Post List

  • July 23, 2014
  • 12:14 PM
  • 5 views

Vaccine halves dengue cases

by Yao-Hua Law in TORCH

[Another version of this article was first published on SciDev.Net. Click here for link.]   A vaccine that can half the number of dengue cases will soon be available. A recent trial conducted in Southeast Asia shows that this dengue vaccine achieves a vaccine efficacy of 56.5%: the vaccine reduces an individual’s chance of getting […]... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 11:54 AM
  • 130 views

The Adolescent Dog: One Last Chance?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

A synthesis of the latest research on social influences on development suggests adolescence is an important time for mammals – including dogs.Photo: dezi / ShutterstockMost people are familiar with the idea of a sensitive period for puppies that ends around 12 or 14 weeks. Is it possible that adolescence is also an important period for brain development and future behaviour?Social experience plays an important role in shaping animal behaviour throughout development according to Sachser et al (........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 10:22 AM
  • 86 views

What the textbooks don't tell you - one of psychology's most famous experiments was seriously flawed

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

Zimbardo speaking in '09Conducted in 1971, the Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) has acquired a mythical status and provided the inspiration for at least two feature-length films. You'll recall that several university students allocated to the role of jailor turned brutal and the study had to be aborted prematurely. Philip Zimbardo, the experiment's lead investigator, says the lesson from the research is that in certain situations, good people readily turn bad. "If you put good apples into a bad ........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 09:38 AM
  • 49 views

Video Tip of the Week: Nowomics, set up alert feeds for new data

by Mary in OpenHelix

Yeah, I know you know. There’s a lot of genomics and proteomics data coming out every day–some of it in the traditional publication route, but some of it isn’t–and it’s only getting harder and harder to wrangle the useful information to access the signal from the noise.  I can remember when merely looking through the […]... Read more »

Acland A., T. Barrett, J. Beck, D. A. Benson, C. Bollin, E. Bolton, S. H. Bryant, K. Canese, D. M. Church, & K. Clark. (2014) Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Research, 42(D1). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkt1146  

  • July 23, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 55 views

Let's Get Loud

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Loud noises are common in nature. New research is giving clues as to how and why animals make such noise. A new study investigates the reasons that howler monkeys howl. Protection and marking territory are main reasons, including for protection of infants or feeding areas.

A slightly older study notes that blue whale song has become lower in pitch since the whaling ban. The authors suggest that the reason for this may be that males don’t have to sing as loud (higher frequencies are loud........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 36 views

Male body shame and aggression against women (“rape proclivity”)

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

The American Bar Association is seeking nominations until August 8, 2014 to help it decide on the Top 100 law blogs (“Blawgs”). We have been in the ABA Top 100 for the past 4 years and would like to make it 5! If you like this blog, please nominate us (it’s fast and free) here. […]

Related posts:
Women and true crime tales of rape, murder & serial killers
Racist roads not taken and prejudice-based aggression
Women who stalk: Who they are and how they do it


... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 07:01 AM
  • 65 views

Seeing Red: A New Way To Predict Preeclampsia

by Rebekah Morrow in United Academics

New Congo red test predicts development of preeclampsia with pregnant women. A large collaboration of scientists recently reported a new method of determining which women would develop preeclampsia. Urine samples were collected from more than 600 patients and mixed with a dye called Congo red. Congo red stains large clumps of proteins, but doesn’t mark smaller separate proteins.... Read more »

Buhimschi IA, Nayeri UA, Zhao G, Shook LL, Pensalfini A, Funai EF, Bernstein IM, Glabe CG, & Buhimschi CS. (2014) Protein misfolding, congophilia, oligomerization, and defective amyloid processing in preeclampsia. Science translational medicine, 6(245). PMID: 25031267  

Whitehead, N. (2014) Proteins and a pregnancy woe. Science, 345(6194), 249-249. DOI: 10.1126/science.345.6194.249  

  • July 23, 2014
  • 06:57 AM
  • 95 views

Top-of-atmosphere contribution to unforced variability in global temperature

by Ed Hawkins in Climate Lab Book

As the attention received by the ‘global warming hiatus’ demonstrates, global mean surface temperature (T) variability on decadal timescales is of great interest to both the general public and to scientists. Here, I will discuss a recently published paper (Brown … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 05:00 AM
  • 78 views

Might you like a water mite named after you?

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

In light of the new water mite named after pop star Jennifer Lopez, we take a funny look at other critters named after celebrities.... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 03:46 AM
  • 85 views

Trauma and PTSD raise risk of autoimmune disorders?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I admit to some head scratching when I first read the paper by Aoife O’Donovan and colleagues [1] reporting that among war veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan campaigns, "trauma exposure and PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder] may increase risk of autoimmune disorders".It wasn't that I didn't believe the results, but rather that the idea that a physical event with a psychological consequence could impact on a somatic condition with an autoimmune element to it seemed to open u........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 59 views

Despite the Hype: Many Former NFL Athletes May Have Normal Neurological Function and Structure

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Neuropsychological impairments were found in some retired NFL players; however, the majority of retired NFL players had no clinical signs of chronic brain damage. Some retired players had lesions found on brain imaging tests and these were associated with the number of previous concussions.... Read more »

  • July 22, 2014
  • 11:20 PM
  • 64 views

Heroes and Villains: Banal or Special People? Part 2 of 2

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

According to Zimbardo and colleagues, both heroic acts and evil acts occur primarily in response to situational factors, rather than internal features of the person. However, on closer inspection, the situationist analysis provides inconsistent accounts of how each of these occurs. Evil actions are attributed to factors entirely outside the person, while heroism relies on the person’s inner qualities.... Read more »

  • July 22, 2014
  • 07:04 PM
  • 30 views

Over the counter drug addiction

by DJMac in Recovery Review

In many countries around the world, codeine is available only on prescription. It’s a weak opioid, but can still cause addiction. Low dose codeine is also available in the UK, over-the-counter (OTC) in pharmacies. It’s sold in combination with paracetamol (co-codamol, e.g. Solpadol), in combination with ibuprofen (e.g. Nurofen Plus), and in combination with dihydrocodeine (co-dydramol, e.g. [...]
The post Over the counter drug addiction appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • July 22, 2014
  • 06:47 PM
  • 76 views

When Crazy becomes a Crime

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

My friend has a glass eye, you would never notice and unless you knew the story you might not think anything of it. His older brother did it. Yes, you […]... Read more »

Dana Goldman,, John Fastenau,, Riad Dirani,, Eric Hellend,, Geoff Joyce,, Ryan Conrad,, & Darius Lakdawalla,. (2014) Medicaid Prior Authorization Policies and Imprisonment Among Patients With Schizophrenia. The American Journal of Managed Care, 20(7). info:/2014;20(7):577-586

  • July 22, 2014
  • 03:38 PM
  • 53 views

Cheaper Platinum-Yttrium Fuel Cell Catalyst Developed

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) report that they have developed a platinum-yttrium fuel cell catalyst which is stable, more active and less expensive than the existing platinum catalysts.... Read more »

Patricia Hernandez-Fernandez, Federico Masini, David N. McCarthy, Christian E. Strebel, Daniel Friebel, Davide Deiana, Paolo Malacrida, Anders Nierhoff, Anders Bodin, Anna M. Wise, Jane H. Nielsen, Thomas W. Hansen, Anders Nilsson, Ifan E. L. . (2014) Mass-selected nanoparticles of PtxY as model catalysts for ​oxygen electroreduction. Nature Chemistry. info:/10.1038/nchem.2001

  • July 22, 2014
  • 02:00 PM
  • 69 views

The Genetic Craftwork of CRISPR

by The Lab Hippo in The Lab Hippo

n ancient immune system used by bacteria to combat against viral phage infections is the latest tool at the disposal of genetic engineers. Many have high hopes of it allowing not only targeted genome alterations, but also the ability to colocalize any RNA, DNA or protein polymer to specified genomic DNA locations.... Read more »

  • July 22, 2014
  • 01:48 PM
  • 64 views

Fasting Improves Recovery of Bone Marrow Stem Cells after Chemotherapy

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Fasting is defined as either completely abstaining from or minimizing food intake for a defined period time - ranging from about 12 hours to even a few weeks. Calorie restriction, on the other hand, refers to an overall reduction in the daily calorie intake by about 20%-40% without necessarily reducing the meal intake frequency. Although calorie restriction is well-suited for weight loss and thus also reduces the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes or heart disease, proponents of fasting c........ Read more »

  • July 22, 2014
  • 01:19 PM
  • 63 views

Optical Cables, from Thin Air!

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

It’s a project that would make Tesla proud. Just imagine being able to instantaneously run an optical cable or fiber to any point on earth, or even into space. That’s what researchers are trying to do. Did I mention it was instantaneous and involved no connection other than the air around us? Well if you are as excited as I am, then you should read on! If not, two words, laser weapons!!... Read more »

Rosenthal, E., Jhajj, N., Wahlstrand, J., & Milchberg, H. (2014) Collection of remote optical signals by air waveguides. Optica, 1(1), 5. DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.1.000005  

Jhajj, N., Rosenthal, E., Birnbaum, R., Wahlstrand, J., & Milchberg, H. (2014) Demonstration of Long-Lived High-Power Optical Waveguides in Air. Physical Review X, 4(1). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.011027  

  • July 22, 2014
  • 09:08 AM
  • 56 views

A History of Bioinformatics (told from the Year 2039)

by Mary in OpenHelix

A week or so back I was watching the chatter around the #ISMB / #BOSC2014 meeting, and saw a number of amusing and intriguing comments about Titus Brown’s keynote talk. [embedded tweets] You can see a lot of chatter about it in the Storify. I was delighted to soon see this follow up...... Read more »

  • July 22, 2014
  • 07:15 AM
  • 67 views

White or Brown: which is the better fat?

by Shefali Sabharanjak in United Academics

White adipose tissue or white fat has earned notoriety in the current obesity pandemic. But it is not right to throw white fat cells out of the window, just yet. Recent research has shown that conservation of energy-storing white fat cells can help to overcome cachexia brought on by chemotherapy in cancer patients. ... Read more »

Petruzzelli, M., Schweiger, M., Schreiber, R., Campos-Olivas, R., Tsoli, M., Allen, J., Swarbrick, M., Rose-John, S., Rincon, M., Robertson, G.... (2014) A Switch from White to Brown Fat Increases Energy Expenditure in Cancer-Associated Cachexia. Cell Metabolism. DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2014.06.011  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.