Post List

  • March 30, 2015
  • 08:27 PM
  • 8 views

Florida researchers find one in five college students may have misophonia – a hypersensitivity to sounds like lip smacking and pen clicking

by Megan Cartwright in Science-Based Writing

Almost one in five college students are so sensitive to common, annoying sounds like lip smacking and pen clicking that they may have misophonia—a little-understood condition where people overreact to irritating noises. The results come from a University of South … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 05:42 PM
  • 9 views

Welcome to the wikipedia for neurons

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

While the brain might not have more connections than stars in the universe (sorry guys), it is still complex. In fact, someone I respect defined a neuroscientist as “someone who knows how little we know about the brain.” Despite the decades worth of data that has been collected about the billions of neurons in the brain, we still don’t know much. So to help scientists make sense of the vast amount of information we already collected, researchers used data mining to create neuroelectro.org,........ Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 02:45 PM
  • 10 views

Heart Attack Carries Worse Prognosis In Dialysis Patients

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tanush Gupta, MD Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology New York Medical College, NY Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Gupta: There are approximately 600,000 prevalent cases of … Continue reading →
The post Heart Attack Carries Worse Prognosis In Dialysis Patients appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews a........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Tanush Gupta, MD. (2015) Heart Attack Carries Worse Prognosis In Dialysis Patients. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 01:38 PM
  • 9 views

Diagnosing TB in Children: Evaluating Xpert Assay

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Anne K Detjen, MD Child Lung Health Consultant International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Detjen: The bacteriological diagnosis of tuberculosis … Continue reading →
The post Diagnosing TB in Children: Evaluating Xpert Assay appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interview........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr Anne K Detjen, MD. (2015) Diagnosing TB in Children: Evaluating Xpert Assay. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 12:19 PM
  • 8 views

Cardiorespiratory Fitness May Decrease Cancer Risk and Improve Survival

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Susan G. Lakoski, M.D. Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology DivisionDepartment of Medicine Director, Cardiovascular Prevention Program for Cancer PatientsVermont Cancer Center, Division of Hematology/OncologyUniversity of Vermont, BurlingtonCo-Investigators from Cooper Center Longitudinal Study Cooper Institute in Dallas, Texas … Continue reading →
The post Cardiorespiratory F........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Susan G. Lakoski, M.D. (2015) Cardiorespiratory Fitness May Decrease Cancer Risk and Improve Survival. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 11:32 AM
  • 22 views

Gut Feelings

by Miss Behavior in The Scorpion and the Frog

This boy may be influencing who he will marry when he grows up. Photo by Orrling at Wikimedia Commons.Animals (including humans) are swarming with microorganisms both on and in our bodies. Humans harbor so many different microorganisms that we have over 150 times more microbial genes than mammalian genes, and it is reasonable to suspect that this scenario is similar for most animals. But before you run to soak in a tub of hand sanitizer, you should realize that many of these microorganisms are a........ Read more »

Ezenwa, V., Gerardo, N., Inouye, D., Medina, M., & Xavier, J. (2012) Animal Behavior and the Microbiome. Science, 338(6104), 198-199. DOI: 10.1126/science.1227412  

  • March 30, 2015
  • 11:25 AM
  • 13 views

One Parent,Two Parents and Child Well-Being

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

The structure of the family in the United States and other countries is changing. This change has occurred over a relatively brief period of time. Data noted in the study I am reviewing today shows that between 1970 and 2013 in the U.S.:Percentage of children living with two parents dropped 24%Percentage of children living with a single mother increased to 23.7%Percentage of children living with a single father quadrupled to 4.1%Percentage of children living with a grandparent doubled to 6......... Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 11:00 AM
  • 10 views

Human Evolution

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Evolution: How we became human. An Infographic by Yisela A. Trentini.... Read more »

W. Howard Levie, & Richard Lentz. (1982) Effects of text illustrations: A review of research. Educational Technology Research , 30(4), 195-232. info:/10.1007/BF02765184

  • March 30, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 17 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: “Hey, look over here for a second!” 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

This is sort of scary research. We all like to think our views on moral issues are pretty consistent and not easily shaken. That would be incorrect. They are not consistent and they are easily shaken. At least these are the conclusions reached by this research. We’ve written before about on which side of the […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: Telling jurors where to look
Simple Jury Persuasion: Activate the ‘intuitive prosecutor’
Simple Jury Persuasion: It’s really prett........ Read more »

Pärnamets P, Johansson P, Hall L, Balkenius C, Spivey MJ, & Richardson DC. (2015) Biasing moral decisions by exploiting the dynamics of eye gaze. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25775604  

  • March 30, 2015
  • 03:20 AM
  • 24 views

Asthma and ADHD (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Asthmatic children had a higher risk of also having ADHD."That was the conclusion reached by Kirsten Holmberg and colleagues [1] based on their analysis of rates of ADHD, and other variables found "through the Swedish Twin Register, linked to the Swedish Medical Birth Register, the National Patient Register and the Prescribed Drug Register." Said data came from over 20,000 twins who's parents were questioned when children were aged 9 or 12 years.For those unfamiliar with the proposed conne........ Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 17 views

On-field Management and Return-to-Play in Concussed Children are Lacking

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Only 58% of concussed children were managed according to recommended guidelines and 13% returned to play while symptomatic. Additionally, 93% of parents and 96% of players were unaware of their organization’s return-to-play guidelines following a concussion.... Read more »

  • March 29, 2015
  • 08:05 PM
  • 29 views

UK Researchers find parental perception of child’s weight is skewed

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Childhood obesity affects more than double the amount of children it did 30 years ago, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC). To figure out why the rate is increasing researchers studied the relationship between parents and their obese children to determine how to improve pediatric health. The study actually reveals how poorly parents rate their own child’s weight issues — at least until they reach extreme levels of obesity.... Read more »

Black et al. (2015) Child obesity cut-offs as derived from parental perceptions: cross-sectional questionnaire. British Journal of General Practice. info:/10.3399/bjgp15X684385

  • March 29, 2015
  • 05:45 PM
  • 27 views

A novel method makes gene therapy safer

by Valerie Ashton in The Molecular Scribe

An international team of researchers have validated a method for identifying human insulator genes that dampen the over-activity of therapeutic genes delivered during gene therapy.... Read more »

Liu M, Maurano MT, Wang H, Qi H, Song CZ, Navas PA, Emery DW, Stamatoyannopoulos JA, & Stamatoyannopoulos G. (2015) Genomic discovery of potent chromatin insulators for human gene therapy. Nature biotechnology, 33(2), 198-203. PMID: 25580597  

  • March 29, 2015
  • 02:43 PM
  • 33 views

Biofuel, good for the environment if you’re eating less

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

When the government first changed policy to require ethanol in gasoline, we were told it would reduce our carbon footprint. Then food prices rose significantly and corn in particular saw the largest price rise. This was because corn is a staple in production of almost any other food from eggs to beef, but the policy made environmental sense. Well it made sense, until you found out that the new government policy also took into account people eating less.... Read more »

Searchinger, T., Edwards, R., Mulligan, D., Heimlich, R., & Plevin, R. (2015) Do biofuel policies seek to cut emissions by cutting food?. Science, 347(6229), 1420-1422. DOI: 10.1126/science.1261221  

  • March 29, 2015
  • 10:42 AM
  • 35 views

Accelerated loss: western Antarctice ice shelf melting at faster pace within last decade

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

New satellite measurements have given unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution to Antarctice melting. The data indicates the Western shelf is melting faster than thought and the Eastern shelf is no longer gaining thickness. Important information to predict future sea level rises!... Read more »

  • March 29, 2015
  • 09:28 AM
  • 62 views

Music affects on the brain

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

A recent paper identified genes that changed their expression as a result of music performance in trained musicians. (see citation below). There were a surprising number of affected genes, 51 genes had increased and 22 had decreased expression, compared to controls who were also trained musicians but were not involved in making or listening to […]... Read more »

Kanduri, C., Kuusi, T., Ahvenainen, M., Philips, A., Lähdesmäki, H., & Järvelä, I. (2015) The effect of music performance on the transcriptome of professional musicians. Scientific Reports, 9506. DOI: 10.1038/srep09506  

  • March 29, 2015
  • 08:17 AM
  • 41 views

Modeling Life On Titan

by Jeffrey Daniels in United Academics

Lifeforms that live off methane instead of water are possible on Titan’s surface.... Read more »

  • March 29, 2015
  • 04:39 AM
  • 44 views

Sera from children with autism inducing autistic features in rats?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty."That was one of the findings reported in the paper by Syed Faraz Kazim and colleagues [1] (open-access) who, among other things, injected intracerebroventricularly sera collected from children with autism into newborn rats and examined behavioural effects compared with injections of sera from asymptomatic controls. Actually, that was only one part of the resea........ Read more »

  • March 28, 2015
  • 08:20 PM
  • 15 views

The neurobiological underpinnings of suicidal behavior

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

When you consider that so much of our energy and such a large portion of our behavioral repertoire is devoted to ways of ensuring our survival, suicide appears to be perhaps the most inexplicable human behavior. What would make this human machine--which most of the time seems to be resolutely programmed to scratch, claw, and fight to endure through even the most dire situations--so easily decide to give it all up, even when the circumstances may not objectively seem all that desperate? Suicide i........ Read more »

Turecki, G. (2014) The molecular bases of the suicidal brain. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 15(12), 802-816. DOI: 10.1038/nrn3839  

  • March 28, 2015
  • 07:23 PM
  • 7 views

Genetic Fingerprint May Lead To Blood Test For Colon Cancer

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Massimiliano Mazzone and Professor Hans Prenen Lab of Molecular Oncology and Angiogenesis VIB Vesalius Research Center University of Leuven Leuven Belgium Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: … Continue reading →
The post Genetic Fingerprint May Lead To Blood Test For Colon Cancer appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Professor Massimiliano Mazzone and Professor Hans Prenen. (2015) Genetic Fingerprint May Lead To Blood Test For Colon Cancer. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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