Erica Pratt

4 posts · 1,890 views

I am a graduate student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University. I currently work in the Micro/Nanofluidics Laboratory, directed by Prof. Brian Kirby in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. One of our lab interests is the design of microfluidic devices for the isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), and my research focuses on functional analyses of CTCs enabled by these devices. I can be contacted at circulatingtumorcellengineer[AT]gmail[DOT]com.

CTC Engineer
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  • December 10, 2012
  • 09:00 AM
  • 510 views

CTC genetic heterogeneity, a window into the metastatic process

by pratt_ed in CTC Engineer

Tumor genetic heterogeneity has emerged as an effective biomarker of malignant processes1-4. However, limited access to tissue in solid tumors makes repeated sampling and tracking of tumor genetic evolution infeasible. CTCs can serve as a “liquid biopsy”, allowing researchers to understand genetic heterogeneity of the cancer process in real time. The paper I’m reviewing today, “Single Cell Profiling of Circulating Tumor Cells: Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Diversity from Breast Cance........ Read more »

Powell Ashley A, Talasaz Amirali H, Zhang Haiyu, Coram Marc A, Reddy Anupama, Deng Glenn, Telli Melinda L, Advani Ranjana H, Carlson Robert W, & Mollick Joseph A. (2012) Single cell profiling of circulating tumor cells: transcriptional heterogeneity and diversity from breast cancer cell lines. PloS one. PMID: 22586443  

  • December 4, 2012
  • 09:00 AM
  • 332 views

Evaluating CTC isolation device performance

by pratt_ed in CTC Engineer

I’ve previously discussed how to sort CTCs, and the standards used to characterize device performance. Today, I’ll explain what some of the most common evaluation metrics are, and place them in context of eventual clinical/industrial application.... Read more »

Marrinucci Dena, Bethel Kelly, Lazar Daniel, Fisher Jennifer, Huynh Edward, Clark Peter, Bruce Richard, Nieva Jorge, & Kuhn Peter. (2010) Cytomorphology of circulating colorectal tumor cells:a small case series. Journal of oncology. PMID: 20111743  

Kirby Brian J, Jodari Mona, Loftus Matthew S, Gakhar Gunjan, Pratt Erica D, Chanel-Vos Chantal, Gleghorn Jason P, Santana Steven M, Liu He, & Smith James P. (2012) Functional characterization of circulating tumor cells with a prostate-cancer-specific microfluidic device. PloS one. PMID: 22558290  

  • November 30, 2012
  • 09:22 AM
  • 656 views

Cancer Cell Lines & CTCs: Benchmarking versus Application

by pratt_ed in CTC Engineer

In my “How to Sort CTCs” series, I covered a variety of sorting methodologies used for patient prognosis. However, before clinical implementation, it is important characterize device performance with a series of standards. This is impossible to do with a patient blood sample, because there is an unknown number of CTCs floating around with other blood cells, which can be effected by the cancer treatment process (e.g. radiation patients often have anemia)1. Furthermore, this is all changing d........ Read more »

Kirby Brian J, Jodari Mona, Loftus Matthew S, Gakhar Gunjan, Pratt Erica D, Chanel-Vos Chantal, Gleghorn Jason P, Santana Steven M, Liu He, & Smith James P. (2012) Functional characterization of circulating tumor cells with a prostate-cancer-specific microfluidic device. PloS one. PMID: 22558290  

Powell Ashley A, Talasaz Amirali H, Zhang Haiyu, Coram Marc A, Reddy Anupama, Deng Glenn, Telli Melinda L, Advani Ranjana H, Carlson Robert W, & Mollick Joseph A. (2012) Single cell profiling of circulating tumor cells: transcriptional heterogeneity and diversity from breast cancer cell lines. PloS one. PMID: 22586443  

Magbanua Mark Jesus M, Sosa Eduardo V, Roy Ritu, Eisenbud Lauren E, Scott Janet H, Olshen Adam, Pinkel Dan, Rugo Hope, & Park John W. (2012) Genomic profiling of isolated circulating tumor cells from metastatic breast cancer patients. Cancer research. PMID: 23135909  

Borrell Brendan. (2010) How accurate are cancer cell lines?. Nature, 463(7283), 858-858. DOI: 10.1038/463858a  

Hofman V. J., Ilie M. I., Bonnetaud C., Selva E., Long E., Molina T., Vignaud J. M., Flejou J. F., Lantuejoul S., & Piaton E. (2010) Cytopathologic Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells Using the Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cell Method: Promises and Pitfalls. American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 135(1), 146-156. DOI: 10.1309/AJCP9X8OZBEIQVVI  

Stott Shannon L, Hsu Chia-Hsien, Tsukrov Dina I, Yu Min, Miyamoto David T, Waltman Belinda A, Rothenberg S Michael, Shah Ajay M, Smas Malgorzata E, & Korir George K. (2010) Isolation of circulating tumor cells using a microvortex-generating herringbone-chip. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 20930119  

Cho Edward H, Wendel Marco, Luttgen Madelyn, Yoshioka Craig, Marrinucci Dena, Lazar Daniel, Schram Ethan, Nieva Jorge, Bazhenova Lyudmila, & Morgan Alison. (2012) Characterization of circulating tumor cell aggregates identified in patients with epithelial tumors. Physical biology. PMID: 22306705  

  • November 26, 2012
  • 10:25 AM
  • 392 views

How to Sort Circulating Tumor Cells Part IV: Electrokinetic Separation

by pratt_ed in CTC Engineer

Most CTC sorting devices target some observed cancer cell phenotype that was determined from studying tumor tissue directly, or from using immortalized cancer cell lines. This means that active sorting techniques, like size-based selection and immunocapture, require some level of a priori knowledge about CTCs before you can engineer a device to capture them. Microscopic characterization is one CTC identification method that circumvents this problem, fixing (killing) the cells, and then using ima........ Read more »

Pratt Erica D., Huang Chao, Hawkins Benjamin G., Gleghorn Jason P., & Kirby Brian J. (2011) Rare cell capture in microfluidic devices. Chemical Engineering Science, 66(7), 1508-1522. DOI: 10.1016/j.ces.2010.09.012  

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