Language on the Move

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154 posts · 186,023 views

Language on the Move is dedicated to language and communication in multicultural and transnational contexts: language learning, multilingualism and intercultural communication, in short, in Language and Communication on the Move (L.CoM)! The blog is part of the sociolinguistics portal www.languageonthemove.org created by Ingrid Piller and Kimie Takahashi. Visit www.languageonthemove.org to find out more about our work.

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  • September 29, 2016
  • 01:21 AM
  • 21 views

Urban sociolinguistics in Dubai

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

A couple of years ago, I mused here on Language on the Move what linguistic theory would look like if...... Read more »

Piller, I. (2016) Dubai: Language in the ethnocratic, corporate and mobile city. Smakman, D. and P. Heinrich. Eds. Metrolinguistics: Urban Language Ecologies around the World. info:/

  • September 21, 2016
  • 12:46 AM
  • 134 views

Can ESL teachers play a role in helping maintain the home language?

by Agnes Bodis in Language on the Move








ESL teachers play an important role in home language maintenance (Image Credit: Macquarie University)
Learning the host country’s language is important for migrants but we should not forget that maintaining the home language is just as essential for the next generation’s success in life. Unfortunately, in Australia there are no policies in place that support the home language maintenance of languages other than English. In the absence of top-down approaches, changing........ Read more »

  • September 14, 2016
  • 11:24 PM
  • 166 views

Language and migration

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Humans are a migratory species. Although in modern society the dominant imagery we have created about ourselves is that it...... Read more »

Piller, I. (2016) Language and migration. Language and migration, 1-20. info:/

  • September 6, 2016
  • 12:34 AM
  • 210 views

Why a multilingual social imagination matters

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Last week I was fortunate to be able to attend the 2016 annual conference of the British Association of Applied...... Read more »

  • July 17, 2016
  • 04:57 AM
  • 363 views

Would you mind if your child wanted to become an interpreter?

by Jinhyun Cho in Language on the Move

I recently volunteered to give a presentation on the profession of translation and interpreting as a parent helper for a...... Read more »

  • June 5, 2016
  • 01:05 AM
  • 423 views

Why does English spread in global academia?

by Jinhyun Cho in Language on the Move

The Linguistic Ethnography Forum’s e-seminar devoted to Ingrid Piller’s recent book Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice: An Introduction to Applied...... Read more »

Piller, I., & Cho, J. (2013) Neoliberalism as language policy. Language in Society, 42(01), 23-44. DOI: 10.1017/S0047404512000887  

  • May 11, 2016
  • 01:10 AM
  • 482 views

Do monolingual teachers produce a Golem effect in multilingual students?

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Teacher expectations produce self-fulfilling prophecies in student performance: high teacher expectations result in students’ higher academic performance and low teacher...... Read more »

  • April 28, 2016
  • 06:19 AM
  • 567 views

Portrait of a linguistic shirker

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move








I recently pointed out that the widespread belief that migrants refuse to learn the language of their new country does not stack up against the realities of adult language learning. I summarized the research that shows that adult language learning is complex and difficult and rarely an all-out success; to blame migrants for their failure to learn a new language (well) is adding insult to injury.
The German-language club (“Stammtisch”) in New York founded by G........ Read more »

  • April 12, 2016
  • 06:11 PM
  • 545 views

Cleaning work: a stepping-stone or a dead-end job for migrants?

by Maiju Strommer in Language on the Move

Let me at once introduce you to the main character of this blog post: Kifibin. He is a Ugandan man...... Read more »

  • April 6, 2016
  • 06:23 AM
  • 660 views

The language that cannot speak its name

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Our understanding of the role of language in social life suffers from a particularly intractable problem: the terms we use...... Read more »

  • March 30, 2016
  • 03:19 AM
  • 548 views

The real problem with linguistic shirkers

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Germany has discovered a new social type that is causing grieve in modern diverse societies: the “Integrationsverweigerer;” literally someone who...... Read more »

  • March 14, 2016
  • 06:10 PM
  • 606 views

Crucial communication: language management in Australian asylum interviews

by Laura Smith-Khan in Language on the Move

Asylum seekers in Australia face a few very public hurdles. Successive governments have used increasingly restrictive refugee policies to gain...... Read more »

  • March 8, 2016
  • 09:22 PM
  • 632 views

Temples helping heritage language maintenance in Australia

by Niru Perera in Language on the Move

Do you know which non-Christian religion has grown the fastest in Australia since the new millennium? You might be surprised...... Read more »

Perera, N. (2016) Tamil in the temples – Language and religious maintenance beyond the first generation. Multilingua. info:/10.1515/multi-2015-0059

  • March 3, 2016
  • 09:01 PM
  • 805 views

Herder: an explainer for linguists

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Some contemporary sociolinguists love to hate an 18th century educator, philosopher, theologian, translator and general polymath by the name of...... Read more »

  • February 9, 2016
  • 05:40 PM
  • 669 views

Alles in Ordnung? Reflections on German order

by Rahel Cramer in Language on the Move

Everyone who has learned a second language will have noticed that certain words and expressions cannot be translated easily from...... Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 06:18 PM
  • 558 views

Ways of seeing

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Here in Australia we celebrated our national holiday yesterday. Australia Day marks the end of the summer holiday season and as everyone heads back to school and work, Language on the Move is coming back from our break, too. Welcome … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 8, 2015
  • 04:43 PM
  • 887 views

Discrimination by any other name: Language tests and racist migration policy in Australia

by Laura Smith-Khan in Language on the Move

Australia has a proud national narrative of migration and multiculturalism. It also has an equally prevalent history of exclusionary and discriminatory migration policy. Perhaps the most famous is its “White Australia Policy”, which sought to restrict the migration of “non-European” … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 24, 2015
  • 04:36 PM
  • 775 views

Cultural brokering

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Recently, I signed a contract for a revised second edition of my 2011 book Intercultural Communication: A Critical Introduction to be published in 2017. One way in which I am planning to extend the book is to have a greater … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 27, 2015
  • 06:09 PM
  • 951 views

“Made in Germany” at risk? Volkswagen and the German trademark

by Rahel Cramer in Language on the Move

The Volkswagen (VW) emissions scandal has received significant media coverage in and outside of Germany. Besides accounts of the developments that led to the discovery of Volkswagen’s unethical behaviour, the immediate impacts on the company’s finances, CEO Martin Winterkorn’s resignation … Continue reading →... Read more »

Piller, I. (2003) Advertising as a site of language contact. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 170-183. DOI: 10.1017/S0267190503000254  

  • October 7, 2015
  • 12:28 AM
  • 784 views

Children as language brokers

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Some of the most striking images from the refugees who have been trekking across Europe are of families and children. Beyond the immediate perils of their journeys, migration inevitably changes families. As children are usually much quicker to learn new … Continue reading →... Read more »

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