Language on the Move

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132 posts · 128,372 views

Language on the Move is dedicated to language and communication in multicultural and transnational contexts: language learning, multilingualism and intercultural communication, in short, in Language and Communication on the Move (L.CoM)! The blog is part of the sociolinguistics portal www.languageonthemove.org created by Ingrid Piller and Kimie Takahashi. Visit www.languageonthemove.org to find out more about our work.

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  • August 25, 2015
  • 06:58 PM
  • 71 views

Don’t know what “jurisdictional error” means? Some people’s future depends on it

by Laura Smith-Khan in Language on the Move

When people arrive in countries like Australia, seeking to be recognised as refugees and offered protection, it is obviously important that they are able to communicate their experiences and respond to any doubts the authorities may have about their claims. … Continue reading →... Read more »

Crock, M. . (2011) Immigration, Refugees and Forced Migration: Law, policy and practice in Australia. Annandale: The Federation Press. info:/

  • August 11, 2015
  • 08:50 PM
  • 136 views

Getting past the ‘indigenous’ vs. ‘immigrant’ language debate

by Dave Sayers in Language on the Move

“Indigenous languages” and “immigrant languages” are much discussed in language policy research, but surprisingly little time is spent actually defining those terms. In general, “indigenous” tends to encompass two features: a long heritage in a place; and some form of … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 15, 2015
  • 03:39 AM
  • 179 views

Frightful language tests

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

In the Middle Ages those suspected of witchcraft were often subjected to a ‘trial by fire’ to prove their innocence or guilt. The idea was that fire was a divine manifestation and hence the ordeal of being burnt would result … Continue reading →... Read more »

Young, M. M. (1989) Comment: The Salem Witch Trials 300 Years Later: How Far Has the American Legal System Come? How Much Further Does It Need to Go?. Tulane Law Review, 234-258. info:/

  • July 8, 2015
  • 12:07 AM
  • 193 views

Language or religion: which is the greater fault line in diverse societies?

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

In a shopping mall in the city of Brighton, UK, a tourist was arrested on terrorism charges last week for taking a selfie video. Surely, taking selfies in a shopping mall is such a part of contemporary culture that the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • June 30, 2015
  • 08:12 PM
  • 153 views

Mongolian on the market

by Gegentuul Baioud in Language on the Move

Last week when I saw in my friends’ Wechat group an advertisement for delicately made Mongolian yurts, I thought of an article I had read earlier written by Mongolian scholar Naran Bilik. In his paper about urbanized Mongolians Bilik writes: … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 26, 2015
  • 08:15 PM
  • 205 views

Voice of China on the move

by Alexandra Grey in Language on the Move

It’s a weeknight at the Sydney Town Hall, an ornate 19th century building in the city centre. Almost everyone bustling in the entryway is of Chinese extraction, except the ushers (and me). They’re all ages, and as I pour inside … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 19, 2015
  • 10:14 PM
  • 229 views

Are the children of intermarried couples smarter?

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Ever since my research for my 2002 book Bilingual Couples Talk I’ve regularly been told by people – or been asked to confirm their belief – that a cross-cultural relationship is beneficial once the couple have children. The children are … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 13, 2015
  • 12:01 AM
  • 233 views

“Naughty boys” trying to learn

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Teacher expectations can constitute a self-fulfilling prophecy: teachers behave differently towards children depending on their expectations of them. The ways in which teachers treat students affect students’ self-concept, motivation, achievement and aspirations. Over time, the performance of high-expectation students will … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 14, 2015
  • 09:06 PM
  • 285 views

‘Investing in language:’ Why do we think about language education the way we do?

by Agnes Bodis in Language on the Move

If someone cannot now learn their native language, adding a couple of foerign (sic) dead languages is not going to help them. And there is no possible economic return such as is available from Asian languages or living European languages … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 7, 2015
  • 11:52 PM
  • 281 views

Children of the harvest: schooling, class and race

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

I’ve just come across a fascinating article about the schooling of migrant children during the Great Depression era in the US West Coast states. The authors, Paul Theobald and Rubén Donato, tell a fascinating tale of the manipulation of schooling … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • March 17, 2015
  • 06:35 PM
  • 321 views

Paying lip-service to diversity

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Bilingual education presents a major conundrum in contemporary diverse societies: on the one hand, bilingualism and diversity more generally are applauded in many educational discourses and widely seen as a good thing; on the other hand, schooling is all about … Continue reading →... Read more »

Robertson, L., Drury, R., & Cable, C. (2014) Silencing bilingualism: a day in a life of a bilingual practitioner. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 17(5), 610-623. DOI: 10.1080/13670050.2013.864252  

  • March 3, 2015
  • 05:48 PM
  • 302 views

Is language learning on the job the best way to learn a new language?

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

One of the most famous research subjects to ever have participated in second language learning research is a man known in the literature as Alberto. In 1973 Alberto participated in a ten-month longitudinal study of his learning of various English … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 3, 2015
  • 10:03 PM
  • 358 views

What’s in a name?

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Would Kirk Douglas be a Hollywood legend if he had kept his birth name Issur Danielovitch? Would Bob Dylan have achieved global fame if he had kept his birth name Robert Zimmerman? Would the current Australian treasurer Joe Hockey have … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 4, 2014
  • 05:52 PM
  • 520 views

Lost in bilingual parenting

by Shiva Motaghi Tabari in Language on the Move

It is not unusual for bilingual parents to experience a sense of bewilderment when it comes to language choice in the family. When raising a child in a language different from the one parents were socialised into, old truths and … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 16, 2014
  • 02:43 AM
  • 470 views

Bilingual students at the crossroads

by Livia Gerber in Language on the Move

Secondary education as a monolingual fork in the road Let me bust a prevalent urban myth: You do not need to be bi- or multilingual to become a linguist. There, busted. In fact, being bilingual initially brought me to a … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 27, 2014
  • 05:18 AM
  • 417 views

Crossing borders or carrying borders?

by Li Jia in Language on the Move

Over the past few decades, an increasing number of Burmese international students have enrolled in high schools in Yunnan, a province in the Southwest of China bordering Myanmar. More and more Burmese students are crossing the border in order to … Continue reading →... Read more »

Tara J Yosso; William A Smith; Miguel Ceja; Daniel G Solórzano. (2009) Critical Race Theory, Racial Microaggressions, and Campus Racial Climate for Latina/o Undergraduates. Harvard Educational Review, 79(4). info:/

  • October 9, 2014
  • 11:07 PM
  • 500 views

Gaining a Green Thumb for Grassroots Language Activism

by Alexandra Grey in Language on the Move

I was surprised, frankly, during my recent fieldwork to find Zhuang language being used in a QQ chatroom in China. Surprised because Zhuang text is absent from the linguistic landscape. Surprised because many of my interview participants reported they had … Continue reading →... Read more »

Cru, Josep. (2014) Language Revitalisation from the Ground Up: Promoting Yucatec Maya on Facebook. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 1-13. info:/10.1080/01434632.2014.921184

  • September 22, 2014
  • 05:11 AM
  • 522 views

Language work in the internet café

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

There is now a well-established body of work exploring the language work provided by service workers in call centres and tourist businesses. By contrast, the multilingual language work provided by migrants for migrants in multiethnic service enterprises has rarely been … Continue reading →... Read more »

Maria Sabaté i Dalmau. (2014) Migrant Communication Enterprises: Regimentation and Resistance. Multilingual Matters. info:/

  • August 5, 2014
  • 07:24 PM
  • 638 views

Sink-or-swim for international students

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It is one of the basic findings of decades of research in bilingual education that language submersion is not a productive way to educate minority students. ‘Language submersion’ refers to a situation where students are made to study exclusively through … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 08:23 PM
  • 578 views

How the presence of a bilingual school changes the linguistic profile of a community

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It is one of the great narratives of our time that the market will fix everything. In education this means that parental choice is assumed to improve education. Rather than the state supplying high-quality education, the neoliberal credo is that … Continue reading →... Read more »

Clyne, Michael. (2005) Australia's Language Potential . Sydney, UNSW Press. . info:/

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