the Node

Visit Blog Website

82 posts · 76,729 views

the Node is a community blog for and by developmental biologists.

Eva Amsen
15 posts

Linda
4 posts

Erin Campbell
26 posts

Ret Mutant
1 post

the Node
3 posts

Paul O'Neill
1 post

Victoria Hatch
0 posts

Sort by: Latest Post, Most Popular

View by: Condensed, Full

  • August 4, 2014
  • 07:31 AM
  • 93 views

‘‘Transit amplification in the cerebellum evolved via a heterochronic shift in NeuroD1 expression’’

by Thomas Butts in the Node

They are a mouthful, paper titles, sometimes. This is exactly the sort of title that would have made me ignore it in the days when I worked on the evolution of Hox genes. But I now find myself frequently justifying to people who work on evolution why the nervous system deserves attention, and of justifying […]... Read more »

  • July 3, 2014
  • 07:55 AM
  • 135 views

Goalward-bound: why biological research is like football

by Christele Gonneau in the Node

The 2014 FIFA World Cup has mesmerised football fans all around the world over the past weeks, but besides just the fancy footwork on display, we’ve also seen some amazing athleticism. Many of the matches have taken place under scorching, highly humid conditions! Though this might not be foremost in our minds as marvel at […]... Read more »

  • June 24, 2014
  • 08:49 AM
  • 122 views

On segmentation

by Thomas Butts in the Node

‘Increasing knowledge leads to triumphant loss of clarity’ ‘The study of segmentation: that way leads only to madness’ Alfred Romer (1894 – 1973), Director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology and Professor of Biology, Harvard University   Some problems in biology excite such interest as to become symptomatic of a field. This is true, I […]... Read more »

Aguinaldo, A., Turbeville, J., Linford, L., Rivera, M., Garey, J., Raff, R., & Lake, J. (1997) Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods and other moulting animals. Nature, 387(6632), 489-493. DOI: 10.1038/387489a0  

Stollewerk, A., Schoppmeier, M., & Damen, W. (2003) Involvement of Notch and Delta genes in spider segmentation. Nature, 423(6942), 863-865. DOI: 10.1038/nature01682  

Dray, N., Tessmar-Raible, K., Le Gouar, M., Vibert, L., Christodoulou, F., Schipany, K., Guillou, A., Zantke, J., Snyman, H., Behague, J.... (2010) Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Segment Formation in the Annelid Platynereis. Science, 329(5989), 339-342. DOI: 10.1126/science.1188913  

Dias, A., de Almeida, I., Belmonte, J., Glazier, J., & Stern, C. (2014) Somites Without a Clock. Science, 343(6172), 791-795. DOI: 10.1126/science.1247575  

  • June 17, 2014
  • 12:02 PM
  • 129 views

Electrifying news for embryologists

by Elsa Mazari and Aitana Perea-Gomez in the Node

Electroporation: an efficient technique for embryologists During embryonic development, the specification of different cell types giving rise to the future organs involves a precise spatiotemporal regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Studying these processes requires tools to manipulate gene expression locally in the developing embryo.To this aim, embryologists have widely used the technique of […]... Read more »

Fox, M., Esveld, D., Valero, A., Luttge, R., Mastwijk, H., Bartels, P., Berg, A., & Boom, R. (2006) Electroporation of cells in microfluidic devices: a review. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 385(3), 474-485. DOI: 10.1007/s00216-006-0327-3  

Kim, J., Cho, K., Shin, M., Lee, W., Jung, N., Chung, C., & Chang, J. (2008) A novel electroporation method using a capillary and wire-type electrode. Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 23(9), 1353-1360. DOI: 10.1016/j.bios.2007.12.009  

Mazari, E., Zhao, X., Migeotte, I., Collignon, J., Gosse, C., & Perea-Gomez, A. (2014) A microdevice to locally electroporate embryos with high efficiency and reduced cell damage. Development, 141(11), 2349-2359. DOI: 10.1242/dev.106633  

Momose, T., Tonegawa, ., Takeuchi, J., Ogawa, H., Umesono, K., & Yasuda, K. (1999) Efficient targeting of gene expression in chick embryos by microelectroporation. Development, Growth and Differentiation, 41(3), 335-344. DOI: 10.1046/j.1440-169X.1999.413437.x  

Nakamura, H., & Funahashi, J. (2013) Electroporation: Past, present and future. Development, Growth , 55(1), 15-19. DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12012  

Wang, M., Orwar, O., Olofsson, J., & Weber, S. (2010) Single-cell electroporation. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 397(8), 3235-3248. DOI: 10.1007/s00216-010-3744-2  

  • June 17, 2014
  • 04:40 AM
  • 116 views

Nuclear sponges in embryonic stem cells

by kjchalut in the Node

Once upon a time, physicists got curious about the cytoskeleton. They characterised the cytoskeleton – using tools of soft matter, statistical and polymer physics – as a mesoscale material whose physical properties govern its dynamics. They showed that the cytoskeleton is an interconnected scaffold that, depending on the time scale, can behave like a shape-morphing […]... Read more »

Deng, L., Trepat, X., Butler, J., Millet, E., Morgan, K., Weitz, D., & Fredberg, J. (2006) Fast and slow dynamics of the cytoskeleton. Nature Materials, 5(8), 636-640. DOI: 10.1038/nmat1685  

Gardel, M., Schneider, I., Aratyn-Schaus,, Y., & Waterman, C. (2010) Mechanical Integration of Actin and Adhesion Dynamics in Cell Migration. Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology, 26(1), 315-333. DOI: 10.1146/annurev.cellbio.011209.122036  

Swift, J., Ivanovska, I., Buxboim, A., Harada, T., Dingal, P., Pinter, J., Pajerowski, J., Spinler, K., Shin, J., Tewari, M.... (2013) Nuclear Lamin-A Scales with Tissue Stiffness and Enhances Matrix-Directed Differentiation. Science, 341(6149), 1240104-1240104. DOI: 10.1126/science.1240104  

Kind, J., Pagie, L., Ortabozkoyun, H., Boyle, S., de Vries, S., Janssen, H., Amendola, M., Nolen, L., Bickmore, W., & van Steensel, B. (2013) Single-Cell Dynamics of Genome-Nuclear Lamina Interactions. Cell, 153(1), 178-192. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.02.028  

Pagliara, S., Franze, K., McClain, C., Wylde, G., Fisher, C., Franklin, R., Kabla, A., Keyser, U., & Chalut, K. (2014) Auxetic nuclei in embryonic stem cells exiting pluripotency. Nature Materials, 13(6), 638-644. DOI: 10.1038/nmat3943  

Pajerowski, J., Dahl, K., Zhong, F., Sammak, P., & Discher, D. (2007) Physical plasticity of the nucleus in stem cell differentiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(40), 15619-15624. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0702576104  

Nagano, T., Lubling, Y., Stevens, T., Schoenfelder, S., Yaffe, E., Dean, W., Laue, E., Tanay, A., & Fraser, P. (2013) Single-cell Hi-C reveals cell-to-cell variability in chromosome structure. Nature, 502(7469), 59-64. DOI: 10.1038/nature12593  

Ying, Q., Wray, J., Nichols, J., Batlle-Morera, L., Doble, B., Woodgett, J., Cohen, P., & Smith, A. (2008) The ground state of embryonic stem cell self-renewal. Nature, 453(7194), 519-523. DOI: 10.1038/nature06968  

Evans, K.E., & Alderson, A. (2000) Auxetic Materials: Functional Materials and Structures from Lateral Thinking!. Advanced materials, 12(9), 617-628. info:/

Chalut, K., Höpfler, M., Lautenschläger, F., Boyde, L., Chan, C., Ekpenyong, A., Martinez-Arias, A., & Guck, J. (2012) Chromatin Decondensation and Nuclear Softening Accompany Nanog Downregulation in Embryonic Stem Cells. Biophysical Journal, 103(10), 2060-2070. DOI: 10.1016/j.bpj.2012.10.015  

  • June 6, 2014
  • 12:24 PM
  • 159 views

Gastrulation: Local actions, global movements and self-organisation

by Octavian Voiculescu in the Node

Cells move in (still) mysterious ways to achieve morphogenesis. Prominently, cells of an early vertebrate embryo (blastula, a mass of undifferentiated cells) move extensively during gastrulation to generate the three basic layers of the organism: ectoderm at the surface, endoderm presaging the digestive tube, and the mesoderm in between. At the end of the process, […]... Read more »

  • May 29, 2014
  • 03:33 PM
  • 152 views

GATA6 and the power of single cells

by Nestor Saiz in the Node

Any mammal who celebrated Mother’s Day earlier this month realizes how important mothers are for us and the tight bond between them and their children. Forget clean shirts and packed lunch every day; for us developmental biologists, there is no better reflection of this bond than the extraembryonic membranes that support the growth of the […]... Read more »

Le Bin, G., Munoz-Descalzo, S., Kurowski, A., Leitch, H., Lou, X., Mansfield, W., Etienne-Dumeau, C., Grabole, N., Mulas, C., Niwa, H.... (2014) Oct4 is required for lineage priming in the developing inner cell mass of the mouse blastocyst. Development, 141(5), 1001-1010. DOI: 10.1242/dev.096875  

Ohnishi, Y., Huber, W., Tsumura, A., Kang, M., Xenopoulos, P., Kurimoto, K., Oleś, A., Araúzo-Bravo, M., Saitou, M., Hadjantonakis, A.... (2013) Cell-to-cell expression variability followed by signal reinforcement progressively segregates early mouse lineages. Nature Cell Biology, 16(1), 27-37. DOI: 10.1038/ncb2881  

  • May 27, 2014
  • 04:07 PM
  • 121 views

It’s decision time!

by Christele Gonneau in the Node

Decisions, decisions…aren’t those one of our main worries? It is certainly the everyday worry of a stem cell! Understanding stem cell decisions is a central question in the field: how do stem cells manage to keep the right balance between self-renewal (make identical copies of themselves) and differentiation (produce specialized cells)? How do stem cells […]... Read more »

Liao, H., Chen, W., Chen, Y., Kao, T., Tseng, Y., Lee, C., Chiu, Y., Lee, P., Lin, Q., Ching, Y.... (2014) DNMT3L promotes quiescence in postnatal spermatogonial progenitor cells. Development. DOI: 10.1242/dev.105130  

  • May 18, 2014
  • 12:29 PM
  • 182 views

Use it or Lose it: Insights on neuronal connections in the vertebrate retina

by Reed College Dev Neuro in the Node

This is the final post from our developmental neurobiology seminar this semester. Two students wrote about our discussion of the importance of neuronal activity during synaptogenesis and their professor combined and edited the pieces. As usual, we focused  on development in the vertebrate retina. Hope you’ve enjoyed our contributions, we’ve enjoyed sharing our new-found understanding. […]... Read more »

  • May 9, 2014
  • 01:17 PM
  • 183 views

Grasping tendon development with the zebrafish

by Jenna Galloway in the Node

by Jessica Chen and Jenna Galloway   Animals can contort their bodies into a diversity of movements: running, jumping, climbing, and swimming to name a few. All of these movements are possible because tendons transmit the force produced by the muscles to the bones. Most of us do not pay much attention to our tendons […]... Read more »

Bassett, D., Bryson-Richardson, R. J., Daggett, D. F., Gautier, P., Keenan, D. G., & Currie, P. D. (2003) Dystrophin is required for the formation of stable muscle attachments in the zebrafish embryo. Development, 130(23), 5851-5860. DOI: 10.1242/dev.00799  

Charvet, B., Guiraud, A., Malbouyres, M., Zwolanek, D., Guillon, E., Bretaud, S., Monnot, C., Schulze, J., Bader, H., Allard, B.... (2013) Knockdown of col22a1 gene in zebrafish induces a muscular dystrophy by disruption of the myotendinous junction. Development, 140(22), 4602-4613. DOI: 10.1242/dev.096024  

Charvet, B., Malbouyres, M., Pagnon-Minot, A., Ruggiero, F., & Guellec, D. (2011) Development of the zebrafish myoseptum with emphasis on the myotendinous junction. Cell and Tissue Research, 346(3), 439-449. DOI: 10.1007/s00441-011-1266-7  

Kaufman, C., White, R., & Zon, L. (2009) Chemical genetic screening in the zebrafish embryo. Nature Protocols, 4(10), 1422-1432. DOI: 10.1038/nprot.2009.144  

Schweitzer R, Chyung JH, Murtaugh LC, Brent AE, Rosen V, Olson EN, Lassar A, & Tabin CJ. (2001) Analysis of the tendon cell fate using Scleraxis, a specific marker for tendons and ligaments. Development, 128(19), 3855-66. PMID: 11585810  

Summers, A., & Koob, T. (2002) The evolution of tendon — morphology and material properties. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular , 133(4), 1159-1170. DOI: 10.1016/S1095-6433(02)00241-6  

Yan YL, Miller CT, Nissen RM, Singer A, Liu D, Kirn A, Draper B, Willoughby J, Morcos PA, Amsterdam A.... (2002) A zebrafish sox9 gene required for cartilage morphogenesis. Development, 129(21), 5065-5079. PMID: 12397114  

  • May 3, 2014
  • 12:38 PM
  • 126 views

A simple step to reverse ageing

by Christele Gonneau in the Node

How great would it be if we knew how to reverse ageing and turn old organs into young ones? Actually, this might not be as crazy as it sounds. As a matter of fact, a team of scientists managed to regenerate the thymus in old mice and observe what closely resembles the juvenile thymus! The […]... Read more »

  • April 15, 2014
  • 09:32 PM
  • 191 views

Stone Soup Eyes

by Reed College Dev Neuro in the Node

Another installment from the Developmental Neurobiology Students at Reed College. Hope you enjoy! It’s not often that you get to recount the classic tale of Stone Soup when thinking about developmental biology, but that’s exactly what we did when discussing an almost classic 2011 Nature paper from Yoshiki Sasai’s group. In the story, a grumpy […]... Read more »

Eiraku, M., Takata, N., Ishibashi, H., Kawada, M., Sakakura, E., Okuda, S., Sekiguchi, K., Adachi, T., & Sasai, Y. (2011) Self-organizing optic-cup morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture. Nature, 472(7341), 51-56. DOI: 10.1038/nature09941  

Nakano, T., Ando, S., Takata, N., Kawada, M., Muguruma, K., Sekiguchi, K., Saito, K., Yonemura, S., Eiraku, M., & Sasai, Y. (2012) Self-Formation of Optic Cups and Storable Stratified Neural Retina from Human ESCs. Cell Stem Cell, 10(6), 771-785. DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2012.05.009  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 06:04 AM
  • 275 views

Interview with Beddington Medal winner William Razzell

by the Node in the Node

Each year, the British Society for Developmental Biology (BSDB) awards the Beddington Medal to the best PhD thesis in developmental biology. This year’s award went to William Razzell, who completed his PhD in Paul Martin’s lab at the University of Bristol. At the BSDB Spring Meeting last month, Will presented his thesis studies of wound […]... Read more »

  • March 7, 2013
  • 09:22 AM
  • 322 views

Stripes and Stem Cells

by Erin Campbell in the Node

You didn’t stop developing once you were born (or hatched).  Our infant selves barely resemble ourselves as adults, thankfully, and stem cells play an important role in this continued development.  A recent paper describes the identification of a stem cell niche that generates the melanophores that are responsible for the color patterning in adult zebrafish. [...]... Read more »

  • February 15, 2013
  • 10:47 AM
  • 395 views

Stem cell decisions and the cell cycle

by Erin Campbell in the Node

A lot of things cycle in life, even down to the cellular level.  In the developing central nervous system, regulators of the cell cycle play important roles in maintaining the balance between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.  A recent paper in the journal Development describes a cell cycle regulator in stem and progenitor cells in [...]... Read more »

  • February 7, 2013
  • 11:36 AM
  • 277 views

Review: Electric shock

by Eva Amsen in the Node

Last year, Matter launched, after a successful  Kickstarter campaign, as a magazine that publishes only long, well-written articles related to “science, technology and the ideas shaping our future”. Each issue is one article, which costs $0.99 to access. (On my iPad, they ‘re categorized as books, and are each about 40 pages long, which I [...]... Read more »

  • January 14, 2013
  • 05:02 PM
  • 273 views

Hope for Huntington’s

by Erin Campbell in the Node

Every time a biologist drives pluripotent cells to differentiate into a specialized cell type, patients of all sorts of diseases, disorders, and injuries allow their hope to grow.  A research group recently reported how to drive differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into medium-sized spiny neurons, the neurons that are some of the first to [...]... Read more »

  • December 12, 2012
  • 04:17 PM
  • 419 views

Don’t get rid of the middleman

by Erin Campbell in the Node

There are a lot of situations in life where the “middleman” is unnecessary and costly.  In cells, that middleman is necessary and fascinating at the same time.  The sequence of DNA to middleman mRNA to protein provides our cells with countless ways to regulate complex events, including those surrounding stem cell divisions. When stem cells [...]... Read more »

  • October 26, 2012
  • 04:50 PM
  • 336 views

The embryonic cell lineage of C. elegans, revisited and revisualized

by Andrew Chisholm in the Node

On my desk sits a tattered photocopy of one of the pinnacles of modern developmental biology, the “embryonic lineage” paper by John Sulston, et al. (1983). In this paper, Sulston et al. completed a project begun in the late 19th century, namely to trace the complete genealogy of all cells in a nematode embryo. C. [...]... Read more »

Giurumescu C. A., Kang S., Planchon T. A., Betzig E., Bloomekatz J., Yelon D., Cosman P., & Chisholm A. D. (2012) Quantitative semi-automated analysis of morphogenesis with single-cell resolution in complex embryos. Development, 139(22), 4279. DOI: 10.1242/dev.086256  

  • October 10, 2012
  • 03:49 PM
  • 315 views

Worms teach about germline stem cells

by Erin Campbell in the Node

To me, the stem cells within a germline are a perfect storm of fascination.  Stem cells are, of course, intriguing in their ability to self-renew and differentiate, and a germline is intriguing in its ability to generate gametes.  Add stem cells and germlines together, and you have amazing biology in front of you…and more biology [...]... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.