neuroecology

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Neuroecology
54 posts

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  • October 3, 2014
  • 11:55 AM
  • 86 views

Tricksy insects sing a song of love and deceit

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Beyond a spider snacking on an unfortunate fly, the social lives of insects tend to go unrecognized. Perhaps you notice all the ants marching in a line, or bees heading back to a nest, but it all seems so mechanical, so primal. … Continue reading →... Read more »

Nakano, R., Ihara, F., Mishiro, K., Toyama, M., & Toda, S. (2014) Double meaning of courtship song in a moth. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1789), 20140840-20140840. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0840  

  • July 29, 2014
  • 12:32 PM
  • 171 views

Are silly superstitions useful because they are silly?

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

(Attention warning: massive speculation ahead.) Auguries often seem made up, useless. Is that why they are useful? Dove figured that the birds must be serving as some kind of ecological indicator. Perhaps they gravitated toward good soil, or smaller trees, or some other useful characteristic of a swidden site. After all, the Kantu’ had been […]... Read more »

  • July 28, 2014
  • 02:44 PM
  • 229 views

Watch ALL the neurons in a brain: Ahrens and Freeman continue their reign of terror

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Okay, not quite all of them. But it looks like Misha Ahrens and Jeremy Freeman are going to continue their reign of terror, imaging the whole zebrafish brain as if it’s no big deal. Yeah they’ve got almost every neuron of a vertebrate, so what? Besides figuring out that not shooting light at the eyes might […]... Read more »

Freeman, J., Vladimirov, N., Kawashima, T., Mu, Y., Sofroniew, N., Bennett, D., Rosen, J., Yang, C., Looger, L., & Ahrens, M. (2014) Mapping brain activity at scale with cluster computing. Nature Methods. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.3041  

Vladimirov, N., Mu, Y., Kawashima, T., Bennett, D., Yang, C., Looger, L., Keller, P., Freeman, J., & Ahrens, M. (2014) Light-sheet functional imaging in fictively behaving zebrafish. Nature Methods. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.3040  

  • July 24, 2014
  • 04:58 PM
  • 247 views

Why the new paper by Christakis and Fowler on friendship makes me queasy

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

I am a neuroscientist, and as a neuroscientist I have a strange belief that most of who we are comes from our brains. My entire career is based around understanding behavior from this neural level which I feel to be fairly justifiable. So when I see paper looking at the genetics of behavior, I expect to see at […]... Read more »

Christakis NA, & Fowler JH. (2014) Friendship and natural selection. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(Supplement 3), 10796-10801. PMID: 25024208  

Ripke, S., Neale, B., Corvin, A., Walters, J., Farh, K., Holmans, P., Lee, P., Bulik-Sullivan, B., Collier, D., Huang, H.... (2014) Biological insights from 108 schizophrenia-associated genetic loci. Nature, 511(7510), 421-427. DOI: 10.1038/nature13595  

  • July 23, 2014
  • 12:46 PM
  • 242 views

As a butterfly flaps its wings in Tokyo, a neuron in your head veers slightly heavenward…

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

When you look at the edge of a table, there is a neuron in your head that goes from silence to pop pop pop. As you extend your arm, a nerve commanding the muscle does the same thing. Your retina has neurons whose firing rate goes up or down depending on whether it detects a light spot […]... Read more »

Churchland, M., Cunningham, J., Kaufman, M., Foster, J., Nuyujukian, P., Ryu, S., & Shenoy, K. (2012) Neural population dynamics during reaching. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature11129  

Shenoy KV, Sahani M, & Churchland MM. (2013) Cortical control of arm movements: a dynamical systems perspective. Annual review of neuroscience, 337-59. PMID: 23725001  

  • July 2, 2014
  • 09:03 AM
  • 252 views

Chimps stick grass in their ears to be cool: notes on cultural transmission

by Neuroecology in Neuroecology

1. In 2010, a female chimpanzee named Julie began repeatedly stuffing a stiff blade of grass into her ear. This Grass-in-ear behavior has affectionately been dubbed “GIEB” by the scientists who observed it.... Read more »

Huffman, M., Nahallage, C., & Leca, J. (2008) Cultured Monkeys: Social Learning Cast in Stones. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17(6), 410-414. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8721.2008.00616.x  

Stocker R, Green DG, & Newth D. (2001) Consensus and cohesion in simulated social networks. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, 4(4). info:/

Rendell L, Fogarty L, Hoppitt WJ, Morgan TJ, Webster MM, & Laland KN. (2011) Cognitive culture: theoretical and empirical insights into social learning strategies. Trends in cognitive sciences, 15(2), 68-76. PMID: 21215677  

  • June 24, 2014
  • 10:51 AM
  • 205 views

Is it okay to eat fish if they don’t have any feelings?

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

When a scientific paper begins its list of keywords with “fish cognition”, you know you’re in for a good read. Culum Brown is tired of people eating fish, and he’s not going to take it anymore. Fish, he says, are smarter than you think. We need to cast off our view of them as dumb slimy creatures and […]... Read more »

  • April 29, 2014
  • 02:32 PM
  • 237 views

Study: Men smell and that will stress you out

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

A study in Nature Methods has kicked up a bit of a fuss: In 2007, his lab observed that mice spend less time licking a painful injection—a sign that they’re hurting—when a person is nearby, even if that “person” is a cardboard cutout of Paris Hilton. Other scientists began to wonder if their own data were […]... Read more »

Isogai Y, Si S, Pont-Lezica L, Tan T, Kapoor V, Murthy VN, & Dulac C. (2011) Molecular organization of vomeronasal chemoreception. Nature, 478(7368), 241-5. PMID: 21937988  

Sorge, R., Martin, L., Isbester, K., Sotocinal, S., Rosen, S., Tuttle, A., Wieskopf, J., Acland, E., Dokova, A., Kadoura, B.... (2014) Olfactory exposure to males, including men, causes stress and related analgesia in rodents. Nature Methods. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.2935  

  • April 8, 2014
  • 11:05 AM
  • 473 views

Information theory of behavior

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Biology can tell us what but theory tells us why. There is a new issue of Current Opinion in Neurobiology that focuses on the theory and computation in neuroscience. There’s tons of great stuff there, from learning and memory to the meaning of a spike to the structure of circuitry. I have an article in this issue and […]... Read more »

Sharpee, T., Calhoun, A., & Chalasani, S. (2014) Information theory of adaptation in neurons, behavior, and mood. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 47-53. DOI: 10.1016/j.conb.2013.11.007  

  • March 26, 2014
  • 12:27 PM
  • 425 views

Fractal organization in MMOs

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

One of my favorite pet topics is using MMOs (online games) to understand questions of social structure and economics. Benedikt Fuchs looked at social structure in the game Pardus: But exactly what kinds of structures form and to what extent these groupings depend on the environment is still the subject of much debate. So an interesting […]... Read more »

Fuchs B, Sornette D, & Thurner S. (2014) Fractal multi-level organisation of human groups in a virtual world. arXiv. info:/

  • March 12, 2014
  • 12:17 PM
  • 228 views

Nicole Rust and the brain that uses machine-learning

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

I love Indian sweets – they’re sugary and buttery and all over delicious. My only problem is, I can never remember what the ones that I like are called; I can usually picture them in my head, but that can make it a bit difficult to order. When I go to an Indian market that […]... Read more »

  • March 2, 2014
  • 11:46 AM
  • 296 views

#cosyne14 day 3: Genes, behavior, and decisions

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

For other days (as they appear): 1, 2, 4 How do genes contribute to complex behavior? Cosyne seems to have a fondness for inviting an ecogically-related researcher to remind us computational scientists that we’re actually studying animals that exist in, you know, an environment. Last year it was ants, this year deer mice. Hopi Hoekstra gave […]... Read more »

Gordon J. Berman, Daniel M. Choi, William Bialek, & Joshua W. Shaevitz. (2013) Mapping the structure of drosophilid behavior. arXiv. arXiv: 1310.4249v1

  • March 1, 2014
  • 04:39 PM
  • 240 views

#cosyne14 day 2: what underlies our neural representation of the world?

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Now that I’ve been armed with a tiny notepad, I’m being a bit more successful at remembering what I’ve seen. Connectivity and computations The second day started with a talk by Thomas Mrsic-Flogel motivated by the question of, how does the organization of the cortex give rise to computations? He focused on connectivity between excitatory neurons in […]... Read more »

Ganmor E, Segev R, & Schneidman E. (2011) Sparse low-order interaction network underlies a highly correlated and learnable neural population code. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108(23), 9679-84. PMID: 21602497  

  • February 28, 2014
  • 11:47 AM
  • 224 views

Cosyne, Day 1

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

To sum up day 1: I forgot my phone charger and all my toiletries and managed to lose my notebook by the end of the first lecture…! But I brought my ski gear, so there’s that. Mental priorities. Tom Jessel gave the opening talk on motor control. The motor cortex must send a command, or […]... Read more »

  • February 20, 2014
  • 02:03 PM
  • 218 views

Friends with benefits

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

tl;dr: Rodents will help each other get out of trouble, though they will help each other more if they are related. Social learning in rodents can require information transmission between ACC and amygdala, and the strength of synapses in mPFC dictates social status. He wanders into the room and stops – someone else is peering […]... Read more »

Ben-Ami Bartal I, Rodgers DA, Bernardez Sarria MS, Decety J, & Mason P. (2014) Pro-social behavior in rats is modulated by social experience. eLife. PMID: 24424411  

Ben-Ami Bartal I, Decety J, & Mason P. (2011) Empathy and pro-social behavior in rats. Science (New York, N.Y.), 334(6061), 1427-30. PMID: 22158823  

Jeon D, Kim S, Chetana M, Jo D, Ruley HE, Lin SY, Rabah D, Kinet JP, & Shin HS. (2010) Observational fear learning involves affective pain system and Cav1.2 Ca2 channels in ACC. Nature neuroscience, 13(4), 482-8. PMID: 20190743  

  • January 28, 2014
  • 10:21 AM
  • 267 views

Communication among animals (aka, I wasn’t droppin’ no eaves sir, honest.)

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

I have terrible hearing. I’m not hearing-impaired in any actual way, but whenever there is a lot of background noise – terrible music at a bar, the burbling of friends at a big party – I just cannot understand what people are saying even when they’re right nearby. I honestly spend most of time responding […]... Read more »

Tobias JA, Planqué R, Cram DL, & Seddon N. (2014) Species interactions and the structure of complex communication networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(3), 1020-5. PMID: 24395769  

  • December 11, 2013
  • 02:07 PM
  • 356 views

Why do we cry? (Part 2)

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

The crying was associated with a sorrowful facial expression, sobbing body movements, and a voice inflected with sadness. These physical manifestations ended with the termi- nation of stimulation and the patient described feeling sad, but could not express the trigger for the sadness or crying. Results were consistent and reproducible. I have previously wondered why […]... Read more »

Burghardt T, Basha MM, Fuerst D, & Mittal S. (2013) Crying with sorrow evoked by electrocortical stimulation. Epileptic disorders : international epilepsy journal with videotape, 15(1), 72-5. PMID: 23531727  

  • December 9, 2013
  • 12:54 PM
  • 297 views

Sticking electrodes in humans: the need to proceed

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

“But, right now, do you think I made you stronger or weaker?” “I felt the flash and as we talked through it… it made me stronger.” I can trace my interest in neuroscience quite directly to when I was nine and my teacher showed us a video of the famous Penfield Experiments (see above, I’m pretty sure […]... Read more »

  • December 2, 2013
  • 11:56 AM
  • 389 views

Learning to see through semantics

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Humans have a visual bias: everything in vision seems easy and natural to us, and it can seem a bit of a mystery why computers are so bad at it. But there is a reason such a massive chunk (about 30%) of cortex is devoted to it. It’s really hard! To do everything that it […]... Read more »

Frome A, Corrado GS, Shlens J, Bengio S, Dean J, Ranzato M, & Mikolov T. (2013) DeViSE: A Deep Visual-Semantic Embedding Model. NIPS. info:/

Dean T, Ruzon MA, Segal M, Shlens J, Vijayanarasimhan S, & Yagnik J. (2013) Fast, Accurate Detection of 100,000 Object Classes on a Single Machine. Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition. DOI: 10.1109/CVPR.2013.237  

  • November 26, 2013
  • 12:18 PM
  • 268 views

Learning socially but not socially learning

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

How do we distinguish learning from our friends from learning because our friends happen to be around? When I was younger, Goldeneye on the Nintendo 64 was the game to play, but I was sadly N64-less. Did I learn how to play Goldeneye because my friends were good at it and showed me, or because whenever I […]... Read more »

Ilan, T, Katsnelson, E, Motro, U, Feldman, M, & Lotem, A. (2013) The role of beginner’s luck in learning to prefer risky patches by socially foraging house sparrows . Behavioral Ecology. info:/10.1093/beheco/art079

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