Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

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The mission of SMR is to objectively summarize and describe the clinical relevance of research articles related to basic science, translational research, and clinical research that may be relevant to students and professionals interested in sports medicine. Furthermore, SMR aims to provide a forum for clinicians, researchers, and students in sports medicine-related fields to discuss the clinical relevance of new research.

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  • September 3, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 1,022 views

Fear of Reinjury or Knee Pain May Inhibit Full Return to Sport Following an ACL Reconstruction

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Following an ACL reconstruction, persistent knee pain and/or fear of reinjury may contribute to whether or not a patient will return to their preinjury level of activity.
... Read more »

  • August 29, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 894 views

PRP Injections for Chronic Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

by Michelle Noreski in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Despite its popularity as a promising new treatment option, the use of PRP injection for rotator cuff tendinopathy did not result in improved pain or functional outcome when compared to placebo injection... Read more »

  • August 26, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 724 views

Cartilage Adaptation after ACL Injury

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Cartilage adaption is detectable approximately 2 years follow-up. In this time many changes which occur to the cartilage are a progression of the blunt trauma which the joint is subject to following injury.... Read more »

  • August 21, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 677 views

ACL Injuries May Lead to Greater Changes in Cartilage Turnover

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

While young physically-active cadets experience biochemical changes that reflect cartilage turnover during a four-year period, a cadet with an ACL injury may have more pronounced changes. These changes may provide insight for detecting individuals at risk for OA and developing interventions to prevent this.... Read more »

Svoboda SJ, Harvey TM, Owens BD, Brechue WF, Tarwater PM, & Cameron KL. (2013) Changes in Serum Biomarkers of Cartilage Turnover After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. PMID: 23831890  

  • August 19, 2013
  • 05:00 AM
  • 1,033 views

Fish Oil Benefits Your Joints, Heart, and BRAIN....Oh My!

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Pre-injury supplementation with omega-3-fatty acids may improve cognitive and physiologic recovery following brain injury.... Read more »

Wang T, Van KC, Gavitt BJ, Grayson JK, Lu YC, Lyeth BG, & Pichakron KO. (2013) Effect of fish oil supplementation in a rat model of multiple mild traumatic brain injuries. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience. PMID: 23835930  

  • August 14, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 877 views

Posttraumatic Migraine as a Predictor of Recovery and Cognitive Impairment After Sport-related Concussion

by Andrew W. Albano, Jr. DO and Marc I. Harwood, MD in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Headache with post-traumatic migraine symptoms (nausea, photosensitivity, phonosensitivity) may be clinical predictors for prolonged recovery among patients with sport-related concussion.... Read more »

Kontos AP, Elbin RJ, Lau B, Simensky S, Freund B, French J, & Collins MW. (2013) Posttraumatic migraine as a predictor of recovery and cognitive impairment after sport-related concussion. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 41(7), 1497-504. PMID: 23698389  

  • August 12, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 824 views

Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors Among Football Players

by Michelle Noreski, DO and Marc I. Harwood, MD in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Elevated body mass index and percent body fat predict for the presence of several cardiovascular risk factors for metabolic syndrome in college and high school football players. Increased activity levels in these athletes does not necessarily protect against these risk factors.... Read more »

Steffes GD, Megura AE, Adams J, Claytor RP, Ward RM, Horn TS, & Potteiger JA. (2013) Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors in High School and NCAA Division I Football Players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 27(7), 1749-57. PMID: 22996023  

  • August 5, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 930 views

Better Attitudes May Improve Concussion Reporting Habits

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Over half of the athletes recalled concussive events in this study but did not report their problem to their supervising adult. Additionally, both concussion knowledge and attitude may play a role in reporting concussive events.

Many athletes continue to practice and play games while experiencing concussion-related symptoms. Knowledge and attitude regarding concussions are changeable factors that may contribute to concussion-reporting and care-seeking behaviors; however, fe........ Read more »

  • August 2, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 912 views

Pediatrician Concussion Management Strategies and Medication Use

by Stephen Stache in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: A vast majority of pediatricians who care for patients with concussions follow available treatment guidelines, use medications as part of their treatment plan, use neuropsychological testing, and desire additional training in the management of sports-related concussion.... Read more »

  • July 31, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 888 views

Phase of Menstrual Cycle may be a Risk Factor for ACL Tears in Female Athletes

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A recreational female skier may be more likely to suffer an ACL injury in the pre-ovulatory phase than during the luteal phase of her menstrual cycle. This may provide more evidence that female hormone fluctuations should be considered when we try to reduce the risk of ACL tears among females.... Read more »

  • July 24, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 876 views

Potentially Modifiable Osteoarthritis Risk Factors

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Osteoarthritis prevention programs could focus on certain risk factors, such as joint injury, obesity, and occupational activities.

Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint disease, affects millions of adults worldwide. There are many potential risk factors for OA, including several of interest in sports medicine: obesity, repetitive tasks (physical or occupational activity), and joint injury. It is important to understand what modifiable risk factors may exist so that w........ Read more »

  • July 22, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 1,084 views

Preliminary Baseline ImPACT Data for Those with ADHD or Learning Disabilities

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Athletes with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or learning disabilities have lower baseline ImPACT neurocognitive scores compared to athletes without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and learning disabilities.

Developmental, behavioral, and learning disabilities affect approximately 1 in 6 children in the United States. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suffer more head injuries compared with those without the disorder. Unfort........ Read more »

  • July 17, 2013
  • 12:04 AM
  • 796 views

Pronated and Neutral Wins the Race…or at Least Keeps the Runners in it

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Novice runners with pronated feet may sustain fewer injuries than neutral feet, when they wear neutral running shoes.

Among runners foot pronation is believed to be a strong predictor for athletic injury. While certain athletic shoes are commonly prescribed for individuals with pronated and supinated feet, there has been conflicting evidence to support this. Therefore, Neilsen and colleagues completed a prospective cohort study “to investigate if running distance to f........ Read more »

  • July 12, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 806 views

Higher Heading Counts May Impair Memory and Brain Tissue

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Heading was associated with abnormal white-matter microstructure and poorer neurocognitive performance. History of concussion was not associated with altered structure.

Long-term cognitive impairments following repeated sport-related head injury is a major concern. However, the role of subconcussive impacts from soccer heading as an additional mechanism of cumulative brain injury has not been well examined. If repetitive heading causes adverse effects on the brain there cou........ Read more »

  • July 10, 2013
  • 05:00 AM
  • 1,004 views

Clinical Prediction Rule for Meniscal Tears?

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Joint line tenderness and McMurray's tests used together do not necessarily improve meniscal lesion diagnosis.

Clinical prediction rules, such as the Ottawa Ankle Rules, improve clinical care and reduce healthcare costs from unnecessary diagnostic imaging. Knee meniscal clinical tests may be coupled together to yield similar results; however, the accuracy of combining meniscal special tests remains unclear. Therefore, the authors investigated the accuracy of joint l........ Read more »

  • July 3, 2013
  • 12:04 AM
  • 758 views

Diagnostic Methods Using a Computer-based Cognitive Test May Lead to False-Positives

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Computer-based neurocognitive testing methods of deciphering if a patient has a concussion may lead to false-positives, thus a gold standard is still needed.

Baseline computer-based cognitive testing is commonplace in athletics; however, more information is needed regarding the validity of comparing post-injury results with baseline performance. Therefore, Roebuck-Spencer and colleagues completed a study of 8,002 military service members (91% male, ~27 years old) to examine........ Read more »

  • July 1, 2013
  • 12:04 AM
  • 1,726 views

What is the Best Treatment Option for Calcific Tendinitis of the Rotator Cuff?

by Stephen Thomas in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Barbotage treatment enhances functional outcome measures and reabsorption of the calcific deposit in patients with rotator cuff calcific tendinitis.

Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff typically occurs in patients between 30 to 50 years of age and can cause significant pain. There are several treatment options involving injections or physical therapy; however, there is no consensus to a preferred treatment; nor have there been any randomized controlled trails to evalu........ Read more »

  • June 20, 2013
  • 12:04 AM
  • 1,076 views

Undiagnosed Concussions Are Associated with Loss of Consciousness

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Over 30% of athletes reported a previously undiagnosed concussion and these athletes may be at risk for more severe symptoms after a future impact.

Many athletes fail to report their concussion signs and symptoms (Kauet, 2003 Labotz,2005; McCrea,2004; Williamson, 2006), which predisposes them to sustaining a second blow when the brain is still recovering from the first impact. However, we still don’t know how common undiagnosed concussions may be. Identifying under-re........ Read more »

Meehan WP 3rd, Mannix RC, Oʼbrien MJ, & Collins MW. (2013) The Prevalence of Undiagnosed Concussions in Athletes. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. PMID: 23727697  

  • June 18, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 942 views

It's Fun to Play with the Y- and C- Graft

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: While both the Y-graft and C-graft effectively stabilized the patellofemoral joint, the patients who received the Y-graft had significantly better subjective outcome scores than the patients who received the C-graft.

Patients who endure a patellofemoral dislocation are often plagued with patellofemoral instability and frequent re-injury. While multiple methods of patellar fixation exist, a gold-standard does not. Therefore, Kang and colleagues performed a randomized trial t........ Read more »

  • June 12, 2013
  • 12:04 AM
  • 892 views

Fatigue Causes Decline in Lower Extremity Biomechanics

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: As the body fatigues there may be apparent compensatory strategies employed, however, lower extremity biomechanics deteriorate as fatigue becomes greater. This may have implications for injury prevention program implementation.

Lower extremity injuries (e.g., anterior cruciate ligament [ACL], ankle sprains) tend to occur later in games or practices when athletes may be fatigued; hence, fatigue may increase susceptibility to lower extremity injuries. However, there is only........ Read more »

Cortes, N., Greska, E., Kollock, R., Ambegaonkar, J., & Onate, J. (2013) Changes in Lower Extremity Biomechanics Due to a Short-Term Fatigue Protocol. Journal of Athletic Training, 48(3), 306-313. DOI: 10.4085/1062-6050-48.2.03  

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