Henkjan Honing

110 posts · 70,809 views

Professor in Music Cognition at the University of Amsterdam

Music Matters
110 posts

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  • April 16, 2014
  • 08:29 PM
  • 33 views

What makes music groovy?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Today PLOS ONE publishes a study that uses an often criticized research method: questionnaire and web-based research (cf. Honing & Ladinig, 2008). This study, however, is a good example of how an unspectacular method (i.e. compared to, e.g., controlled experiments, brain imaging techniques or computational modelling) can still be quite informative.... Read more »

Witek, M., Clarke, E., Wallentin, M., Kringelbach, M., & Vuust, P. (2014) Syncopation, Body-Movement and Pleasure in Groove Music. PLoS ONE, 9(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0094446  

Honing, H., & Reips, U.-D. (2008) Web-based versus lab-based studies: a response to Kendall (2008). Empirical Musicology Review, 3(2), 73-77. info:/

  • February 18, 2014
  • 07:32 AM
  • 148 views

Can bonobos synchronize to the beat?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Today the Daily Mail reports on an exciting new finding: Patricia Gray (University of North Carolina in Greensboro) and Ed Large (University of Connecticut) claim to have shown that bonobo's can synchronise to a beat.
... Read more »

  • January 15, 2014
  • 05:51 AM
  • 227 views

Differences in rhythmic cognition between human and non-human primates?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Despite their genetic proximity, human and non-human primates differ in their capacity for beat induction, which is the ability to perceive a regular pulse in music or auditory stimuli and accordingly align motor skills by way of foot-tapping or dancing.... Read more »

Merchant, H., & Honing, H. (2013) Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 7(274). info:/

  • December 29, 2013
  • 09:23 AM
  • 277 views

Rhythm cognition in humans vs monkeys explained?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

This week a theoretical paper will come out in Frontiers in Neuroscience that reviews the literature on rhythm and timing in humans and nonhuman primates observing different species to species behavior in interval-based timing versus beat-based timing.... Read more »

Merchant, H., & Honing, H. (2013) Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 7(274). info:/

  • December 17, 2013
  • 11:34 AM
  • 197 views

Do you know this song?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

A challenging Citizen-Science Name-That-Tune game to study what makes a melody stick in our minds...... Read more »

J.A. Burgoyne et al. (2013) Hooked: A game for discovering what makes music catchy. Proceedings ISMIR. info:/

  • October 22, 2013
  • 09:00 AM
  • 247 views

Brazilian bird sings Mozart?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Brazilian bird sings Mozart...... Read more »

Emily Doolittle, & Henrik Brumm. (2012) O Canto do Uirapuru: Consonant intervals and patterns in the song of the musician wren. Journal of Interdisciplinary Music Studies, 6(1), 55-85. info:/

Araya-Salas, Marcelo. (2012) Is birdsong music? Evaluating harmonic intervals in songs of a Neotropical songbird. Animal Behaviour, 84(2), 309-313. info:/10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.04.038

  • June 2, 2013
  • 11:23 AM
  • 398 views

Does music makes us move?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

At TEDxWaterloo 2013 Jessica Grahn – a cognitive neuroscientist working at Western University, Canada – presented an engaging talk about why music moves us, and why picking up the beat might make us unique.
... Read more »

  • May 16, 2013
  • 11:16 AM
  • 324 views

'Vocal mimicry hypothesis' falsified? [Part 2]

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

A few entries ago I uploaded a fragment from a study that discusses an intriguing experiment with three chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) which were trained to tap regularly on a piano keyboard...... Read more »

  • April 21, 2013
  • 11:23 AM
  • 379 views

Was Steven Pinker right after all? [Part 2]

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Last week Science published a study (a follow-up of Salimpoor et al., 2011) in which Canadian researchers showed that music can arouse feelings of euphoria and craving, similar to tangible rewards that involve the striatal dopaminergic system. ... Read more »

  • April 2, 2013
  • 03:04 AM
  • 425 views

Steven Pinker: "People in music hate this theory"

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Steven Pinker explains again why music is not an adaptation but should be seen as a kind of 'supernormal stimulus'...... Read more »

Honing, H. (2011) Muziek is geen luxe.. maar wat dan wel?. Academische Boekengids. info:/

Collier, D., Honing, H., & Oliver, R. (2012) REVIEWS. Journal of Music, Technology and Education, 5(1), 109-121. DOI: 10.1386/jmte.5.1.109_5  

  • April 1, 2013
  • 05:00 PM
  • 570 views

Can a Sea Lion keep the beat too?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Yesterday another piece of evidence was published in the Journal of Comparative Psychology showing a sea lion (Zalophus californianus) being able to learned to entrain to the beat of the music.... Read more »

  • January 28, 2013
  • 08:36 AM
  • 387 views

Can monkeys spontaneously synchronize to audio?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Today a new study appeared in Nature Scientific Reports claiming to show rhythmic entrainment (or spontaneous synchronization as the authors refer to it) in the Japanese macaque (Macaca Fuscata). Intriguing! However, reading the paper it becomes clear quickly that the results might not be what they seemed at first sight. ... Read more »

  • January 21, 2013
  • 11:23 AM
  • 544 views

Can the origins of music be studied at all?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

What was the role of music in the evolutionary history of human beings? And is it possible at all, you might wonder, to empirically study this, given the fact that neither music nor musicality fossilises? So, better forget about it? ... Read more »

  • December 12, 2012
  • 04:54 PM
  • 459 views

Can rhesus monkeys detect the beat in music?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Beat induction, the ability to pick up regularity – the beat – from a varying rhythm, is not an ability that rhesus monkeys possess. These are the findings of researchers from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and our group in Amsterdam, which are published today in PLOS ONE. ... Read more »

  • December 10, 2012
  • 08:52 AM
  • 496 views

Do music and language share the same resources?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

The interest in the relationship between music and language is a long-standing one. While Lerdahl & Jackendoff in their seminal book on the generative theory of tonal music built mostly on insights of metrical phonology of the time, more recent studies draw attention to the parallels with current minimalist syntactic theory rather than phonology.... Read more »

Peretz, I., & Coltheart, M. (2003) Modularity of music processing. Nature Neuroscience, 6(7), 688-691. DOI: 10.1038/nn1083  

Patel, A. (2003) Language, music, syntax and the brain. Nature Neuroscience, 6(7), 674-681. DOI: 10.1038/nn1082  

  • October 29, 2012
  • 11:00 AM
  • 523 views

Can the domains of Music Cognition and Music Information Retrieval inform each other?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

In about a weeks time the 13th ISMIR (International Society for Music Information Retrieval) conference will be held. This is a conference on the processing, searching, organizing and accessing music-related data. It attracts a research community that is intrigued by the revolution in music distribution and storage brought about by digital technology which generated quite some research activity and interest in academia as well as in industry.... Read more »

Aucouturier, J., & Bigand, E. (2012) Mel Cepstrum . Proc. of the 13th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference, 397-402. info:/

Volk. A., & Honingh, A. (eds). (2012) Mathematical and Computational Approaches to Music: Three Methodological Reflections . Journal of Mathematics and Music, 6(2). info:/10.1080/17459737.2012.704154

  • October 13, 2012
  • 11:00 AM
  • 1,011 views

A new vocal learner found?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

In a study that appeared in PLoS ONE two days ago, co-authored by Gustavo Arriaga, Eric Zhou and Erich Jarvis (Duke University), it was shown that a motor cortex region in mice is active during singing, and that it projects directly to brainstem vocal motor neurons that is necessary for keeping song more stereotyped and on pitch.... Read more »

Holy TE, & Guo Z. (2005) Ultrasonic songs of male mice. PLoS biology, 3(12). PMID: 16248680  

Arriaga, G., Zhou, E. P., & Jarvis, E. D. (2012) Of Mice, Birds, and Men: The Mouse Ultrasonic Song-system Has Some Features SImilar to Humans and Song-Learning Birds. PLoS ONE, 7(10). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0046610

  • October 12, 2012
  • 05:35 AM
  • 718 views

What's new in Music Cognition and the Cognitive Sciences?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Why should music be of interest to cognitive scientists, and what role does it play in human cognition? ... Read more »

Pearce, Marcus, & Rohrmeier, Martin. (2012) Music Cognition and the Cognitive Sciences. Topics in Cognitive Science, 4(4), 468-484. info:/10.1111/j.1756-8765.2012.01226.x

  • October 7, 2012
  • 01:00 AM
  • 587 views

Is birdsong music?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Many studies on the origins of music concern the question of what defines music. Can birdsong, the song structure of humpback whales, a Thai elephant orchestra, or the interlocking duets of Gibbons be considered music? ... Read more »

Araya-Salas, Marcelo. (2012) Is birdsong music? Evaluating harmonic intervals in songs of a Neotropical songbird. Animal Behaviour, 84(2), 309-313. info:/10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.04.038

  • September 14, 2012
  • 04:05 AM
  • 357 views

A case of congenital beat deafness? [revisited]

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Mathieu, apparently lacking a sense of beat.Isabelle Peretz, co-director of the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS), told me about Mathieu during a workshop at the Université Libre de Bruxelles in November 2009. She was very excited, and was pretty sure she found a 'beat-deaf' person. I couldn’t but share her enthusiasm. In Phillips-Silver et al. (2011) Peretz and her team wrote:'Mathieu was discovered through a recruitment of subjects who felt they could not........ Read more »

Phillips-Silver, J., Toiviainen, P., Gosselin, N., Piché, O., Nozaradan, S., Palmer, C., & Peretz, I. (2011) Born to dance but beat deaf: A new form of congenital amusia. Neuropsychologia. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2011.02.002  

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