Jeffrey B. Driban, PhD, ATC, CSCS

399 posts · 246,492 views

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  • October 1, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 35 views

Painful Arc in Flexion and Forward Scapular Posture = SLAP Surgery Recommendation

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The presence of a painful flexion arc and forward scapular posture seem to be relatively accurate in predicting who will need surgery for a SLAP tear after trying 6 weeks of rehabilitation. While this rule seems promising, more investigation is needed, and clinical decisions should be made on an individual basis.... Read more »

  • September 29, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 59 views

Parents, Where are You Getting Your Concussion Information?

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Parents of young athletes (5 to 15 year olds) lack of knowledge regarding concussion definition, signs and symptoms, and mechanisms. We need to implement more concussion education programs for parents of young athletes.... Read more »

  • September 24, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 64 views

Performance May Not Mirror Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Following autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), performance based and patient-reported outcomes can be valuable for measuring success. Patient-reported outcomes were better at all post-operative time points while performance-based measurements decreased for the first 6 months following ACI.... Read more »

  • September 22, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 76 views

Statins: Lower Cholesterol and Improve Tendon Healing While You’re at it!

by Katie Reuther in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Statins enhance rotator cuff healing following repair through stimulation of the acute inflammatory phase. Statins may be a useful modality to improve tendon healing and reduce re-tear rates.... Read more »

  • September 17, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 77 views

Not So Competitive Return Rates to Activity Following ACL Reconstruction

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Only 55% of athletes returned to competitive sport following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The debate continues as to whether hamstring or patellar tendon autograft is better. However, factors that may favor return to competitive sport include younger age, male gender, elite sport, and a positive psychological response. ... Read more »

  • September 15, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 78 views

Acute Gains in Motion After Single Bout of Stretching Predicts Short-Term Gains

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Acute changes in flexibility after either static or PNF stretching predict the gains in flexibility after a 7-day stretching program.... Read more »

  • September 7, 2014
  • 03:30 PM
  • 76 views

Can You Hear Me Now?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: The use of a tuning fork in ruling out fractures is not currently recommended due to low diagnostic accuracy. Little clinical standards, low study quality and small sample size limits the results therefore more standardization and training should be done to improve its clinical efficiency.

In some situations radiographic imaging is not readily available and clinicians must attempt to assess an injury with other tools such as a tuning fork. Unfortunately, the diagnostic accu........ Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 103 views

Education and Interaction may be the Key to Successful Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Therapy

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Scapular mobilizations, sham mobilizations, and supervised exercise can help alleviate symptoms related to subacromial impingement syndrome but no intervention was most effective.... Read more »

  • August 13, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 118 views

Make Sure You Charge That Phone Before Measuring Anterior Tibial Translation

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A mobile phone arthrometer application may be a reliable alternative to the KT-1000 when measuring anterior tibial translation following an anterior cruciate ligament injury.... Read more »

Andrea, F., Luigi, V., Daniele, M., Luca, M., Paolo, I., Giovanni, G., Fabio, C., & Raffaele, I. (2014) Smartphone versus knee ligament arthrometer when size does not matter. International Orthopaedics. DOI: 10.1007/s00264-014-2432-9  

  • August 11, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 166 views

Emergency Room Visits for Sports Injuries

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Sports-related injuries among teenagers accounts for over 430,000 emergency room visits in the United States in 2008 and represent a significant financial burden to the healthcare system.

Sports-related injuries in teenagers result in a significant number of emergency room visits, which can result in relatively large direct costs. However, little is known about national estimates of how many emergency room visits actually occur as well as the direct costs affiliated ........ Read more »

Nalliah RP, Anderson IM, Lee MK, Rampa S, Allareddy V, & Allareddy V. (2014) Epidemiology of Hospital-Based Emergency Department Visits Due to Sports Injuries. Pediatric Emergency Care, 30(8), 511-515. PMID: 25062295  

  • August 6, 2014
  • 12:04 AM
  • 170 views

Female Athletic Trainers Balancing Life and Motherhood

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Female mentors/role models who are successfully maintaining work-life balance are critical to the success and retention of quality female athletic trainers at the NCAA Division I level.... Read more »

  • August 4, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 195 views

Concussion Indicators of a Phenomenon Yet to be Defined

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Prevalent and consistent indicators of a concussion include observing disorientation or confusion immediately after the injury, and slower reaction time, poor balance, and impaired verbal learning and memory within 2 days after the injury.... Read more »

Carney N, Ghajar J, Jagoda A, Bedrick S, Davis-OʼReilly C, du Coudray H, Hack D, Helfand N, Huddleston A, Nettleton T.... (2014) Concussion guidelines step 1: systematic review of prevalent indicators. Neurosurgery. PMID: 25006974  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 116 views

The Devil Is In The Details…If You Can Get The Details Out

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Over 75% of surveyed collegiate athletes, who believed they sustained a concussion in the past year, reported not seeking proper medical attention for that concussion. The most common reason athletes reported not seeking proper medical attention was not believing the concussion was severe enough to warrant stopping the activity to seek out a medical professional.... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 155 views

Despite the Hype: Many Former NFL Athletes May Have Normal Neurological Function and Structure

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Neuropsychological impairments were found in some retired NFL players; however, the majority of retired NFL players had no clinical signs of chronic brain damage. Some retired players had lesions found on brain imaging tests and these were associated with the number of previous concussions.... Read more »

  • July 21, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 185 views

It’s Only One Little Muscle Group…The Impact of Lumbar Multifidus Size on Lower Extremity Injury

by Mark A. Sutherlin in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Smaller lumbar multifidus size during preseason and the competitive season was associated with lower extremity injury in Australian Football. Additionally, lumbar multifidus asymmetry, limb kicking dominance and a history of low back pain were also associated with increased lower extremity injury.... Read more »

Hides, J., Stanton, W., Mendis, M., Franettovich Smith, M., & Sexton, M. (2014) Small Multifidus Muscle Size Predicts Football Injuries. Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 2(6). DOI: 10.1177/2325967114537588  

  • July 16, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 142 views

Feel Like Phoning-In Your Concussion Symptoms? Not so Fast

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletes who have sustained a concussion exhibit a wide range of symptom severity scores when surveyed through text-messaging at various times during the day.... Read more »

  • July 14, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 183 views

Pitching: We Can Have too Much of a Good Thing

by Mark Rice in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Young pitchers who engage in “risk-prone” pitching activities are more likely to report arm tiredness and pain, which is related to shoulder and elbow injuries.... Read more »

Yang, J., Mann, B., Guettler, J., Dugas, J., Irrgang, J., Fleisig, G., & Albright, J. (2014) Risk-Prone Pitching Activities and Injuries in Youth Baseball: Findings From a National Sample. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(6), 1456-1463. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514524699  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 164 views

If You’re Not Using the SCAT-2 For On-Field Concussion Diagnosis Maybe You Should Be

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The SCAT-2 tool composite score is useful in sports-related concussion assessment in a college setting due to its high sensitivity and specificity especially if you can compare a post injury score with a baseline measure.... Read more »

  • July 2, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 199 views

What’s Really Causing Those Knee Stability Deficits Following an ACL Reconstruction?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) rehabilitation patients continue to experience muscular strength and stability deficits in the affected limb compared with the unaffected limb. This is potentially caused by the loss of neuromuscular control following ACLR and the rehabilitation process.... Read more »

  • June 23, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 173 views

How Much is Too Much? Defining Nonprescription Pain Medication Misuse

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Division II and III athletes use and misuse nonprescription pain medication for sports-related pain less often compared with Division 1-A football athletes.... Read more »

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