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  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 567 views

Placing the power to prevent HIV in the hands of women

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Gender, development, and HIV/AIDS: Implications for child mortality in less industrialized countries From International Journal of Comparative Sociology HIV/AIDS continue to have a devastating toll on less industrialized societies, According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) (2007) there were an estimated 2.1 million deaths from HIV/AIDS and 2.9 million new HIV infections [...]... Read more »

  • September 27, 2010
  • 09:22 AM
  • 479 views

Quit Yakking on Your Phone in Public

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

You’re on the bus after a long day at work when you hear…“Yeah, I’m on my way home.” “That’s funny.” “Uh-huh.” “What? No! I thought you were.” The lady next... Read more »

Emberson L.L., Lupyan G., Goldstein M.H., & Spivey M.J. (2010) Overheard Cell-Phone Conversations: When Less Speech Is More Distracting. Psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science/ APS. PMID: 20817912  

  • September 27, 2010
  • 07:33 AM
  • 732 views

can language affect blood flow?

by Chris in The Lousy Linguist

Do languages affect blood flow in the brain differently? Apparently, yes! In a recent fMRI study, researchers showed that Cantonese verbs and nouns are processed in (slightly) different parts of the brain than English nouns and verbs in bilinguals. The researchers used a lexical decision task to contrast the processing of English and Cantonese verbs and nouns in the brains of bilingual speakers.Chinese nouns and verbs showed a largely overlapping pattern of cortical activity. In contrast, Englis........ Read more »

Chan, A., Luke, K., Li, P., Yip, V., Li, G., Weekes, B., & Tan, L. (2008) Neural Correlates of Nouns and Verbs in Early Bilinguals. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1145(1), 30-40. DOI: 10.1196/annals.1416.000  

  • September 26, 2010
  • 06:01 PM
  • 845 views

Security, visibility and resilience

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

The numerous possibilities of disruptions and disturbances in the supply chain demand a supply chain that is responsive to a variety of threats, and the keys or tools to mitigating supply chain vulnerability are security, visibility and resilience. [ ... ]... Read more »

Glickman, T.S., & White, S.C. (2006) Security, visibility and resilience: the keys to mitigating supply chain vulnerabilities. International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management, 2(2), 107-119. info:/10.1504/IJLSM.2006.009554

  • September 26, 2010
  • 03:08 AM
  • 766 views

Foodies Eat Masculinity for Breakfast

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

What part does gender have to play in the practice of food, and eating? Apparently, acording to Cairns et al. (2010), quite a lot. Moreover, it would seem that men hog the public spotlight of culinary high art while women are confined to boiling eggs for the masses, at home.... Read more »

  • September 25, 2010
  • 09:38 AM
  • 900 views

Social Work Radicalism Repels Childhood Adversity

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

Social work, as a profession, has a long-standing, historical involvement in child protection. This article by Davidson et al. (2010) suggests we should stop to regroup to get a clearer picture of what childhood adversity really is, in all its inglorious complexity.... Read more »

Davidson, G., Devaney, J., & Spratt, T. (2010) The Impact of Adversity in Childhood on Outcomes in Adulthood: Research Lessons and Limitations. Journal of Social Work. info:/

  • September 24, 2010
  • 11:23 AM
  • 522 views

Risk, Insurance, LUST, and Fish

by Noam Ross in Noam Ross

Two papers crossed my desk yesterday highlighting the role insurance can play in mitigating environmental risk.  The first, by Yin et. al. in Risk Analysis, discusses three appoaches to mitigating the risk of leaking underground storage tanks (a problem with the fantastic acronym LUST).  
Large fines for spills, as it turns out, are not a particularly efficient enforcement tool, as most LUSTs are owned by small businesses like gas stations that would likely go bankrupt before payi........ Read more »

Holland, D.S. (2010) Markets, pooling and insurance for managing bycatch in fisherie. Ecological Economics. info:/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2010.08.015

  • September 24, 2010
  • 08:22 AM
  • 3,894 views

Language, Thought, and Space (V): Comparing Different Species

by Michael in A Replicated Typo 2.0

As I’ve talked about in my last posts (see I, II, III, and IV) different cultures employ different coordinate systems or Frames of References (FoR) when talking about space.  FoRs
“serve to specify the directional relationships between objects in space, in reference to a shared referential anchor” (Haun et al. 2006: 17568)
As shown in my last post . . . → Read More: Language, Thought, and Space (V): Comparing Different Species... Read more »

Haun DB, Rapold CJ, Call J, Janzen G, & Levinson SC. (2006) Cognitive cladistics and cultural override in Hominid spatial cognition. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(46), 17568-73. PMID: 17079489  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 06:02 PM
  • 902 views

Logistics risks – the new science?

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

This paper presents the five cornerstones of logistics as an academic discipline, and shows how logistics in fact can act as an integrative platform over a wide range of different issues at the micro meso and macro level. [ ... ]... Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 01:56 PM
  • 836 views

Reflections on the WEIRD Evolution of Human Psychology

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by PLoS Blogs:What happens if researchers inadvertently fall prey to confirmation bias at a societal level?Addressing this question Canadian psychologists Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine and Ara Norenzayan at the University of British Columbia (where I am also located) recently published a paper in the journal Behavioral Brain Sciences. Their research documents how most of the studies that psychologists claim show human universals are really just........ Read more »

Henrich, J., Heine, S., & Norenzayan, A. (2010) The weirdest people in the world?. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33(2-3), 61-83. DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X0999152X  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 01:56 PM
  • 666 views

Reflections on the WEIRD Evolution of Human Psychology

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by PLoS Blogs:What happens if researchers inadvertently fall prey to confirmation bias at a societal level?Addressing this question Canadian psychologists Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine and Ara Norenzayan at the University of British Columbia (where I am also located) recently published a paper in the journal Behavioral Brain Sciences. Their research documents how most of the studies that psychologists claim show human universals are really just........ Read more »

Henrich, J., Heine, S., & Norenzayan, A. (2010) The weirdest people in the world?. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33(2-3), 61-83. DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X0999152X  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 552 views

What makes Starbucks such a great place to work? A review of the HR policies across the best companies to work for

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

What makes it so great? An analysis of Human Resources practices among fortune’s best companies to work for From Cornell Hospitality Quarterly This article provides an analysis of Human Resources practices among the best companies to work for in the US, from an annual list compiled by Fortune. It examines aspects such as job growth, [...]... Read more »

  • September 22, 2010
  • 09:58 AM
  • 690 views

The citation game

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Although "Publish or perish" is more catchy, I believe it should be "Get cited or perish". Why? Because many people (without naming names, we're talking about your promotion committee)also rely on citation data when deciding a scientist's future.While citations often correlate with other measurements of scientific influence (awards, research grants, etc.) citations are hardly objective, and depend on more factors than someone finding your work useful.Time-dependent factors: Recent publications a........ Read more »

  • September 22, 2010
  • 07:33 AM
  • 700 views

Through the Language Glass (Part 2)

by Chris in The Lousy Linguist

This is part 2 of my review of Guy Deutscher's new book Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages. This covers The Language Lens (129-249). Part 1 is here. This review will cover the scientific evidence that Deutscher reviews suggesting that language affects thought, and will end with a shocking proposal.To sum up my review of part one: meh. Okay, we've established that culture can influence language. This is a lot less controversial than Deutscher makes it see........ Read more »

Guy deutscher. (2010) Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages. Metropolitan Books. info:/

  • September 22, 2010
  • 05:33 AM
  • 354 views

Courting artists to revitalize American cities

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Artist garret as growth machine? Local policy and artist housing in U.S. cities From Journal of Planning Education and Research In the last ten years the arts, and artists, have come to be seen as catalysts for the revitalization of American cities. This article demonstrates that in most cities, artist housing programs are considered part [...]... Read more »

  • September 21, 2010
  • 03:06 PM
  • 1,157 views

Genetic Anchoring, Tone and Stable Characteristics of Language

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

In 2007, Dan Dediu and Bob Ladd published a paper claiming there was a non-spurious link between the non-derived alleles of ASPM and Microcephalin and tonal languages. The key idea emerging from this research is one where certain alleles may bias language acquisition or processing, subsequently shaping the development of a language within a population of . . . → Read More: Genetic Anchoring, Tone and Stable Characteristics of Language... Read more »

  • September 21, 2010
  • 10:14 AM
  • 929 views

Memory, Social Structure and Language: Why Siestas affect Morphological Complexity

by Sean Roberts in A Replicated Typo 2.0

Why are children better than adults at learning second languages? Hypotheses suggest that it's easier to learn some parts of language with procedural memory, which atrophies in adults. But why has language evolved to be like this? I suggest that the answer lies in social structure and explain why taking siesta can affect the morphological complexity of your language.... Read more »

L. Kirk Hagen. (2008) The bilingual brain: Human evolution and second language acquisition. Evolutionary Psychology, 43-63. info:/

Christiansen, M., & Chater, N. (2008) Language as shaped by the brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 31(05). DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X08004998  

Hartshorne JK, & Ullman MT. (2006) Why girls say 'holded' more than boys. Developmental science, 9(1), 21-32. PMID: 16445392  

BACKHAUS, J., & JUNGHANNS, K. (2006) Daytime naps improve procedural motor memory. Sleep Medicine, 7(6), 508-512. DOI: 10.1016/j.sleep.2006.04.002  

  • September 21, 2010
  • 05:28 AM
  • 495 views

Male Genital Mutilation: Beyond the tolerable?

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From Ethnicities This article aims to show that, if Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) warrants the serious attention of policy-makers, then so too, despite quantitative differences, does Male Genital Mutilation (MGM). FGM is viewed by many as marking the boundary of toleration. Regarded as a painful, injurious, medically unnecessary tool of sexual control, inflicted by coercive [...]... Read more »

  • September 20, 2010
  • 08:01 PM
  • 1,511 views

The Mother Theresa Stamp and the Cultural Legacy of Postage

by Krystal D'Costa in Anthropology in Practice



Unveiling of the Mother Theresa postage stamp Sept. 5th, 2010 at the National Shrine. Postmaster General Jack Potter was in attendance (immediately to the left of the stamp).

Over the recent Labor Day weekend, S and I visited Washington D.C. where purely by chance we stumbled on a stamp unveiling. We were touring the National Shrine—the mosaics are breathtaking—when we realized the ceremony occurring at the front had little to do with normal services.  The United States Post Office h........ Read more »

  • September 20, 2010
  • 09:29 AM
  • 1,250 views

Language, Thought, and Space (IV): Comparing Different Cultures

by Michael in A Replicated Typo 2.0

In my last post on the relationship between language, thought and (thinking and talking about) space I wrote that one of the most interesting, but also one of the most difficult questions is to what extent linguistic differences in talking about space reflect conceptual and perceptual differences.

Researchers at the Max-Planck-Institute for Psycholinguistics (Nijmegen, Netherlands) and at . . . → Read More: Language, Thought, and Space (IV): Comparing Different Cultures... Read more »

Haun, D., Rapold, C., Call, J., Janzen, G., & Levinson, S. (2006) Cognitive cladistics and cultural override in Hominid spatial cognition. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 103(46), 17568-17573. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0607999103  

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