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Musings of a Scepticemic Oslerphile.

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  • July 7, 2014
  • 11:05 AM
  • 251 views

Florida Clampdown on Pain Pills Lowers Drug-Related Mortality

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Ever since I started working with the homeless youth of Delhi, I have noticed their drug and substance dependence issues and how, despite knowing the ill-effects, they have not been able to get out from under the chemical spell. Thus, when I came across a short report in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports that Florida…... Read more »

Johnson H, Paulozzi L, Porucznik C, Mack K, Herter B, & Hal Johnson Consulting and Division of Disease Control and Health Promotion, Florida Department of Health. (2014) Decline in drug overdose deaths after state policy changes - Florida, 2010-2012. MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, 63(26), 569-74. PMID: 24990490  

  • July 7, 2014
  • 10:33 AM
  • 222 views

MERS CoV: Can it spread from camels to man?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS CoV) is a novel single stranded RNA virus that has been doing the rounds in the Middle East, bits of Europe and North America. Given our experiences the last time we had a new respiratory virus (remember the pandemic?), things have moved rather fast this time once the…... Read more »

Azhar, E., El-Kafrawy, S., Farraj, S., Hassan, A., Al-Saeed, M., Hashem, A., & Madani, T. (2014) Evidence for Camel-to-Human Transmission of MERS Coronavirus. New England Journal of Medicine, 370(26), 2499-2505. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1401505  

  • June 21, 2014
  • 07:45 AM
  • 294 views

West Nile Virus and Polio-like Syndromes: An Emerging Threat

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

While the whole nation has been gripped by a media-induced frenzy about the fatal effects of the so-called “litchi virus” (do not get me started on this! This issue deserves a whole post of its own!), another virus-related news has quietly slipped beneath the radars of the cumulative hysteria. This article in the Times of India […]... Read more »

  • October 3, 2013
  • 04:34 PM
  • 631 views

Exhibitionism in Medical Education: The Brindley Lecture – Heralding A Sexual Revolution

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The first boom in treatment for male erectile dysfunction came in the 1920s and 1930 when the Russian-origin French surgeon Serge Abramovitch Voronoff started to prescribe surgical implantation of monkey testicles in the human scrotum to augment sexual prowess. This gained quite a bit of fan following for a couple of decades and brough Voronoff […]... Read more »

  • June 22, 2013
  • 01:43 PM
  • 1,026 views

[Warning: NSFW] Sex and the CT (MRI, Actually)

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Disclaimer: This post contains a lot of explicit images and one explicit video as well. The language is also not suited for the run of the mill blog, but in the spirit of writing unhindered, I have edited myself as little as possible. If there is a possibility that graphic references to (human) sexual activities offend […]... Read more »

  • January 8, 2013
  • 11:37 AM
  • 903 views

The USA Dream for IMGs: Coming to an end? Analysing the 2012 Match

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

My attention was drawn to an article in the JAMA today (1) by one of my friends who is actively pursuing the USMLE route. And after reading this, I guess I have to admit that one now has to make haste in order to prevent waste. Now I have long been wanting to write about [...]... Read more »

Traverso G, & McMahon GT. (2012) Residency training and international medical graduates: coming to America no more. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 308(21), 2193-4. PMID: 23212494  

  • September 21, 2012
  • 04:20 PM
  • 673 views

William Gosset: A True Student

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Today I attended a Basic Epidemiology class meant for the undergraduate students as I thought it would be good to brush up on my basic knowledge. The topics for the day were Hypothesis Testing and An Introduction to Randomized Controlled Trials, both pretty important ones, no matter which level you are studying at. What struck [...]... Read more »

  • February 16, 2012
  • 05:02 AM
  • 810 views

Remembering Tinsley Harrison, the Oslerian Physician

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The past few weeks have been very demanding on me and I have not had the best of times, either on the personal or on the professional front. So, today, I took a break from the usual drudgery of life and decided to take a step back and remind myself of the bigger picture of [...]... Read more »

  • February 14, 2012
  • 01:51 AM
  • 956 views

Valentine’s Day Kills!

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

I wish all my readers a very Happy Valentine’s Day and though I am spending it in a rather sad and loser-like fashion, I hope y’all make a day out of it! I know this is the day when pink sappiness overrules our lives and the loveless ones like myself feel rather left out of [...]... Read more »

  • February 7, 2012
  • 04:00 AM
  • 1,082 views

Thoughts on World Cancer Day: Part I–Unraveling Yuvraj Singh’s Cancer

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Sorry for missing the train on this one. February 4th is the World Cancer Day and is one of the public health days that could do with some more propaganda in the public eye. I was so caught up with work and studies it just passed me by and I could not even get the [...]... Read more »

  • November 26, 2011
  • 10:26 AM
  • 968 views

Earworms: Kolaveri Di and the Pathogenesis of a Musical Malaise

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Like the rest of the nation (and some would say, the world), I have been asking myself over and over again why this kolaveri kolaveri kolaveri di. And in addition to that I have been asking myself why the heck does this happen to us in the first place. Now if you are not aware [...]... Read more »

  • November 16, 2011
  • 03:55 PM
  • 1,082 views

Penile Cancer: Another Reason to Stop Banging Animals: (Insert Zoophilia Joke)

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

First up, I cannot believe the numbers! This is awe-inspiring. I read the abstract three times in order to convince myself that I was not seeing things. More than the results of the study itself what intrigues me no ends is how the researchers got the participants to open up about screwing with Billy. Billy [...]... Read more »

Zequi SD, Guimarães GC, da Fonseca FP, Ferreira U, de Matheus WE, Reis LO, Aita GA, Glina S, Fanni VS, Perez MD.... (2011) Sex with Animals (SWA): Behavioral Characteristics and Possible Association with Penile Cancer. A Multicenter Study. The journal of sexual medicine. PMID: 22023719  

  • November 10, 2011
  • 09:50 AM
  • 1,076 views

Trendelenberg vs Trendelenburg: What’s in a name?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

I have a slew of exams lined up and am recovering from a (suspected) repetitive stress injury of the right wrist. Combined, they have managed to keep me offline long enough to stay off the blog. But since yesterday my wrist has been feeling a little more supple and hence, this post. Not much of [...]... Read more »

  • October 31, 2011
  • 03:54 AM
  • 1,064 views

Trick or Treatment: Do Doctors Encourage Poor Patient Behaviors?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Happy Pumpkin Day folks, and to celebrate this day of weird encounters, I am going to reel off a list of the commonest peeves I have experienced in the past couple of years I have been doing Medicine. There are obvious gaps in the stories, and many are not even unique to me, but I [...]... Read more »

Moseley, J., O'Malley, K., Petersen, N., Menke, T., Brody, B., Kuykendall, D., Hollingsworth, J., Ashton, C., & Wray, N. (2002) A Controlled Trial of Arthroscopic Surgery for Osteoarthritis of the Knee. New England Journal of Medicine, 347(2), 81-88. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa013259  

  • October 30, 2011
  • 01:36 AM
  • 1,013 views

Charles Beevor: The Sign of a “Bloody” Jerk

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Forgive the hyperbolic title. Do not take offense and read on before hating on me. Thanks. Please note the post script for added justification for this inflammatory title, if you so feel. Thanks. Now on with the main show! Charles Edward Beevor is probably the most well known for the eponymous neurological sign in his [...]... Read more »

Pearce, J. (2005) Beevor’s Sign. European Neurology, 53(4), 208-209. DOI: 10.1159/000086731  

  • October 17, 2011
  • 02:59 AM
  • 1,040 views

House MD 8×02: Transplant

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

As big a fan of the House MD show I am, let me start off with the disclaimer that I consider this to be one of the worst ever episodes of House MD to come on air. EVER! And that … Continue reading →... Read more »

Steen S, Ingemansson R, Eriksson L, Pierre L, Algotsson L, Wierup P, Liao Q, Eyjolfsson A, Gustafsson R, & Sjöberg T. (2007) First human transplantation of a nonacceptable donor lung after reconditioning ex vivo. The Annals of thoracic surgery, 83(6), 2191-4. PMID: 17532422  

  • August 15, 2011
  • 11:26 AM
  • 2,544 views

Answer: MediQuiz #2: The Rhythm of Life

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Yeah, once again, almost everyone got it right. There are few songs that tend to stick in your head as much as stayin’ alive does, and indeed, it is just the right beat to make your CPR go along with. … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 2, 2011
  • 12:13 AM
  • 1,288 views

Are patients really “worse off” with older docs?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

In what appears to be a largely counter intuitive result, research by the American Journal of Medicine has unearthed that patients end up faring worse when treated by older doctors or more experienced doctors. This Reuters article delves into the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 24, 2011
  • 01:01 PM
  • 913 views

Blogs/Twitter in Medical Publications: Too Unreliable to Quote or A Change Waiting to Happen?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Just a few days ago, I was co-authoring a submission for a journal on the issue of handling social media with care and needed to cite a bunch of blogs and non-traditional online sources of information (including Tweets and Friendfeed … Continue reading →... Read more »

Mandavilli A. (2011) Peer review: Trial by Twitter. Nature, 469(7330), 286-7. PMID: 21248816  

  • July 22, 2011
  • 11:48 AM
  • 1,415 views

Move Over Penis Captivus, Cello Scrotum and Guitar Nipple, we have TEXTER’S THUMB!

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The medical mind has pondered and pondered on the existence of maladies of the body and mind which are real, and sometimes, not so real. While the cynics say that the latter exist only in the realms of medical lore, … Continue reading →... Read more »

Walkinshaw, E. (2011) Thumbs up and down. Canadian Medical Association Journal. DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.109-3911  

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