Post List

  • April 18, 2015
  • 05:22 AM
  • 86 views

Autistic traits in adult-onset psychiatric disorders?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"To conclude, the presentation of ALTs [autistic-like traits/symptoms] at the sub-threshold or threshold level may be closely associated with BPD [bipolar disorder] and SZ [schizophrenia]."That was the conclusion reached in the paper by Junko Matsuo and colleagues [1] (open-access here) based on their analysis of nearly 300 adults aged between 25-59 years including those diagnosed with "MDD [major depressive disorder], n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia,&n........ Read more »

Matsuo J, Kamio Y, Takahashi H, Ota M, Teraishi T, Hori H, Nagashima A, Takei R, Higuchi T, Motohashi N.... (2015) Autistic-Like Traits in Adult Patients with Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia. PloS one, 10(4). PMID: 25838109  

  • April 18, 2015
  • 04:45 AM
  • 84 views

Major Advance in Artificial Photosynthesis

by Perikis Livas in Chilon

A potentially game-changing breakthrough in artificial photosynthesis has been achieved with the development of a system that can capture carbon dioxide emissions before they are vented into the atmosphere and then, powered by solar energy, convert that carbon dioxide into valuable chemical products, including biodegradable plastics, pharmaceutical drugs and even liquid fuels.... Read more »

  • April 17, 2015
  • 09:59 PM
  • 7 views

5% of Patients Account For 47% VA Health Care Costs

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Donna Zulman MD MS Center for Innovation to Implementation, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park Division of General Medical Disciplines, Stanford University, Stanford California, USA Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. … Continue reading →
The post 5% of Patients Account For 47% VA Health Care Costs appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interv........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Donna Zulman MD MS. (2015) 5% of Patients Account For 47% VA Health Care Costs. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • April 17, 2015
  • 07:47 PM
  • 110 views

Study links brain anatomy, academic achievement, and family income

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Many years of research have shown that for students from lower-income families, standardized test scores and other measures of academic success tend to lag behind those of wealthier students. Well now a new study offers another dimension to this so-called “achievement gap”After imaging the brains of high- and low-income students, they found that the higher-income students had thicker brain cortex in areas associated with visual perception and knowledge accumulation.... Read more »

Allyson Mackey et al. (2015) Students’ Family Income Linked With Brain Anatomy, Academic Achievement. Psychological Science. info:/

  • April 17, 2015
  • 05:24 PM
  • 9 views

Physical Activity Including Housework Linked To Better Physical and Emotional Aging

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Kathy Wright, PhD, RN, GCNS-BC, PMHCNS-BC KL2 Postdoc, Clinical Instructor 2011-13 SAMHSA Scholar 2010-12 National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence Patricia G. Archbold Scholar Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio … Continue reading →
The post Physical Activity Including Housework Linked To Better Physical and Emotional Agi........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Kathy Wright, PhD, RN, GCNS-BC, PMHCNS-BC. (2015) Physical Activity Including Housework Linked To Better Physical and Emotional Aging. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • April 17, 2015
  • 03:56 PM
  • 70 views

Artificial blood vessel lets researchers assess clot removal devices

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

For the first time, researchers have created an in vitro, live-cell artificial vessel that can be used to study both the application and effects of devices used to extract life-threatening blood clots in the brain. The artificial vessel could have significant implications for future development of endovascular technologies, including reducing the need for animal models to test new devices or approaches.... Read more »

  • April 17, 2015
  • 03:09 PM
  • 96 views

Peer review: bad with it, worse without it

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Peer review is seen as one of the pillars - if not the most important - of scientific communication. Despite the difficulties in going through the review process, the authors believe that the process improves the quality of the manuscript, and they want to be published on refereed journals that have a sound evaluation mechanism. Recent cases of attempted manipulation of the peer review process by fake reviews concern the international scientific community, however, it does not undermine its cred........ Read more »

Nicholas David, Hamid R. Jamali, Eti Herman, Carol Tenopir, Rachel Volentine, Suzie Allard, & Kenneth Levine. (2015) Peer review: still king in the digital age. Learned Publishing, 28(1), 15-21. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1087/20150104  

  • April 17, 2015
  • 02:48 PM
  • 9 views

CDC Discusses Best Practices and Resources For Childhood ADHD

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Susanna N. Visser, DrPH Epidemiologist at the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities CDC   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Visser: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD … Continue reading →
The post CDC Discusses Best Practices and Resources For Childhood ADHD appeared first on MedicalResearch.c........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Susanna N. Visser, DrPH. (2015) CDC Discusses Best Practices and Resources For Childhood ADHD. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • April 17, 2015
  • 12:28 PM
  • 7 views

Gas Cavity Produces That Sound When You Crack Your Joints

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gregory N. Kawchuk Ph.D. Department of Physical Therapy  Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Jerome Fryer, one of … Continue reading →
The post Gas Cavity Produces That Sound When You Crack Your Joints appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Rese........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gregory N. Kawchuk Ph.D. (2015) Gas Cavity Produces That Sound When You Crack Your Joints. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • April 17, 2015
  • 12:27 PM
  • 83 views

Electricity generation from pollution? Yes, it is possible !

by Ruth Garcia de la Calle in ADVOCATE Marie Curie Network

how bacteria batteries work and the role they play in contaminated groundwater remediation. ... Read more »

  • April 17, 2015
  • 12:25 PM
  • 73 views

On the trail of nitrogen to quantify N removal from contaminated aquifers

by Ruth Garcia de la Calle in ADVOCATE Marie Curie Network

Naomi Wells is working on developing better ways of measuring where water pollution comes from, and how long it’s going to stick around for. She uses light stable isotopes to improve the understanding of the fate and transport of key nutrients across biomes, landscapes, and scales.... Read more »

  • April 17, 2015
  • 11:15 AM
  • 67 views

The downfall of coal: job trends in a changing energy landscape

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Coal jobs have decreased dramatically in the past seven years, but are renewable energy and natural gas jobs compensating? New policy work reveals the geographical patterns in job changes that do not bode well for coal-producing states.... Read more »

  • April 17, 2015
  • 10:44 AM
  • 80 views

Sick Coyotes Are More Likely to Come into Cities

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Run-ins are on the rise between coyotes and city-dwelling humans, and scientists aren't sure why. Now researchers in Alberta think they've found a piece of the puzzle. Coyotes are more likely to creep into human spaces if they're unhealthy.

Conflict between humans and coyotes has increased during the last 20 years, write University of Alberta graduate student Maureen Murray and her coauthors. Yet coyotes were expanding their range for decades before that. They've spread to inhabit nearly ... Read more »

Murray, M., Edwards, M., Abercrombie, B., & St. Clair, C. (2015) Poor health is associated with use of anthropogenic resources in an urban carnivore. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282(1806), 20150009-20150009. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.0009  

  • April 17, 2015
  • 10:03 AM
  • 84 views

Mapping the language system: Part 2

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

This is the second of a multi-part post about a pair of papers that just came out (Mirman et al., 2015, in press). Part 1 was about the behavioral data: we started with 17 behavioral measures from 99 participants with aphasia following left hemisphere stroke. Using factor analysis, we reduced those 17 measures to 4 underlying factors: Semantic Recognition, Speech Production, Speech Recognition, and Semantic Errors. For each of these factors, we then used voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (........ Read more »

Hickok G. (2012) Computational neuroanatomy of speech production. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 13(2), 135-145. PMID: 22218206  

Hickok, Gregory S, & Poeppel, David. (2007) The cortical organization of speech processing. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 8(May), 393-402. info:/

Zhang Y., Kimberg D.Y., Coslett H.B., Schwartz M.F., & Wang Z. (2014) Multivariate lesion-symptom mapping using support vector regression. Human Brain Mapping, 35(12), 5861-5876. PMID: 25044213  

  • April 17, 2015
  • 09:12 AM
  • 6 views

Relatively Small Drop In Price Leads To More Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Kylie Ball PhD Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, Deakin University, Australia. Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Most Australians (95% of adults) do not eat … Continue reading →
The post Relatively Small Drop In Price Leads To More Fruit and Vegetable Consumption appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Med........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Kylie Ball PhD. (2015) Relatively Small Drop In Price Leads To More Fruit and Vegetable Consumption. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • April 17, 2015
  • 08:06 AM
  • 9 views

Psychology students are seduced by superfluous neuroscience

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

It seems as though neuroscience is particularly popular and seductive. Not only is the discipline enjoying some eye-spinningly massive new grants, there are also ever more brain-branded products (like brain games and brain drinks), there are new disciplines like neuroleadership, and there's a growing obsession about the brain among many journalists, many of whom invoke brain science in odd contexts (check out "The neuroscience of ISIS" for a recent example).This atmosphere has led to a near-cons........ Read more »

  • April 17, 2015
  • 06:08 AM
  • 96 views

Marathon runners forget how painful it was

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Image: Flickr/GregThe sense of accomplishment from running a marathon is hugely uplifting. But let's not romanticise it, there's also a lot of pain involved. Despite this, many people pull on their running shoes time and again. A new study helps make sense of their behaviour – it turns out most marathon runners forget just how painful it was the last time. Przemyslaw Bąbel recruited 62 runners (39 men) who took part in the 11th Cracovia Marathon in Cracow, Poland in 2012. Moments after they c........ Read more »

  • April 17, 2015
  • 04:38 AM
  • 102 views

Rhabdomyomas: an additional BHD hamartoma phenotype?

by Danielle Stevenson in BHD Research Blog

Hamartomas are benign, focal malformations formed by an excess of normal tissue growing in a disorganised fashion. Several hamartoma syndromes have been linked to aberrant mTOR signalling including BHD and Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC). In addition to the predisposition of BHD patients to develop hair follicle hamartomas or fibrofolliculomas (Birt et al., 1977), Fuyura et al., (2012) propose that the pulmonary cysts in BHD patients are hamartoma-like cystic alveolar formations. The benign nat........ Read more »

Bondavalli D, White SM, Steer A, Pflaumer A, & Winship I. (2015) Is cardiac rhabdomyoma a feature of Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome?. American journal of medical genetics. Part A, 167(4), 802-4. PMID: 25655561  

  • April 17, 2015
  • 03:52 AM
  • 79 views

Higher cancer mortality rates associated with mental illness

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The findings reported by Steve Kisely and colleagues [1] were of some interest recently and their assertion that despite cancer incidence being "the same as the general population for most psychiatric disorders" or even slightly reduced when a diagnosis of schizophrenia was for example received, mortality due to cancer was "increased in psychiatric patients."Such findings were based on their examination of: "Mental health records [that] were linked with cancer registrations and death r........ Read more »

  • April 16, 2015
  • 06:35 PM
  • 7 views

B vitamins and Omega-3 May Protect Against Brain Shrinkage

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Fredrik Jernerén PhD Postdoctoral Research Fellow Department of Pharmacology University of Oxford Oxford, United Kingdom Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Jernerén: Development of dementia and Alzheimer’s … Continue reading →
The post B vitamins and Omega-3 May Protect Against Brain Shrinkage appeared first on MedicalResearch.com ........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Fredrik Jernerén PhD. (2015) B vitamin and Omega-3 May Protect Against Brain Shrinkage. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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