Janet Kwasniak , Janet Kwasniak

157 posts · 92,849 views

Neuro-patch
43 posts

Sort by Latest Post, Most Popular

View by Condensed, Full

  • October 15, 2014
  • 09:13 AM
  • 81 views

Remembering visual images

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

There is an interesting recent paper (see citation) on visual memory. The researchers’ intent is to map and areas and causal directions between them for a particular process in healthy individuals so that sufferers showing lost of that process can be studied in the same way and the areas/connections which are faulty identified. In this […]... Read more »

Nenert, R., Allendorfer, J., & Szaflarski, J. (2014) A Model for Visual Memory Encoding. PLoS ONE, 9(10). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0107761  

  • October 9, 2014
  • 12:11 PM
  • 91 views

Fine control

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

My last blog on timing in some neurons in the cerebellum has started a string of thoughts. Here we have a part of the brain with an anatomy that is well mapped as opposed to many other parts. It has more neurons than the rest of the brain put together. It has grown relatively larger […]... Read more »

  • October 6, 2014
  • 07:17 AM
  • 95 views

A new feature of neurons

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

There are articles asking, “Are we ever going to understand the brain?” They imply that we have been studying the brain for long enough to be able to say how it works, if we are ever going to, and therefore hinting that it is a permanent mystery. But every week or so some new wrinkle […]... Read more »

Johansson, F., Jirenhed, D., Rasmussen, A., Zucca, R., & Hesslow, G. (2014) Memory trace and timing mechanism localized to cerebellar Purkinje cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1415371111  

  • September 30, 2014
  • 12:18 AM
  • 114 views

Conscious content

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

I have been thinking about some information in a not too recent paper. (see citation below) Panagiotaropoulos and others looked at the location of the content of consciousness in primates. They used binocular flash suppression (BFS) to give two different visual stimulation that compete for a place in the content of consciousness. Here is their […]... Read more »

  • September 27, 2014
  • 02:18 PM
  • 148 views

Sometimes choices are not thought out

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

In some competitive situations animals can produce random behavior rather than behavior based on prior experience. The anterior cingulate cortex is where strategies based on models of reality and history are generated; switching to random behavior is done by inputs to this part of the brain from the locus coeruleus. This was reported in a […]... Read more »

  • September 24, 2014
  • 08:15 AM
  • 119 views

Doing a task while asleep

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

A recent paper (citation below) describes subjects working away at a task, categorizing words, while asleep. Here is the abstract: Falling asleep leads to a loss of sensory awareness and to the inability to interact with the environment. While this was traditionally thought as a consequence of the brain shutting down to external inputs, it […]... Read more »

Kouider, S., Andrillon, T., Barbosa, L., Goupil, L., & Bekinschtein, T. (2014) Inducing Task-Relevant Responses to Speech in the Sleeping Brain. Current Biology, 24(18), 2208-2214. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.08.016  

  • September 12, 2014
  • 04:33 AM
  • 128 views

Astrocyte role in gamma waves

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

The study of the brain has been very neuron centered. Glial cells outnumber neuron by about 10 to 1 in the cortex and are known to be important to brain function but it is not clear just what they do other than some housekeeping tasks and shepherding neurons to their final locations during development. Astrocyte […]... Read more »

Lee, H., Ghetti, A., Pinto-Duarte, A., Wang, X., Dziewczapolski, G., Galimi, F., Huitron-Resendiz, S., Pina-Crespo, J., Roberts, A., Verma, I.... (2014) Astrocytes contribute to gamma oscillations and recognition memory. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(32). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1410893111  

  • September 9, 2014
  • 08:54 AM
  • 129 views

Discovering rules unconsciously

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

Dijksterhuis and Nordgren put forward a theory of unconscious thought. They propose that there are two types of thought process: conscious and unconscious. “CT (conscious thought) refers to object-relevant or task-relevant cognitive or affective thought processes that occur while the object or task is the focus of one’s conscious attention, whereas UT (unconscious thought) refers […]... Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 05:38 AM
  • 131 views

Mind to mind transfer

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

  I read the abstract of a new paper (see citation below) about brain-to-brain communication. I had been thinking while I read the title that we already do brain-to-brain communication – it’s called language. And sure enough the first sentence of the abstract said, “Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the […]... Read more »

Grau C, Ginhoux R, Riera A, Nguyen TL, Chauvat H, Berg M, Amengual JL, Pascual-Leone A, & Ruffini G. (2014) Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies. PloS one, 9(8). PMID: 25137064  

  • July 13, 2014
  • 09:23 AM
  • 204 views

Language and handedness

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

  I am both left handed and dyslexic and so a recent paper on the connection in hemispheric dominance for hand and for language was a paper I had to read. The Mazoyer study seems to be the first to use a reasonable number of left- and as well as right-handed people to look at […]... Read more »

  • June 28, 2014
  • 09:48 AM
  • 183 views

Children’s effect on language

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

  It seems that children can invent language, but adults cannot and they only invent ‘pidgins’. Languages once invented also are re-made by each generation’s learning of them. So it may be that languages carry the marks of how children think and communicate. A recent paper by Clay and others (citation below) investigates this idea. […]... Read more »

  • June 25, 2014
  • 08:41 AM
  • 273 views

Can fMRI be trusted?

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

  The use of brain images is often criticized. A recent article by M Farah looks at what ‘the kernals of truth’ behind the critiques are and how safe we are to trust the images. (citation below). She is concerned by the confusion of legitimate worries about imaging and false ones. The first criticism that […]... Read more »

  • June 22, 2014
  • 10:10 AM
  • 184 views

What is in a smile?

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

  We distinguish genuine from fake smiles, even though we appreciate the polite sort of fake smile in many cases. I have thought it was a settled matter. Smiles are marked by the raising of the corners of the mouth and pulling them back. A broad smile (fake or real) opens the mouth by lowering […]... Read more »

  • June 19, 2014
  • 08:13 AM
  • 210 views

Why do we get pleasure from sad music?

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

  Sadness is a negative emotion; and, we recognize sadness in some music; but yet, we often enjoy listening to sad music. We can be positive about a negative emotion. A recent paper by Kawakami (citation below) differentiates between some hypotheses to explain this contradiction. The hypotheses that the response has to do with musical […]... Read more »

Kawakami, A., Furukawa, K., & Okanoya, K. (2014) Music evokes vicarious emotions in listeners. Frontiers in Psychology. DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00431  

  • May 2, 2014
  • 09:02 AM
  • 374 views

Going up and coming down

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

  Most people think of speaking as a top-down process and listening as a bottom-up one. So if I say something, the assumption is: I have an idea, it is put into words then commands to muscles, and the sounds of the words come out of my mouth. All is top-down, driven from a high-level […]... Read more »

  • April 26, 2014
  • 10:33 AM
  • 292 views

Ravens can play politics

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

Ravens are often featured in mythology – spirit, god, creator, trickster, fortune teller and so on – heroes and villains. They are one of the most intelligent birds. A recent paper by Massen et al (citation below) shows that they are even more remarkable than science has so far shown. The social brain hypothesis is […]... Read more »

  • April 23, 2014
  • 06:48 AM
  • 615 views

Why are some syllables preferred?

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

 In a recent paper by Berent and others (citation below) they investigate language universals in syllable structure. Their argument goes: there is a preference for certain syllables over others across languages and even in people whose language does not include those syllables; a set of four syllables which do not occur in English shows this […]... Read more »

Berent, I., Pan, H., Zhao, X., Epstein, J., Bennett, M., Deshpande, V., Seethamraju, R., & Stern, E. (2014) Language Universals Engage Broca's Area. PLoS ONE, 9(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0095155  

  • April 11, 2014
  • 05:59 AM
  • 303 views

Don’t forget the cerebellum

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

Many theories of humanness rely on a simple idea that the cerebral cortex is enlarged in humans relative to other primates and in primates relative to other mammals. So it must be the cerebral cortex that is the important part of the brain, giving us our smarts and our skills. What is often overlooked is […]... Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 06:07 AM
  • 535 views

Knowing your grandmother

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

There is a spectrum of ways in which the brain may hold concepts that range from very localized to very distributed, and there is little agreement of where along that spectrum various concepts are held. At the one end is the ultimate local storage: a single ‘grandmother’ neuron that recognizes your grandmother in matter how […]... Read more »

  • April 5, 2014
  • 07:11 AM
  • 257 views

Curious publicity

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

Our conscious image of what we are seeing usually appears complete; it is the whole visual field. This is an illusion. The image is built up from many narrower views of parts of the scene that we attend to in rapid succession. Our visual system also establishes a knowledge of the general balance of the […]... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.