Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Visit Blog Website

607 posts · 568,539 views

The mission of SMR is to objectively summarize and describe the clinical relevance of research articles related to basic science, translational research, and clinical research that may be relevant to students and professionals interested in sports medicine. Furthermore, SMR aims to provide a forum for clinicians, researchers, and students in sports medicine-related fields to discuss the clinical relevance of new research.

Sort by: Latest Post, Most Popular

View by: Condensed, Full

  • December 16, 2011
  • 12:20 AM
  • 5,637 views

Shoulder force couples – How do they function throughout rehab exercises?

by Mark Rice in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Swanik et al. investigated muscle coactivation levels and coactivation patterns of the subscapularis, infraspinatus, and teres minor throughout the range of motion (ROM) of 4 commonly utilized therapeutic exercises.... Read more »

  • December 13, 2011
  • 12:08 AM
  • 4,690 views

Long-Term Effect of Physical Training as Treatment for Overuse Injury

by Hallie Labrador in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The purpose of this follow-up trial was to revisit the original subjects of a randomized controlled trial studying the impact of a training program on adductor-related groin pain and test whether the effects were still statistically significant 8 to 12 years later.... Read more »

  • December 15, 2011
  • 12:08 AM
  • 4,689 views

Measuring Brain Activity to Track Recovery from Sport-Related Concussion

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The purpose of this study was to follow recovery from a concussion within athletes using an index based on changes in quantitative electroencephalographic (EEG; brain activity) that was previously developed among an independent Emergency Department sample of head-injured subjects with traumatic brain injuries. ... Read more »

  • December 14, 2011
  • 12:08 AM
  • 4,639 views

Risk Factors for Poor Long-Term Outcomes among Knees with ACL Reconstructions

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of osteoarthritis (OA) in patients that have undergone ACL reconstruction utilizing the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft technique as well as to identify factors associated with poor radiographic and patient-centered outcomes.... Read more »

  • December 12, 2011
  • 12:08 AM
  • 4,286 views

Radiographic Prevalence of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Collegiate Football Players

by Meghan Miller in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The purpose of this study was to use radiographic imaging to quantify the prevalence of FAI in asymptomatic football players.... Read more »

Kapron AL, Anderson AE, Aoki SK, Phillips LG, Petron DJ, Toth R, & Peters CL. (2011) Radiographic prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement in collegiate football players: AAOS Exhibit Selection. The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American volume, 93(19). PMID: 22005872  

  • March 27, 2012
  • 12:04 AM
  • 2,858 views

Long Head of the Biceps Issues– Cut it or Move it?

by Mark Rice in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Slenker et al. conducted a systematic review to determine the clinical effectiveness of biceps tenotomy versus tenodesis.... Read more »

Slenker NR, Lawson K, Ciccotti MG, Dodson CC, & Cohen SB. (2012) Biceps Tenotomy Versus Tenodesis: Clinical Outcomes. Arthroscopy. PMID: 22284407  

  • January 19, 2012
  • 12:04 AM
  • 2,625 views

Can Anabolic Steroids be Used Therapeutically After Injury?

by Stephen Thomas in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Gerber et al. examined if anabolic steroids would lessen the muscular maladaptations caused by chronic rotator cuff tears.... Read more »

  • April 16, 2012
  • 12:03 AM
  • 2,468 views

Ultrasound as an Evaluation Tool of Bone Stress Injuries

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The purpose of this study was to determine if therapeutic ultrasound is an accurate method for early diagnosis of bone stress injuries compared to MRI. ... Read more »

Papalada A, Malliaropoulos N, Tsitas K, Kiritsi O, Padhiar N, Del Buono A, & Maffulli N. (2012) Ultrasound as a primary evaluation tool of bone stress injuries in elite track and field athletes. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 40(4), 915-9. PMID: 22366519  

  • April 23, 2012
  • 12:04 AM
  • 2,353 views

Is Exercise Just as Effective as Surgery for Degenerative Meniscal Tears?

by Kris Fayock, MD and Peter Vitanzo, MD in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Middle-aged patients with knee pain and impaired knee function of unclear cause often get magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their knee that shows a meniscal tear. Treatment of non-traumatic, degenerative medial meniscal tears is controversial, particularly in patients with underlying arthritic changes of the knee. It poses the question of whether or not conservative treatment (rest, NSAID’s, physical therapy, injection therapy, etc) versus arthroscopic surgery right away is more appropri........ Read more »

  • February 15, 2013
  • 12:04 AM
  • 2,324 views

Which is Better for ACL Surgery: Right Away, Later, or Never?

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears occur frequently in athletics, and carry with it the potential risk of osteoarthritis (OA). ACL injury is often treated with surgical reconstruction in an effort to reduce the risk of secondary injuries and progression to OA. Some people insist that an ACL reconstruction is needed as quickly as possible; however, the timing of surgery or the lack of surgery on longer-term outcomes has yet to be determined. The purpose of this extended follow-up of a rand........ Read more »

  • December 12, 2012
  • 12:01 AM
  • 2,305 views

Can Laser Therapy be used to Treat Meniscal Injuries?

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A meniscal injury is the most common cause of symptomatic knee pain. Due to the inability of the meniscus to heal, current management of these injuries involves symptomatic management, and surgery as needed. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for soft tissue injuries has become increasingly apparent in recent years, with claims of reduction in pain, inflammation, as well as accelerated healing time. It is currently being used for these possible benefits; however, its effectiveness for treating men........ Read more »

Malliaropoulos N, Kiritsi O, Tsitas K, Christodoulou D, Akritidou A, Del Buono A, & Maffulli N. (2012) Low-level laser therapy in meniscal pathology: a double-blinded placebo-controlled trial. Lasers in Medical Science. PMID: 23093133  

  • March 30, 2012
  • 12:04 AM
  • 2,293 views

Patellar Tendon versus Hamstring Autografts: 15 Years After Reconstruction

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Leys and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort study to compare the outcomes of patellar tendon (PT) and hamstring tendon (HT) autografts assessed at 2, 5, 7, 10, and 15 years post-surgery.... Read more »

  • October 21, 2013
  • 12:05 AM
  • 2,147 views

Should Soccer be Played on a Grass or is a Synthetic Surface the Better Choice?

by Carolin Suon in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Within a five-year period, collegiate women’s soccer players that competed on FieldTurf surfaces suffered less injuries compared with games on natural grass.... Read more »

  • March 20, 2012
  • 12:04 AM
  • 2,130 views

Fetal Wellbeing May be Compromised During Strenuous Exercise among Pregnant Elite Athletes

by Hallie Labrador, Marc Harwood in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

This study aimed to measure the impact of strenuous treadmill running on fetal wellbeing and uteroplacental bloodflow during the second trimester.... Read more »

  • February 6, 2012
  • 12:06 AM
  • 2,118 views

Loss of Normal Knee Motion After ACL Reconstruction is Associated with Degenerative Changes

by Jeffrey B. Driban in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Shelbourne et al. assessed whether the prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis was higher in patients who had abnormal knee ROM after an ACL reconstruction compared to patients with normal knee ROM; even when controlling for meniscal or cartilage damage.... Read more »

  • April 20, 2012
  • 12:04 AM
  • 1,986 views

Aggressive versus Limited Early Passive Exercises After Rotator Cuff Repair

by Stephen Thomas in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Rotator cuff tears are common injuries to the shoulder and typically require surgical repair. The success of the repair has had mixed results due to several controllable and uncontrollable factors. One factor that is controllable is the rehabilitation following surgery. It is currently not known if more early aggressive motion or a more limited early motion rehabilitation protocol is more effective for proper rotator cuff healing. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the clinica........ Read more »

  • September 28, 2012
  • 12:04 AM
  • 1,980 views

New Evidence Supporting ACL Injury Prevention Warm-up Programs

by Stephen Stache, MD and Marc I. Harwood, MD in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Medications that improve the transmission of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, have been shown to improve functional outcomes in animal models of concussion. Amantadine, a dopaminergic agent, has recently been shown through preliminary research and anecdotal evidence to improve post-concussion cognitive function and symptoms such as attention, concentration, impulsivity, and fatigue. This retrospective study by Reddy, et al. examined the influence of amantadine on the improvement of cognitive defi........ Read more »

  • September 24, 2012
  • 12:04 AM
  • 1,954 views

Do NSAID’s Delay Healing in Stress Fractures?

by Kris Fayock in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a commonly used medication for pain related to musculoskeletal injuries that can be obtained both over the counter and with a prescription. They act by inhibiting the effects of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which play a role in bone biology, specifically bone resorption by COX-2. Stress fractures are common injuries that affect many people of all ages and level of activity. There are studies that show negative effects of NSAIDs on complete f........ Read more »

  • March 13, 2012
  • 12:06 AM
  • 1,941 views

Predictive Factors for Ankle Sprain

by Katherine Morrison in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether certain intrinsic factors (postural control, ankle ROM, motor imagery, functional instability, history of previous sprain, and body mass index [BMI]) could predict ankle sprains in healthy, active people. A total of 121 active University students participated in this study.... Read more »

  • January 25, 2012
  • 12:05 AM
  • 1,932 views

Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation for Treatment of Cartilage Defects of the Knee: What Predicts the Need for Reintervention?

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors associated with the need for a second (corrective) surgery after ACI.... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.