if you don't believe me, you shouldn't.[…]... Read more »

  • August 18, 2014
  • 05:14 PM
  • 88 views

The 10,000-Hour rule is nonsense

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Have you heard of Malcom Gladwell’s 10,000-hour rule? The key to success in any field is practice, and not just a little. A new publication in the journal Psychological Science had a good look at all the evidence and concludes that this rule is nonsense. No Einstein in you, I am afraid. The authors of […]... Read more »

  • August 18, 2014
  • 01:21 PM
  • 53 views

We can Build it Better: The First Artificial Cell Network

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

How does the old saying go? Imitation, is the sincerest form of flattery? Well that is what we’ve been trying to do for a very long time, but mimicking the intricate networks and dynamic interactions that are inherent to living cells is difficult to achieve outside the cell. Unfortunately despite all our intelligence nature has had the upper hand on us for a long time. That has not changed… until now that is.[…]... Read more »

Karzbrun E, Tayar AM, Noireaux V, & Bar-Ziv RH. (2014) Programmable on-chip DNA compartments as artificial cells. Science (New York, N.Y.), 345(6198), 829-32. PMID: 25124443  

  • August 16, 2014
  • 01:00 PM
  • 92 views

Is your Stomach… Controlling your Mind?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Close the blinds, lock the doors, and find a safe place to hide. Are you alone? No, no you aren’t and you may not even be in control of your […]... Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 01:29 PM
  • 87 views

Swamp Thing and Plant Communication

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Maybe I’m dating myself here, but ever see the swamp thing movie, television show, or even the comic? Call me picky, after all we are talking about a human/plant hybrid, but he never needed to talk. I know, some of you are probably rolling your eyes at me given it’s a comic, movie or tv show [depending on your level of geek], but come on, this is science![…]... Read more »

G. Kim,, M. L. LeBlanc,, E. K. Wafula,, C. W. dePamphilis,, & J. H. Westwood. (2014) Genomic-scale exchange of mRNA between a parasitic plant and its hosts. Science. info:/10.1126/science.1253122

  • August 15, 2014
  • 11:34 AM
  • 54 views

Breaking research: A new technique for uncovering cell-specific differences in the Drosophila “interactome”

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

A recently published fly paper describes a new technique for uncovering cell-specific differences in protein interactions. I review this paper and discuss its relevance to human health.... Read more »

  • August 14, 2014
  • 08:27 PM
  • 88 views

Few but strong: dense tornado clusters on the rise in the United States

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Analysis of tornado frequency data over the last half-century shows that tornadoes are occurring on fewer days but with greater density and severity, indicating that climate change may be changing the local dynamics at play.... Read more »

JB Elsner, SC Elsner, TH Jagger. (2014) The increasing efficiency of tornado days in the United States. Climate Dynamics. info:/

  • August 14, 2014
  • 03:35 PM
  • 103 views

Bringing the Fight to hidden HIV

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

We’ve got even more news for the HIV cure front. Yesterday we talked about broadly neutralizing antibodies, today we are going to be touching on that yet again,so if you […]... Read more »

Ariel Halper-Stromberg, Ching-Lan Lu, Florian Klein, Joshua A. Horwitz, Stylianos Bournazos, Lilian Nogueira, Thomas R. Eisenreich, Cassie Liu, Anna Gazumyan, Uwe Schaefer, Rebecca C. Furze, Michael S. Seaman.... (2014) Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Viral Inducers Decrease Rebound from HIV-1 Latent Reservoirs in Humanized Mice. Cell. info:/10.1016/j.cell.2014.07.043

  • August 14, 2014
  • 12:10 PM
  • 85 views

HIV Vaccine One Step Closer to Reality

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

The war on HIV, that tricky little guy has avoided every thing we could throw at it in a broad sense. Sure a few people here and there get lucky, but we have yet to actually make any sort of we're going to kick your ass headway [don't worry it's the technical term for it]. That is hopefully going to change with a new scientific discovery that has enormous implications for HIV vaccine development. Researchers have uncovered novel properties of special HIV antibodies that promise to help eliminate HIV.[...]... Read more »

  • August 12, 2014
  • 03:18 PM
  • 57 views

Responsibility of demand: air travel projected to create net increase in greenhouse gas emissions

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

A literature review has revealed that our demand for air travel will lead to a net increase in greenhouse gas emissions despite improvements in energy efficiency. The authors predict behavior change and less flights to be the only way to reduce emissions.... Read more »

Matt Grote, Ian Williams, John Preston. (2014) Direct carbon dioxide emissions from civil aircraft. Atmospheric Environment. info:/

  • August 12, 2014
  • 02:07 PM
  • 72 views

Treatment and Prevention of PTSD

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

It’s no secret for anyone who follows me that I am a Marine veteran. It’s also no secret for anyone who follows me that I’ve had my own ups and downs in life because of my experiences. PTSD is a nightmare, one that you can’t quite shake no matter how hard you try. Then again, not everyone reacts the same way to the trauma that typically causes PTSD, not everyone walks away from war with it. The big question that scientists set out to answer was, why? And now they might just have an answer.[…]... Read more »

Nikolaos P. Daskalakis, Hagit Cohen, Guiqing Caia, Joseph D. Buxbaum, & Rachel Yehuda. (2014) Expression profiling associates blood and brain glucocorticoid receptor signaling with trauma-related individual differences in both sexes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(32). info:/10.1073/pnas.1401660111

  • August 11, 2014
  • 01:30 PM
  • 121 views

New Hope for Autoimmune Diseases

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Autoimmune diseases are on the rise. Since I have a history of over sharing, my Uncle suffered from a form of lupus. It caused him intense and — in my opinion — unbearable pain although he shouldered it like the incredible man he was and never complained. My sister unfortunately is suffering from a rare disease that has yet to be diagnosed, which in my opinion has autoimmune dysfunction as the root cause. If you or anyone you know suffers in a similar fashion then you know that the treatments for such things are, expensive, moderately effective at best, and are overall inadequate.[…]... Read more »

Chhabra S, Chang SC, Nguyen HM, Huq R, Tanner MR, Londono LM, Estrada R, Dhawan V, Chauhan S, Upadhyay SK.... (2014) Kv1.3 channel-blocking immunomodulatory peptides from parasitic worms: implications for autoimmune diseases. FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. PMID: 24891519  

  • August 10, 2014
  • 12:03 PM
  • 103 views

Pregnancy and Antibacterial Soap a Potentially Dangerous Combination

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

My wife likes to sanitize everything with bleach. I don’t really approve, but I bite my tongue because it makes her feel better. Germs are everywhere and honestly there is […]... Read more »

Pycke BF, Geer LA, Dalloul M, Abulafia O, Jenck AM, & Halden RU. (2014) Human biomonitoring of prenatal exposure to triclosan and triclocarban in a multiethnic urban population from Brooklyn, New York. Environmental Science , 8831-8838. info:/10.1021/es501100w

  • August 10, 2014
  • 05:18 AM
  • 100 views

Canine Science Forum 2014 - we come full circle!

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Aw - it's Us @ CSF2014! Thanks Tamás Faragó :)Dear Julie,while you've been off enjoying the fjords of Norway and I've been recovering from six legs of long haul flying with a three year old as hand luggage, I thought I'd put up a quick post to recap the wonderful week in Lincoln, UK that was the (Feline and) Canine Science Forum 2014.Such a fun, stimulating, inspiring week comprising the Feline Science day (Monday), public lecture by James Serpell (rhymes with purple) on Monday evening, Canine Science Forum (Tue-Wed-Thu), including the wonderful gala dinner at Lincoln Castle on Wednesday night and finally, the Companion Animals: Human Health & Disease day (Friday).If anyone out there happened to miss it, we live tweeted nearly all of the presentations so you can easily catch up on all the great thoughts via the magic of Storify here. Feline Science Day:[View the story "Feline Science Forum 2014" on Storify]Public lecture by James Serpell:[View the story "Feline & Canine Science Forum, Public Lecture: James Serpell" on Storify] Canine Science Forum Day 1:[View the story "4th Canine Science Forum - Lincoln UK 2014 - Day 1" on Storify] Canine Science Forum Day 2:[View the story "4th Canine Science Forum - Lincoln UK 2014 - Day 2" on Storify]Which, of course, included us being real life #scientists (we don't make this stuff up!): You talked about Project: Play with Your Dog and the role that citizen science can play in canine science.Nancy Dreschel (now on Twitter at @ndreschel) presented the key findings from our collaborative meta-analysis looking at canine salivary cortisol.And I explored if using group averages is really the best way to determine and analyse the stress and welfare experience of working dogs (and my points were relevant to all animals!). Then we drank wine in at a castle. Which was a mighty fine way to end that day. Canine Science Forum Day 3:[View the story "4th Canine Science Forum - Lincoln UK 2014 - Day 3" on Storify]Companion  Animals: Human Health & Disease 2014... Read more »

  • August 9, 2014
  • 01:45 PM
  • 351 views

Marijuana and the Developing Brain

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

You can’t get away from it, the big marijuana debate here in the US. Is it good? Is it bad? What are other countries doing? There are also a lot of claims made about marijuana, most of which aren’t true, namely the big medical claims. Then there is the other side of that fence, what about some of the health issues that are claimed, where does science sit on that?[…]... Read more »

Giedd JN, Blumenthal J, Jeffries NO, Rajapakse JC, Vaituzis AC, Liu H, Berry YC, Tobin M, Nelson J, & Castellanos FX. (1999) Development of the human corpus callosum during childhood and adolescence: a longitudinal MRI study. Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology , 23(4), 571-88. PMID: 10390717  

Giedd, J. N. (2004) Structural magnetic resonance imaging of the adolescent brain. Adolescent Brain Development: Vulnerabilities and Opportunities. info:/

Choo EK, Benz M, Zaller N, Warren O, Rising KL, & McConnell KJ. (2014) The impact of state medical marijuana legislation on adolescent marijuana use. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 55(2), 160-6. PMID: 24742758  

Joffe A, American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Substance Abuse, & American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Adolescence. (2004) Legalization of marijuana: potential impact on youth. Pediatrics, 113(6), 1825-6. PMID: 15173518  

  • August 8, 2014
  • 03:36 PM
  • 141 views

The Self Assembling Brain

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Let’s face it, if the brain were a lego set I would still be staring at the box wondering what I got myself into. So I guess we can just […]... Read more »

Lorenzo I. Finci et. al. (2014) The Crystal Structure of Netrin-1 in Complex with DCC Reveals the Bifunctionality of Netrin-1 As a Guidance Cue. Neuron. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2014.07.010

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