Katy Meyers Emery

158 posts · 96,293 views

Katy Meyers Emery is a mortuary archaeology grad student at Michigan State University.

Bones Don't Lie
158 posts

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  • January 27, 2015
  • 10:48 AM
  • 40 views

Reuse of Cemeteries in Prehistoric Ireland

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

With the cold weather and ice descending upon the Midwest, I’ve found myself spending more time watching HGTV than I normally do. My favorite shows are the fixer upper ones, […]... Read more »

  • January 20, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 73 views

Mostly Dead, but Slightly Alive: The Life After Death of Dismembered Remains in Ancient Peru

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

In the Princess Bride, the deceased body of Westley is brought to Miracle Max in order to bring him back to life. Famously, May says ‘There’s a big difference between mostly dead […]... Read more »

  • January 15, 2015
  • 09:02 AM
  • 98 views

Trepanation! Not Just For Headaches: Tibial Surgery in Ancient Peru

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Over the past two years, I’ve been commuting from my home to my university. It’s about an hour drive each way (unless it’s snowing, and then it could be two […]... Read more »

Toyne, J. (2015) Tibial surgery in ancient Peru. International Journal of Paleopathology, 29-35. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpp.2014.09.002  

  • January 13, 2015
  • 07:00 AM
  • 102 views

Not All Are Buried Here: Selective Burial in Prehistoric Spain

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Interpreting cemeteries in order to understand the living population is a dangerous and difficult task. On the one hand, cemeteries are really our only form of information about the actual […]... Read more »

  • December 18, 2014
  • 08:51 AM
  • 121 views

Happy Holidays: Gifts for the Deceased in Anglo-Saxon England

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

The holiday season is upon us, and that means that many of us are thinking about gifts. As I’ve been wrapping the presents I’ve bought for my family, I’ve been […]... Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 02:32 PM
  • 182 views

The Headless Romans: Headhunting, Defeated Gladiators or Natural River Movement?

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

In the Walbrook Valley near the city of London, large numbers of human remains, dating to the Roman occupation of England, have been recovered over the past 175 years- and […]... Read more »

  • December 3, 2014
  • 09:03 AM
  • 231 views

Where do Vampires come from? Isotopic Analysis of the Drawsko Vampires

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Vampires have continued to be a hot topic in studies of deviant burial practices, and the popular news is more than happy to share these types of archaeological finds. Of […]... Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 09:19 AM
  • 204 views

On The Road: Mobility of Romans in Britains

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

The remains of the Roman Empire are found throughout Europe, Africa and the Middle East- aqueducts, stadiums, roads, temples, and cemeteries dot the modern landscapes of many European countries. Their […]... Read more »

Eckardt, H., Müldner, G., & Lewis, M. (2014) People on the move in Roman Britain. World Archaeology, 46(4), 534-550. DOI: 10.1080/00438243.2014.931821  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 08:34 AM
  • 193 views

Changes in Society and Diet from the Merovingian to Viking Age

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Vikings are a hot topic right now. While I would hope this would be due to their interesting maritime culture, fascinating burial practices or an increased understanding in the important role […]... Read more »

  • October 29, 2014
  • 09:05 AM
  • 202 views

Halloween Horrors: Evidence of Torture in the Prehistoric Southwest US

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

With Halloween coming up right around the corner, there have been an increase in the attention paid to the spookier aspects of archaeology. We are increasingly able to find evidence of […]... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 11:49 AM
  • 198 views

New Morbid Terminology: Overburden

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

As funerary archaeologists, we need to consider the whole range of behavior surrounding death and burial. This includes the ritual surrounding preparation of the body for burial, modes of transportation […]... Read more »

  • September 23, 2014
  • 08:51 AM
  • 259 views

Disarticulated Remains: Evidence of Ritual or Scavenging?

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

There is a joke among archaeologists about the use of the term ‘ritual’. Basically, it seems to be a common thing that when an archaeologist can’t understand a site, when […]... Read more »

  • September 17, 2014
  • 10:02 AM
  • 268 views

An Unusual Case of Scurvy found in the Maya

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Scurvy is caused by a lack of vitamin C in one’s nutrition. Historical accounts of the disease are first recorded in 1845, noting the presence of rosy patches of skin, […]... Read more »

  • September 9, 2014
  • 02:07 PM
  • 224 views

Cemeteries: Peaceful Resting Places or Competitive Interactive Arenas?

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

When I think about modern cemeteries, I usually perceive them as quiet resting places for the deceased. As I drive by them they are usually well kept, maintained green spaces […]... Read more »

Koji Mizoguchi. (2014) The centre of their life-world: the archaeology of experience at the Middle cemetery of Tateiwa-Hotta, JapanYayoi. Antiquity, 836-850. info:/

  • September 4, 2014
  • 01:00 PM
  • 275 views

Performing Funerals in Mycenaean Greece (1600-1100 BCE)

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

I’ve been spending the last few days learning about grave goods found with the dead during the Early Anglo-Saxon period. Grave goods are an interesting artifact- as it isn’t something […]... Read more »

Boyd, Michael. (2014) The materiality of performance in Mycenaean funerary practices. World Archaeology. info:/

  • August 20, 2014
  • 01:22 PM
  • 311 views

Agriculture, Inequality and Cremation in Iron Age Spain

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

One of the major debates in archaeology is when do we begin to see inequality among human groups, and what caused this this to happen. Social inequality has been defined […]... Read more »

JORGE DE TORRES RODRÍGUEZ. (2014) A PLACE FOR EVERYONE. THE STRUCTURE OF ARROYO CULEBRO D CEMETERY AND THE SOCIAL ORGANIZATION IN THE MIDDLE TAGUS VALLEY IRON AGE (SPAIN). Oxford Journal of Archaeology. info:/

  • August 12, 2014
  • 08:59 AM
  • 304 views

Why are the elderly invisible in archaeological contexts?

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

For the past two months, I have been busy preparing my dissertation data for analysis. This means that I am taking the paper versions of my data from books, monographs, […]... Read more »

C. Cave, & M. Oxenham. (2014) Identification of the Archaeological ‘Invisible Elderly’: An Approach Illustrated with an Anglo-Saxon Example. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology. info:/

  • July 29, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 309 views

Finding the Missing Stories: The Prior Cemetery’s Unmarked Slave Graves

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

One of the more common (though often frustrating) questions we get in archaeology is “Why are you doing historic archaeology? We already know what happened”. To some extent, for eras […]... Read more »

  • July 24, 2014
  • 09:12 AM
  • 261 views

Using Teeth to Learn About Diet, Cooking and Food Processing in Prehistoric Sudan

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

How could someone determine what you eat from only examining the things you leave behind? To add to the challenge, you would be hypothetically deceased and unable to communicate your […]... Read more »

  • July 15, 2014
  • 08:53 AM
  • 316 views

Understanding Privileged Access to Water from the Dead

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

As humans, we cannot survive without water. In the first world, we are privileged to have consistent access to fresh clean water. In many countries, access to water is based […]... Read more »

Lightfoot, E., Šlaus, M., & O'Connell, T. (2014) Water consumption in Iron Age, Roman, and Early Medieval Croatia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 154(4), 535-543. DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.22544  

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