Post List

  • November 17, 2014
  • 07:08 AM
  • 72 views

How guessing the wrong answer helps you learn the right answer

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Guessing, even wrongly, is thought toactivate webs of knowledge, which leadsto richer encoding of the correct answer. It's well known that taking tests helps us learn. The act of retrieving information from memory helps that information stick. This seems intuitive. More surprising is the recent discovery that guessing aids subsequent learning of the correct answer, even if your initial guess was wrong.Let's consider a simple example in the context of learning capital cities. Imagine you don........ Read more »

  • November 17, 2014
  • 04:41 AM
  • 64 views

Social anxiety in one in four adults with autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Twenty-eight percent (14 of 50) of individuals with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SAD [social anxiety disorder]"."I am Vulcan, sir. We embrace technicality."So said the findings reported by Susanne Bejerot and colleagues [1] (open-access) as part of their investigations looking at SAD occurrence among adults diagnosed with ASD. Once again the sometimes very disabling issue of anxiety resurfaces with autism in mind. Before going on, I'm minde........ Read more »

Bejerot S, Eriksson JM, & Mörtberg E. (2014) Social anxiety in adult autism spectrum disorder. Psychiatry research. PMID: 25200187  

  • November 17, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 52 views

Tag Us In! What Do Coaches Know About Exertional Heat Stroke and the Role of the Athletic Trainer?

by Yanira Dawson, Crystal Petrus, Savannah Kuester in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

High school football coaches are confident in their ability to handle exertional heat stroke but their knowledge is limited in this area. The coaches value and understand the role of athletic trainers.... Read more »

  • November 16, 2014
  • 08:05 PM
  • 60 views

Canine science catch up: 16-30 September 2014

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Gosh, it's been a busy ride since posting the excellent guest post by research, Cat Reeve, about her interesting detector dog research.  So now it's time to play catch up, starting with the canine science related things that we noticed in the second half of September, captured with the help of Storify - did you miss any of these?[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [16 - 30 September 2014]" on Storify]Further reading (some of the abstracts from Canine Science Forum 2014 now available):We........ Read more »

Westgarth Carri, & Hayley E. Christian. (2014) How can we motivate owners to walk their dogs more?. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.023  

Horowitz Alexandra, & Hecht Julie . (2014) Categories and consequences of dog-human play: A citizen science approach. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.052  

Browne Clare M., T. Mary Foster, & James S. McEwan. (2014) Dog training: Reinforcement timing and owner body language. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.059  

  • November 16, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 70 views

Soldiers and Suicide: A familiar tale

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

As a Marine, there is a special place in my heart for all things military. While most protesters are busy arguing about the people who are dying overseas, there is an even more disheartening statistic — the suicide statistics of service members here at home. Suicide is an ugly word, so it’s no surprise that there is not a large movement fighting for better care and a new study done on soldiers doesn’t help.... Read more »

  • November 16, 2014
  • 02:43 AM
  • 72 views

Bilingual students at the crossroads

by Livia Gerber in Language on the Move

Secondary education as a monolingual fork in the road Let me bust a prevalent urban myth: You do not need to be bi- or multilingual to become a linguist. There, busted. In fact, being bilingual initially brought me to a … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 15, 2014
  • 12:09 PM
  • 81 views

Telomeres, Epigenetics, and Aging: the new found complexities in your genes

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Telomere length is associated with aging, this isn’t a new statement, but interestingly enough there is more to this story than just the size of your telomeres. Telomere lengths have now been shown to cause epigenetic changes, this new discovery may help explain the aging of cells and how they initiate and transmit disease.... Read more »

Jerome D. Robin,, Andrew T. Ludlow,, Kimberly Batten,, Frederique Magdinier,, Guido Stadler,, Kathyrin R. Wagner,, Jerry W. Shay,, & Woodring E. Wright. (2014) Telomere position effect: regulation of gene expression with progressive telomere shortening over long distances. Genes . info:/

  • November 15, 2014
  • 07:28 AM
  • 139 views

How Your Facebook Updates Reveal Your Personality

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

The words you use in your Facebook profile reveal much about your personality, according to psychologists Gregory Park and colleagues in a new study just published. Based on a study of 71,000 Facebook users who reported their personality using an app, Park et al. found some quite unexpected words to be associated with given personality […]The post How Your Facebook Updates Reveal Your Personality appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Park G, Schwartz HA, Eichstaedt JC, Kern ML, Kosinski M, Stillwell DJ, Ungar LH, & Seligman ME. (2014) Automatic Personality Assessment Through Social Media Language. Journal of personality and social psychology. PMID: 25365036  

  • November 15, 2014
  • 04:40 AM
  • 76 views

Milk has gotta lotta bottle?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"High milk intake was associated with higher mortality in one cohort of women and in another cohort of men, and with higher fracture incidence in women". Those were some of the conclusions reached in the study by Karl Michaëlsson and colleagues [1] (open-access) looking at milk consumption and "mortality and fractures in women and men". The BBC among other media have covered the study (see here).Take me out tonightBased on quite a large participant group (two actually) who completed a food........ Read more »

Michaelsson, K., Wolk, A., Langenskiold, S., Basu, S., Warensjo Lemming, E., Melhus, H., & Byberg, L. (2014) Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies. BMJ, 349(oct27 1). DOI: 10.1136/bmj.g6015  

  • November 14, 2014
  • 07:20 PM
  • 95 views

Evolutionary Sins: The Gender Gap In Spatial Cognition And Navigation

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Recent research based on the Twe and Tjimba people of northwestern Namibia is suggested to lend evidence that gender gaps in spatial cognition are a result of evolutionary pressures, as men with higher spatial cognition are more successful in these tribes at mating and producing offspring. This post examines the literature and comes to a different conclusion, warning against hasty evolutionary explanations for behavioural traits.... Read more »

  • November 14, 2014
  • 03:38 PM
  • 150 views

Post-Operative Kidney Function in Living Kidney Donors vs. Renal Cell Cancer

by Cristy at Living Donor 101 in Living Donors Are People Too

The authors compared 94 pairs of living kidney donors and folks who underwent nephrectomy due a cancerous kidney tumor. Median pre-nephrectomy GFR was nearly equal for both groups. But:   In living kidney donors, median eGFR decreased by 34.4 % immediately after surgery. Compared with matched RN-patients, immediate postoperative [kidney function] is significantly more pronounced.   …
Continue reading »
The post Post-Operative Kidney Function in Living Kidney Donors vs. Ren........ Read more »

  • November 14, 2014
  • 02:39 PM
  • 70 views

Chlamydia and Cancer: A new connection

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Infections due to the sexually transmitted bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis often remain unnoticed. The pathogen is not only a common cause of female infertility; it is also suspected of increasing the risk of abdominal cancer. A new study has now observed the breakdown of an important endogenous protective factor in the course of chlamydial infection. In other words, the pathogen can cause an increased risk of certain cancers.... Read more »

González E, Rother M, Kerr MC, Al-Zeer MA, Abu-Lubad M, Kessler M, Brinkmann V, Loewer A, & Meyer TF. (2014) Chlamydia infection depends on a functional MDM2-p53 axis. Nature communications, 5201. PMID: 25392082  

  • November 14, 2014
  • 02:00 PM
  • 58 views

The Friday Five for 11/14/2014

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

New Friday Five at THE ‘SCOPE! Cool science news! #diets #Interstellar #cats #ozzy... Read more »

Montague, M., Li, G., Gandolfi, B., Khan, R., Aken, B., Searle, S., Minx, P., Hillier, L., Koboldt, D., Davis, B.... (2014) Comparative analysis of the domestic cat genome reveals genetic signatures underlying feline biology and domestication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1410083111  

  • November 14, 2014
  • 11:19 AM
  • 66 views

Worm Defies Tradition, Stores Gut Bacteria in Gills Instead

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

What—just because they’re called gut microbes, you’ve been keeping them in your colon? How unoriginal. This is Bankia setacea, also called the Northwest or feathery shipworm. Humans usually pay attention to shipworms only when they perform their namesake activity: burrowing face-first into our boats or docks and eating their way through. Shipworms are bivalves, like clams […]The post Worm Defies Tradition, Stores Gut Bacteria in Gills Instead appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

O'Connor, R., Fung, J., Sharp, K., Benner, J., McClung, C., Cushing, S., Lamkin, E., Fomenkov, A., Henrissat, B., Londer, Y.... (2014) Gill bacteria enable a novel digestive strategy in a wood-feeding mollusk. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1413110111  

  • November 14, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 84 views

Breaking Research: Lithium may protect against Alzheimer’s and other aging-related diseases

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

As human life expectancy continues to increase at a steady rate in most countries worldwide, the prevalence of aging-related diseases is also increasing. One such example is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the aging population. There is currently no cure for AD, and the only treatments that exist temporarily cover […]... Read more »

  • November 14, 2014
  • 06:41 AM
  • 46 views

Reformers say psychologists should change how they report their results, but does anyone understand the alternative?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

The rectangular bars indicate samplemeans and the red lines represent theconfidence intervals surrounding them.Image: Audriusa/WikipediaPsychological science is undergoing a process of soul-searching and self-improvement. The reasons vary but include failed replications of high-profile findings, evidence of bias in what gets published, and surveys suggestive of questionable research practices.Among the proposed solutions is that psychologists should change the way they report their fin........ Read more »

Hoekstra, R., Morey, R., Rouder, J., & Wagenmakers, E. (2014) Robust misinterpretation of confidence intervals. Psychonomic Bulletin , 21(5), 1157-1164. DOI: 10.3758/s13423-013-0572-3  

  • November 14, 2014
  • 04:40 AM
  • 88 views

One fifth of schizophrenia cases linked to Toxoplasma gondii?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The PAF [population attributable fraction] for schizophrenia in those exposed to T. gondii is tentatively 21.4%". That was the headline conclusion made by Prof. Gary Smith [1] in his modelling analysis estimating what percentage of cases of schizophrenia might involve the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. Some of the accompanying media about this potentially very important finding can be found here and here.You don't need to study scaring, you just do it.Although no expert on the PAF - defined as [2........ Read more »

  • November 14, 2014
  • 03:00 AM
  • 6 views

Nephron-sparing surgery reduces the risk of cardiovascular events

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

Radical nephrectomy is generally the preferred method to treat advanced kidney cancers, while partial nephrectomy is performed when the disease is localised, or if the patient has a genetic predisposition to developing kidney tumours. However, a recent study suggests that … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 13, 2014
  • 10:10 PM
  • 75 views

Wikipedia can help in prediction of disease outbreaks

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Wikipedia can be used to predict diseases
Main Points:

Wikipedia can be used to monitor and forecast diseases throughout the world.
Published in:

PLOS Computational Biology
Study Further:

Researchers have successfully monitored outbreaks of different diseases in different parts of the world with the help of Wikipedia. They have successfully worked on influenza outbreaks in the United States, Japan, Poland, and Thailand; dengue fever in Thailand and Brazil; and tuberculosis in China a........ Read more »

Generous, N., Fairchild, G., Deshpande, A., Del Valle, S., & Priedhorsky, R. (2014) Global Disease Monitoring and Forecasting with Wikipedia. PLoS Computational Biology, 10(11). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003892  

  • November 13, 2014
  • 05:28 PM
  • 57 views

Hard times, tough gods

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

Almost all cultures have some kind of supernatural beliefs. But it may surprise you to know that belief in moralising supernatural beings, who care about whether mortals do good or bad, are far from universal. That’s fascinating, and it begs the question: “why?”. Why do some cultures bother to believe spirits who watch over us [Read More...]

... Read more »

Botero CA, Gardner B, Kirby KR, Bulbulia J, Gavin MC, & Gray RD. (2014) The ecology of religious beliefs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25385605  

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