Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

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The mission of SMR is to objectively summarize and describe the clinical relevance of research articles related to basic science, translational research, and clinical research that may be relevant to students and professionals interested in sports medicine. Furthermore, SMR aims to provide a forum for clinicians, researchers, and students in sports medicine-related fields to discuss the clinical relevance of new research.

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  • November 17, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 545 views

Tag Us In! What Do Coaches Know About Exertional Heat Stroke and the Role of the Athletic Trainer?

by Yanira Dawson, Crystal Petrus, Savannah Kuester in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

High school football coaches are confident in their ability to handle exertional heat stroke but their knowledge is limited in this area. The coaches value and understand the role of athletic trainers.... Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 603 views

Patellar Autograft May be Better to Avoid Revision

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A patient with a patellar autograft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has less of a chance of a need for ACL revision surgery than patients receiving a hamstring autograft. ... Read more »

  • November 11, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 623 views

Prophylactic Treatment of Joint Stiffness

by Kristin Gibson and Daniel Clark in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Three agents that target different aspects of the inflammatory pathways decreased joint stiffness after joint trauma in rats.... Read more »

Efird, W., Kellam, P., Yeazell, S., Weinhold, P., & Dahners, L. (2014) An evaluation of prophylactic treatments to prevent post traumatic joint stiffness. Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 32(11), 1520-1524. DOI: 10.1002/jor.22700  

  • November 10, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 594 views

Measuring Lower Extremity Kinematics? Yep, They Have an App For That

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A tablet application is a promising, reliable tool to capture objective landing kinematics. Intra-rater reliability is good to excellent with an average of 6 trials. Inter-rater reliability is fair to excellent depending on the level of experience.... Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 646 views

Clinical Findings Triumph Baseline MRI Findings in Predicting Hamstring Re-injury Just After Return to Play

by Samantha Sisson, Grace Brooks in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Key predictors of hamstring re-injury are higher number of previous hamstring injuries, more degrees of active knee extension deficit, isometric knee flexion force deficit at 15°, and the presence of localized discomfort on posterior thigh palpation just after return to play (RTP).... Read more »

  • November 5, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 813 views

Cool It Down Before You Work It Out

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Among knees with a history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and chronic quadriceps dysfunction, the application of cryotherapy prior to performing exercises may help mitigate arthrogenic muscle inhibition and improve muscle function.... Read more »

  • November 3, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 902 views

See All About It! New Set of Tests to Add to the Concussion Assessment Protocol

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The vestibular/ocular motor screening (VOMS) is valid assessment to identify young patients with concussions.... Read more »

Mucha A, Collins MW, Elbin RJ, Furman JM, Troutman-Enseki C, DeWolf RM, Marchetti G, & Kontos AP. (2014) A Brief Vestibular/Ocular Motor Screening (VOMS) Assessment to Evaluate Concussions: Preliminary Findings. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(10), 2479-86. PMID: 25106780  

  • October 29, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 704 views

Autograft or Allograft: Autograft May be Better for Revision

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Autograft selection for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) revision has better outcomes post surgery compared with allografts. ... Read more »

MARS Group, ., Wright, R., Huston, L., Haas, A., Spindler, K., Nwosu, S., Allen, C., Anderson, A., Cooper, D., DeBerardino, T.... (2014) Effect of Graft Choice on the Outcome of Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) Cohort. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(10), 2301-2310. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514549005  

  • October 27, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 607 views

Concussions May Make You Older but Definitely Not Wiser

by Adam B. Rosen, PhD, ATC and Catherine E. Lewis in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Measurable declines in neurocognitive function in older, clinically normal retired athletes may be explained by changes in white matter integrity in those with a previous history of concussion.... Read more »

  • October 24, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 688 views

Who is at Risk for Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome?

by Hallie Labrador MD, MS in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Risk of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is associated with increased body mass index, navicular drop, ankle plantarflexion range of motion (ROM) and hip external rotation ROM.... Read more »

  • October 22, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 725 views

Knee Cartilage Changes Following ACL Rupture

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Following an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture overall cartilage thickness in the tibiofemoral joint increased at an average of 0.4% per year. Patients under 25 years of age showed greater cartilage thickening than older patients.... Read more »

  • October 20, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 689 views

Novel NSAID has Differential Tissue Effects in the Treatment of Chronic Rotator Cuff Repairs

by Sarah Ilkhanipour Rooney in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Licofelone, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory treatment, has tissue-specific effects. In a rotator cuff repair rat model, this drug reduces functional muscle regeneration but improves tendon healing.... Read more »

  • October 15, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 569 views

ACL Reconstruction Provides Not So Good Long-Term Outcomes

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

There is very little evidence that an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). ... Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 733 views

Fatigue Does Not Have A Leg To Stand On

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Soccer players have impaired postural control after a fatigue-inducing task. The single-leg balance impairment was related to repeated sprint ability performance, which suggests that an athlete who was less fatigued by a sprinting task had less balance impairment.... Read more »

Pau, M., Ibba, G., & Attene, G. (2014) Fatigue-Induced Balance Impairment in Young Soccer Players. Journal of Athletic Training, 49(4), 454-461. DOI: 10.4085/1062-6050-49.2.12  

  • October 8, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 779 views

Stronger May not be Better in Decreasing the Risk of High Magnitude Head Impacts in Football

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Football players with greater cervical neck muscle strength and size were as likely to sustain larger head impacts as their peers. Football players who had greater cervical stiffness and an ability to decrease the displacement of their head following perturbation were less likely to sustain a moderate and severe head impacts.... Read more »

Schmidt, J., Guskiewicz, K., Blackburn, J., Mihalik, J., Siegmund, G., & Marshall, S. (2014) The Influence of Cervical Muscle Characteristics on Head Impact Biomechanics in Football. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(9), 2056-2066. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514536685  

  • October 1, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 678 views

Painful Arc in Flexion and Forward Scapular Posture = SLAP Surgery Recommendation

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The presence of a painful flexion arc and forward scapular posture seem to be relatively accurate in predicting who will need surgery for a SLAP tear after trying 6 weeks of rehabilitation. While this rule seems promising, more investigation is needed, and clinical decisions should be made on an individual basis.... Read more »

  • September 29, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 641 views

Parents, Where are You Getting Your Concussion Information?

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Parents of young athletes (5 to 15 year olds) lack of knowledge regarding concussion definition, signs and symptoms, and mechanisms. We need to implement more concussion education programs for parents of young athletes.... Read more »

  • September 24, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 718 views

Performance May Not Mirror Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Following autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), performance based and patient-reported outcomes can be valuable for measuring success. Patient-reported outcomes were better at all post-operative time points while performance-based measurements decreased for the first 6 months following ACI.... Read more »

  • September 22, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 877 views

Statins: Lower Cholesterol and Improve Tendon Healing While You’re at it!

by Katie Reuther in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Statins enhance rotator cuff healing following repair through stimulation of the acute inflammatory phase. Statins may be a useful modality to improve tendon healing and reduce re-tear rates.... Read more »

  • September 17, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 752 views

Not So Competitive Return Rates to Activity Following ACL Reconstruction

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Only 55% of athletes returned to competitive sport following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The debate continues as to whether hamstring or patellar tendon autograft is better. However, factors that may favor return to competitive sport include younger age, male gender, elite sport, and a positive psychological response. ... Read more »

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