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the Node is a community blog for and by developmental biologists.

Eva Amsen
15 posts

Linda
4 posts

Erin Campbell
26 posts

Ret Mutant
1 post

the Node
3 posts

Paul O'Neill
1 post

Victoria Hatch
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  • April 15, 2014
  • 09:32 PM
  • 52 views

Stone Soup Eyes

by Reed College Dev Neuro in the Node

Another installment from the Developmental Neurobiology Students at Reed College. Hope you enjoy! It’s not often that you get to recount the classic tale of Stone Soup when thinking about developmental biology, but that’s exactly what we did when discussing an almost classic 2011 Nature paper from Yoshiki Sasai’s group. In the story, a grumpy […]... Read more »

Eiraku, M., Takata, N., Ishibashi, H., Kawada, M., Sakakura, E., Okuda, S., Sekiguchi, K., Adachi, T., & Sasai, Y. (2011) Self-organizing optic-cup morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture. Nature, 472(7341), 51-56. DOI: 10.1038/nature09941  

Nakano, T., Ando, S., Takata, N., Kawada, M., Muguruma, K., Sekiguchi, K., Saito, K., Yonemura, S., Eiraku, M., & Sasai, Y. (2012) Self-Formation of Optic Cups and Storable Stratified Neural Retina from Human ESCs. Cell Stem Cell, 10(6), 771-785. DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2012.05.009  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 06:04 AM
  • 75 views

Interview with Beddington Medal winner William Razzell

by the Node in the Node

Each year, the British Society for Developmental Biology (BSDB) awards the Beddington Medal to the best PhD thesis in developmental biology. This year’s award went to William Razzell, who completed his PhD in Paul Martin’s lab at the University of Bristol. At the BSDB Spring Meeting last month, Will presented his thesis studies of wound […]... Read more »

  • March 7, 2013
  • 09:22 AM
  • 267 views

Stripes and Stem Cells

by Erin Campbell in the Node

You didn’t stop developing once you were born (or hatched).  Our infant selves barely resemble ourselves as adults, thankfully, and stem cells play an important role in this continued development.  A recent paper describes the identification of a stem cell niche that generates the melanophores that are responsible for the color patterning in adult zebrafish. [...]... Read more »

  • February 15, 2013
  • 10:47 AM
  • 326 views

Stem cell decisions and the cell cycle

by Erin Campbell in the Node

A lot of things cycle in life, even down to the cellular level.  In the developing central nervous system, regulators of the cell cycle play important roles in maintaining the balance between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.  A recent paper in the journal Development describes a cell cycle regulator in stem and progenitor cells in [...]... Read more »

  • February 7, 2013
  • 11:36 AM
  • 195 views

Review: Electric shock

by Eva Amsen in the Node

Last year, Matter launched, after a successful  Kickstarter campaign, as a magazine that publishes only long, well-written articles related to “science, technology and the ideas shaping our future”. Each issue is one article, which costs $0.99 to access. (On my iPad, they ‘re categorized as books, and are each about 40 pages long, which I [...]... Read more »

  • January 14, 2013
  • 05:02 PM
  • 225 views

Hope for Huntington’s

by Erin Campbell in the Node

Every time a biologist drives pluripotent cells to differentiate into a specialized cell type, patients of all sorts of diseases, disorders, and injuries allow their hope to grow.  A research group recently reported how to drive differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into medium-sized spiny neurons, the neurons that are some of the first to [...]... Read more »

  • December 12, 2012
  • 04:17 PM
  • 326 views

Don’t get rid of the middleman

by Erin Campbell in the Node

There are a lot of situations in life where the “middleman” is unnecessary and costly.  In cells, that middleman is necessary and fascinating at the same time.  The sequence of DNA to middleman mRNA to protein provides our cells with countless ways to regulate complex events, including those surrounding stem cell divisions. When stem cells [...]... Read more »

  • October 26, 2012
  • 04:50 PM
  • 282 views

The embryonic cell lineage of C. elegans, revisited and revisualized

by Andrew Chisholm in the Node

On my desk sits a tattered photocopy of one of the pinnacles of modern developmental biology, the “embryonic lineage” paper by John Sulston, et al. (1983). In this paper, Sulston et al. completed a project begun in the late 19th century, namely to trace the complete genealogy of all cells in a nematode embryo. C. [...]... Read more »

Giurumescu C. A., Kang S., Planchon T. A., Betzig E., Bloomekatz J., Yelon D., Cosman P., & Chisholm A. D. (2012) Quantitative semi-automated analysis of morphogenesis with single-cell resolution in complex embryos. Development, 139(22), 4279. DOI: 10.1242/dev.086256  

  • October 10, 2012
  • 03:49 PM
  • 265 views

Worms teach about germline stem cells

by Erin Campbell in the Node

To me, the stem cells within a germline are a perfect storm of fascination.  Stem cells are, of course, intriguing in their ability to self-renew and differentiate, and a germline is intriguing in its ability to generate gametes.  Add stem cells and germlines together, and you have amazing biology in front of you…and more biology [...]... Read more »

  • August 21, 2012
  • 05:52 AM
  • 406 views

Virtual nanoscopy

by Eva Amsen in the Node

Let’s take a very close look at the inside of a fish! A recent paper in the Journal of Cell Biology describes a technique for generating large, composite, images from electron microscopy data. Frank Faas, Raimond Ravelli, and colleagues at the Leiden University Medical Center developed a method to computationally collect and align EM images. [...]... Read more »

Faas FG, Avramut MC, M van den Berg B, Mommaas AM, Koster AJ, & Ravelli RB. (2012) Virtual nanoscopy: Generation of ultra-large high resolution electron microscopy maps. The Journal of cell biology, 198(3), 457-69. PMID: 22869601  

  • August 13, 2012
  • 09:43 PM
  • 327 views

A stem cell needs REST

by Erin Campbell in the Node

Decisions, decisions.  Stem cells face the task to self-renew or differentiate, a decision made out of the combination and coordination of numerous regulators.  With the activation or suppression of transcriptional activators and the activation or suppression of repressors, it’s easy to see how understanding this process is anything BUT easy.  Today’s images are from a [...]... Read more »

  • August 13, 2012
  • 03:24 PM
  • 593 views

Colouring the Mouse Embryo

by wongmi22 in the Node

48 anatomical structures of the presented mouse embryo atlas are shown in 3D. Here is the backdrop for our recent paper in Development, “A novel 3D mouse embryo atlas based on micro-CT”.   With the human genome project complete, the sequence and the location of each gene in the genome is understood.  However, the understanding of [...]... Read more »

Wong MD, Dorr AE, Walls JR, Lerch JP, & Henkelman RM. (2012) A novel 3D mouse embryo atlas based on micro-CT. Development (Cambridge, England), 139(17), 3248-56. PMID: 22872090  

  • August 1, 2012
  • 12:07 PM
  • 587 views

What’s in the culture medium in IVF labs?

by Eva Amsen in the Node

British researchers working with human embryos for IVF have been wondering about the effects of components of the culture medium they use. In the UK, culture media used for IVF and fertility research are regulated by the Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and at European level. Regulation ensures that all researchers and clinicians in [...]... Read more »

Harper J, Magli MC, Lundin K, Barratt CL, & Brison D. (2012) When and how should new technology be introduced into the IVF laboratory?. Human reproduction (Oxford, England), 27(2), 303-13. PMID: 22166806  

Dumoulin JC, Land JA, Van Montfoort AP, Nelissen EC, Coonen E, Derhaag JG, Schreurs IL, Dunselman GA, Kester AD, Geraedts JP.... (2010) Effect of in vitro culture of human embryos on birthweight of newborns. Human reproduction (Oxford, England), 25(3), 605-12. PMID: 20085915  

  • July 30, 2012
  • 09:29 PM
  • 252 views

Uncovering the unexpected: New visions from the 3’ end of squint

by Shimin Lim in the Node

Here I share the background story on my graduate work that was recently published in Development, “Dorsal activity of maternal squint is mediated by a non-coding function of the RNA”: I first joined Karuna Sampath’s group at Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory in 2005 during my undergraduate days. It was an exciting year in the lab [...]... Read more »

Shimin Lim, Pooja Kumari, Patrick Gilligan, Helen Ngoc Bao Quach, Sinnakaruppan Mathavan, & Karuna Sampath. (2012) Dorsal activity of maternal squint is mediated by a non-coding function of the RNA . Development, 139(16). info:/10.1242/dev.077081

  • July 27, 2012
  • 04:05 AM
  • 352 views

Piecing together the squint puzzle

by Karuna in the Node

Here is the backdrop for our recent paper in Development, “Dorsal activity of maternal squint is mediated by a non-coding function of the RNA”:  This work follows up a previous publication from my laboratory where we showed that knock-down of maternal squint (sqt) or ablation of sqt-containing cells led to loss of dorsal structures in [...]... Read more »

Shimin Lim, Pooja Kumari, Patrick Gilligan, Helen Ngoc Bao Quach, Sinnakaruppan Mathavan, & Karuna Sampath. (2012) Dorsal activity of maternal squint is mediated by a non-coding function of the RNA . Development, 139(16). info:/10.1242/dev.077081

  • July 10, 2012
  • 05:07 PM
  • 470 views

Moderation is key

by Erin Campbell in the Node

Mae West was no biologist when she told us all that “Too much of a good thing can be wonderful.”  I shudder to think how little development would take place if any one cell type was produced in large amounts.  Thankfully, stem cells and those involved in tissue regeneration understand the importance of moderation. Today’s [...]... Read more »

  • June 13, 2012
  • 03:00 PM
  • 474 views

Affordable Fluorescence

by Paul O'Neill in the Node

Report on technological breakthrough from the Wakayama lab. Could lower costs and increase access to fluorescent microscopy. ... Read more »

Yamagata K, Iwamoto D, Terashita Y, Li C, Wakayama S, Hayashi-Takanaka Y, Kimura H, Saeki K, & Wakayama T. (2012) Fluorescence cell imaging and manipulation using conventional halogen lamp microscopy. PloS one, 7(2). PMID: 22347500  

  • May 10, 2012
  • 04:02 PM
  • 667 views

Smart signaling in the developing brain

by Erin Campbell in the Node

The WNT pathway functions in so many processes during development that it is easy to be jealous of its multi-tasking abilities.  A recent paper in Development describes the role of WNT signaling in neural stem cell proliferation. WNT signaling plays an important role in neural development, axon guidance, cell polarity, and stem cell biology.  WNT [...]... Read more »

Pei, Y., Brun, S., Markant, S., Lento, W., Gibson, P., Taketo, M., Giovannini, M., Gilbertson, R., & Wechsler-Reya, R. (2012) WNT signaling increases proliferation and impairs differentiation of stem cells in the developing cerebellum. Development, 139(10), 1724-1733. DOI: 10.1242/dev.050104  

  • April 27, 2012
  • 04:09 AM
  • 496 views

Interview with Beddington Medal winner Boyan Bonev

by Eva Amsen in the Node

Each year, the British Society for Developmental Biology awards the Beddington Medal for the best PhD thesis in developmental biology. At the 2012 BSDB meeting, this award went to Boyan Bonev, who completed his PhD in Nancy Papalopulu’s lab at the University of Manchester. At the conference, Boyan gave a talk about his PhD work, [...]... Read more »

  • April 12, 2012
  • 02:23 PM
  • 655 views

Stem cells at home

by Erin Campbell in the Node

We depend on our own comfort zones to keep us grounded, and stem cells are no different.  A recent paper in Development describes how the adhesion that keeps a stem cell in its niche is regulated. A stem cell’s niche is important in maintaining its long-term undifferentiated state.  A great model of stem cell niche [...]... Read more »

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