Post List

  • August 27, 2014
  • 09:45 AM
  • 90 views

Is it really possible for someone to turn into THE HULK? Don’t make me angry.

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Could epigenetics provide a bit of a biological explanation behind THE HULK?... Read more »

  • August 27, 2014
  • 09:38 AM
  • 58 views

Video Tip of the Week: Phenoscape, captures phenotype data across taxa

by Mary in OpenHelix

Development of the skeleton is a good example of a process that is highly regulated, requires a lot of precision, is conserved and important relationships across species, and is fairly easy to detect when it’s gone awry. I mean–it’s hard to know at a glance if all the neurons in an organism got to the […]... Read more »

Mabee By Paula, Balhoff James P, Dahdul Wasila M, Lapp Hilmar, Midford Peter E, Vision Todd J, & Westerfield Monte. (2012) 500,000 fish phenotypes: The new informatics landscape for evolutionary and developmental biology of the vertebrate skeleton. Zeitschrift fur angewandte Ichthyologie . PMID: 22736877  

Balhoff James P., Cartik R. Kothari, Hilmar Lapp, John G. Lundberg, Paula Mabee, Peter E. Midford, Monte Westerfield, & Todd J. Vision. (2010) Phenex: Ontological Annotation of Phenotypic Diversity. PLoS ONE, 5(5). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0010500  

  • August 27, 2014
  • 09:18 AM
  • 132 views

Co-Chaperone Keeps Close Watch on Mice Sperm Production

by Christina Szalinski in ASCB Post

Chaperones aren't just for high-school homecoming dances. Cells have chaperones as well, chaperone proteins that ensure newly made proteins are properly folded. If protein folding goes awry, diseases associated with misfolded proteins such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's can arise. But if one set of chaperones can throw a wet blanket on a school dance, imagine a second set of co-chaperones just to keep the chaperones in check. That's the growing picture in cellular chaperoning........ Read more »

  • August 27, 2014
  • 08:25 AM
  • 150 views

Let’s Chew The Fat

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

If vegetables are low fat, how can we make cooking oils from them? The key is that vegetable oils aren’t really vegetable oils- they’re fruit oils. In some plant fruits, the fats are sued to entice animals to eat them and disperse seeds. In other, the fats are used to provide energy for the embryonic plants. New research is showing that some plant oils have unique uses. A 2014 study shows that avocado oil is as good or better at stabilizing biochemical markers in patients with metabo........ Read more »

Carvajal-Zarrabal O, Nolasco-Hipolito C, Aguilar-Uscanga MG, Melo Santiesteban G, Hayward-Jones PM, & Barradas-Dermitz DM. (2014) Effect of dietary intake of avocado oil and olive oil on biochemical markers of liver function in sucrose-fed rats. BioMed research international, 595479. PMID: 24860825  

  • August 27, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 155 views

Just how diverse is this group, really?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We often make assumptions when discussing diversity that we all perceive a group’s diversity in the same way. Today’s research shows that simply isn’t so. That is, you and I (depending on our racial in-group) can look at the same group and you might say it is diverse while I say it is not. What […]

Related posts:
Improving working relationships in your ethnically diverse jury
Religion, ethnicity and Asian-American’s voting patterns
Proof we don’t hire the most qualified candid........ Read more »

  • August 27, 2014
  • 05:33 AM
  • 107 views

Gaming Against Depression: It Can Really Help

by Katja Keuchenius in United Academics

A meta-analysis of 19 different studies of game-based interventions shows encouraging results. And besides the big amount of games for youngsters, the researchers specifically point out much can be done with with therapeutic gaming for older adults.... Read more »

  • August 27, 2014
  • 03:56 AM
  • 100 views

Prenatal SSRI exposure and autistic traits

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quote to start today's post: "Our results suggest an association between prenatal SSRI exposure and autistic traits in children". That was a primary finding reported by Hanan El Marroun and colleagues [1] who looked at whether maternal depressive symptoms or a class of quite commonly used pharmaceutics - the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) - used to manage depressive symptoms, during pregnancy might impact on offspring development."Everything the light touches is our kingd........ Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 07:51 PM
  • 97 views

Needles in a haystack: questioning the “fluidity” of ELF

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

As I’ve earlier argued on this blog, sometimes the claims of “fluidity”, “diversity”, and “innovation” found in English as a lingua franca (ELF) research are overstated. It’s so diverse that even ordinary diversity won’t do – it’s “super-diversity” now. It could very well be ultra-mega-diversity-squared, but the question of the prominence of these presumably innovative […]... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 07:01 PM
  • 64 views

Narcotics Anonymous for military veterans

by DJMac in Recovery Review

A few years back in a city far, far away, I asked a consultant addiction psychiatrist why he did not refer any of his patients to NA. “There’s not a shred of evidence that it works,” he said. Even then he was misinformed, but I’ve thought many times since then about how his patients were [...]
The post Narcotics Anonymous for military veterans appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 02:50 PM
  • 81 views

August 26, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

If you have little ones in your house, you might assume that the phrase “randomly fluctuating forces” is referring to your home. This phrase actually refers to the background force in a cell coming from active and motor-driven cell processes. Today’s image is from a study that developed a way to measure these forces. Actin- and microtubule-based motors move many types of material around a cell to drive critical cellular events. These motor-driven movements and other active processe........ Read more »

Guo, M., Ehrlicher, A., Jensen, M., Renz, M., Moore, J., Goldman, R., Lippincott-Schwartz, J., Mackintosh, F., & Weitz, D. (2014) Probing the Stochastic, Motor-Driven Properties of the Cytoplasm Using Force Spectrum Microscopy. Cell, 158(4), 822-832. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.051  

  • August 26, 2014
  • 01:27 PM
  • 94 views

The Holographic Universe [we might Live in!]

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Are you feeling a little… flat? Well that might be because you are only in 2 dimensions. I know what you’re thinking, insane! Well first check the name of the business and second, check out the science. In fact, it may seem like a joke, but the math suggests that it could very well be true and with it could come a deeper understanding of the universe. Testing this hypothesis (which was first made in the late 90’s) has been harder to do than you might think, but that has now changed. We are........ Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 12:09 PM
  • 59 views

For These Bats, the Best Falsetto Wins Over the Ladies

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

A bat’s voice is its livelihood. Chirping and squeaking at just the right frequencies lets it echolocate food and stay alive. Sounding pretty isn’t the point—except when it is. For the first time, scientists think they’ve found a bat species in which females choose mates based on their voices. Even if a lower-frequency squeak might […]The post For These Bats, the Best Falsetto Wins Over the Ladies appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 05:17 AM
  • 46 views

Drinking small amounts of alcohol boosts people's sense of smell

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

As our modern world relies overwhelmingly on sight and sound to transmit information, it might not strike you quite how acute our sense of smell is. In fact we humans can outperform the most sensitive measuring instruments in detecting certain odours, and distinguish smells from strangers from those of our blood relations. Now new research suggests our natural olfactory talents may be even greater when we use modest amounts of alcohol to reduce our inhibitions.A team led by Yaara Endevelt-S........ Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 04:39 AM
  • 89 views

Brian Hooker's Hooked Hoax: Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) Vaccination and Autism Spectrum Disorder

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

10 years after the initial study by DeStefano et al. (2004) was conducted, famous anti-vaccine alarmist Brian Hooker, along with Andrew Wakefield, are talking about a "whistleblower" in the CDC claiming that the original data was fraudulent, and was masking a 336% increased risk in ASD in African American boys receiving the MMR vaccine "on time." Did Hooker prove anything in his new study, however? Only that he doesn't understand epidemiology or statistics.... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 03:55 AM
  • 76 views

76% of youths with autism meet ADHD diagnostic criteria?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Autism is not normally a stand-alone diagnosis. I've mentioned that point a few times on this blog, stressing how a clinical diagnosis of autism appears to increase the risk of various other behavioural, psychiatric and somatic diagnoses also [variably] being present over a lifetime. Part of that comorbidity has been talked about in discussions about ESSENCE (see here) and the excellent document produced by Treating Autism on medical comorbidities occurring alongside autism (see here) for exampl........ Read more »

  • August 25, 2014
  • 07:13 PM
  • 73 views

Zombie Ant Fungi knows it’s prey

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

So awhile back I was bored and to kill some time wisely I wrote this little bit on real life (sometime potential) zombies. It featured a special section on a particular group of fungi that created some really crazy zombie ants. Ants, which would do the bidding of the fungus, would eventually latch itself in a “death bite” and sprout the parasite from its head. Yeah I know, not a pleasant death. In any case new research is showing just how cool — and evidently smart — these fungi really a........ Read more »

de Bekker C, Quevillon LE, Smith PB, Fleming KR, Ghosh D, Patterson AD, & Hughes DP. (2014) Species-specific ant brain manipulation by a specialized fungal parasite. BMC evolutionary biology, 14(1), 166. PMID: 25085339  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 03:38 PM
  • 66 views

Unpacking Recovery Part 3: Can Patients Imagine Recovery?

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


Today I have the distinct pleasure of writing about one of my favourite articles about eating disorder recovery by Malson et al. (2011) exploring how inpatients talk about eating disorder recovery. I have personally found this article to be very helpful in understanding some of the difficulties of understanding and achieving recovery in our social context.
As Malson and colleagues explain (and as we’ve established), eating disorder recovery is elusive. Often, poor prognosis is described ........ Read more »

Malson H, Bailey L, Clarke S, Treasure J, Anderson G, & Kohn M. (2011) Un/imaginable future selves: a discourse analysis of in-patients' talk about recovery from an 'eating disorder'. European eating disorders review : the journal of the Eating Disorders Association, 19(1), 25-36. PMID: 21182163  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 02:56 PM
  • 67 views

Coronavirus proteases, p62/SQSTM1, and Deubiquitinases

by theloenvirologist in Virology Tidbits

Ubiquitin is a small protein of 9kDa inside present in all eukaryotic cells and involved in the degradation of proteins by covalently binding target proteins which requires different enzymes, the E1 activating enzyme, the E2 conjugation enzymes, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) can reverse the ubiquitination of substrates thus preventing the degradation of proteins and can be classified into two main classes, cysteine proteases and metalloproteases. Here the role of t........ Read more »

van Kasteren PB, Bailey-Elkin BA, James TW, Ninaber DK, Beugeling C, Khajehpour M, Snijder EJ, Mark BL, & Kikkert M. (2013) Deubiquitinase function of arterivirus papain-like protease 2 suppresses the innate immune response in infected host cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(9). PMID: 23401522  

Ratia K, Saikatendu KS, Santarsiero BD, Barretto N, Baker SC, Stevens RC, & Mesecar AD. (2006) Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus papain-like protease: structure of a viral deubiquitinating enzyme. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(15), 5717-22. PMID: 16581910  

Clementz MA, Chen Z, Banach BS, Wang Y, Sun L, Ratia K, Baez-Santos YM, Wang J, Takayama J, Ghosh AK.... (2010) Deubiquitinating and interferon antagonism activities of coronavirus papain-like proteases. Journal of virology, 84(9), 4619-29. PMID: 20181693  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 12:02 PM
  • 73 views

Spoiler Alert!: Are You Wasting Your Time Avoiding Spoilers?

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

Lately I have been cranking though a lot of media – TV, movies, books, podcasts, etc. To the point that I start to wonder how I have time for actual life. During this mass consumption of media, I've been thinking about, and discussing with friends, the topic of spoilers. Bring up this topic with just about anyone and you’ll find that it’s actually a pretty controversial one. As for me, I fall in the no spoilers category. Spoil one of my beloved TV shows and you will go from friend to “fr........ Read more »

Leavitt, J., & Christenfeld, N. (2011) Story Spoilers Don't Spoil Stories. Psychological Science, 22(9), 1152-1154. DOI: 10.1177/0956797611417007  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 11:11 AM
  • 62 views

E-cigs Aren't Safe

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Vaping through e-cigs brings out the harms in components of nicotine that are considered nanoparticles that can clog the smaller airways in our lungs.... Read more »

Grana, R., Benowitz, N., & Glantz, S. (2014) E-Cigarettes: A Scientific Review. Circulation, 129(19), 1972-1986. DOI: 10.1161/​CIRCULATIONAHA.114.007667  

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