Post List

  • January 11, 2016
  • 03:23 PM
  • 176 views

Stereotype means girls should expect poorer physics grades

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Imagine that you are a female student and give the exact same answer to a physics exam question as one of your male classmates, but you receive a significantly poorer grade. This is precisely what happens on a regular basis, as concluded in a study by Sarah Hofer, a researcher in the group led by ETH professor Elsbeth Stern.... Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 02:29 PM
  • 93 views

Babies’ Microbiome Affected by Cesarean Section and Formula Feeding

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Annie Gatewood Hoen, PhD  Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and of Biomedical Data Science and Juliette Madan, MD, MS Associate Professor of Pediatrics The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Lebanon, NH 03756 Medical Research: What … Continue reading →
The post Babies’ Microbiome Affected by Cesarean Section and Formula Feeding appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Annie Gatewood Hoen, PhD, & Juliette Madan, MD, MS. (2016) Babies' Microbiome Affected by Cesarean Section and Formula Feeding. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 02:17 PM
  • 82 views

Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Are At Increased Risk of Cancer Mortality

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sergio A. Acuna, MD Graduate Student at St. Michael’s Hospital and IHPME University of Toronto Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Acuna: Solid organ transplant recipients are known to be at greater risk of developing … Continue reading →
The post Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Are At Increased Risk of Cancer Mortality appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dr. Sergio A. Acuna. (2016) Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Are At Increased Risk of Cancer Mortality. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 01:48 PM
  • 73 views

Exercise and Education Prevent Back Pain, Devices Do Not

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Daniel Steffens, Ph.D. The George Institute for Global Health The University of Sydney Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Steffens: Back pain is a leading cause of disease burden globally. At present, a … Continue reading →
The post Exercise and Education Prevent Back Pain, Devices Do Not appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Daniel Steffens, Ph.D. (2015) Exercise and Education Prevent Back Pain, Devices Do Not. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 12:39 PM
  • 179 views

Pallor, green sickness, and blue-grey patches: The colours of broken blood

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Anemia is a condition where the ability of your blood to transport oxygen throughout your body is somehow compromised. People with anemia often feel tired and weak since their cells aren't getting enough of the gas to function optimally.Our blood contains red blood cells, which in turn contain a red molecule called hemoglobin. Each of the four proteins making up a hemoglobin is equipped with an atom of oxygen-binding iron. Anemia can be the result of not having enough red blood cells or these ce........ Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 10:33 AM
  • 216 views

How to evaluate an argument like a trained scientist

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

From the pontifications of the politician on the nightly news, to the latest tabloid health scare, we're constantly bombarded by other people's arguments – their attempts to make a particular claim based on some kind of evidence. How best to evaluate all these assertions and counter-assertions? Some insights come from a new study in the journal Thinking and Reasoning that's compared the argument evaluation strategies of scientists (advanced doctoral students and post-docs in psychology) with t........ Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 07:39 AM
  • 89 views

Treatment of Sleep Disorders Reduced Congestive Heart Failure Readmissions

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sunil Sharma MD, FAASM Associate Professor of Medicine Director, Pulmonary Sleep Medicine Associate Director, Jefferson Sleep Disorders Center Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals Philadelphia, PA 19107 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Sharma: … Continue reading →
The post Treatment of Sleep Disorders Reduced Congestive Heart Failure Readmissions appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dr. Sunil Sharma. (2016) Treatment of Sleep Disorders Reduced Congestive Heart Failure Readmissions. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 07:06 AM
  • 173 views

Natural clays can help in the fight against bacteria

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Natural clay (such as Oregon Blue clay) can help in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens including antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Published in:

Scientific Reports

Study Further:

Researchers have reported that natural antibacterial clays upon hydration and topical application can kill human pathogens and these pathogens also include antibiotic resistant strains. They noted that only certain clays are bactericidal in nature. Those clays having soluble reduced met........ Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 06:35 AM
  • 123 views

Depression reduces the chances of reaching good cardiovascular health

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

High level of depression is an important barrier to achieve best cardiovascular health.

Published in:

Scientific Reports

Study Further:

Cardiovascular problems are among the important causes of mortality throughout the world, that’s why researchers are working on the cardiovascular disorders and causes behind them. Some of the important causes or factors behind cardiovascular disorders are blood pressure, smoking (especially in men), and lipids. Some other risk f........ Read more »

Gaye, B., Prugger, C., Perier, M., Thomas, F., Plichart, M., Guibout, C., Lemogne, C., Pannier, B., Boutouyrie, P., Jouven, X.... (2016) High level of depressive symptoms as a barrier to reach an ideal cardiovascular health. The Paris Prospective Study III. Scientific Reports, 18951. DOI: 10.1038/srep18951  

  • January 11, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 169 views

Help Yourself Improve Dorsiflexion A Little More

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A dynamic self-stretching technique may improve dorsiflexion even better than traditional self-stretching due to a strap that aids in gliding the talus posteriorly relative to the distal tibia to improve arthrokinematics.... Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 02:48 AM
  • 183 views

Fish oils for schizophrenia?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Hot on the heels of the peer-reviewed research-based suggestion that fish oil supplementation (high in omega-3 PUFAs) might have some rather important effects pertinent to the transition to full-threshold psychotic disorder for 'young people with an at-risk mental state' (see here), are the results from Tomasz Pawełczyk and colleagues [1].This time around it was a randomised, placebo-controlled trial "of either 2.2 g/day of n-3 PUFA, or olive oil placebo, with regard to symptom severity in firs........ Read more »

  • January 10, 2016
  • 03:21 PM
  • 152 views

Gene drive - take the wheel against malaria

by Syed Ather in Heuristic

Scientists are coming closer and closer to the dreams of genetic engineering just about
anything for any purpose. Now we can drive those dreams home by engineering mosquitos in
order to eliminate malaria, one of the biggest health and economic threats faced by
developing nations.... Read more »

Gantz, V., Jasinskiene, N., Tatarenkova, O., Fazekas, A., Macias, V., Bier, E., & James, A. (2015) Highly efficient Cas9-mediated gene drive for population modification of the malaria vector mosquito . Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(49). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1521077112  

  • January 10, 2016
  • 02:37 PM
  • 179 views

Put the cellphone away! Fragmented baby care can affect brain development

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Mothers, put down your smartphones when caring for your babies! That's the message from University of California, Irvine researchers, who have found that fragmented and chaotic maternal care can disrupt proper brain development, which can lead to emotional disorders later in life.... Read more »

  • January 10, 2016
  • 02:09 PM
  • 164 views

Sources of Error: Epiphenomenalism (part 1)

by Sergio Graziosi in Writing my own user manual - Sergio Graziosi's Blog

Epiphenomenalism is one idea I’ve struggled with for a long time: to my eyes, it doesn’t make any sense. But more importantly, when applied to philosophy of mind, it seems to me that epiphenomenalism does a great deal of damage.…Read more ›... Read more »

Swinburne, Richard. (2011) Could anyone justifiably believe epiphenomenalism?. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 18(3-4), 196-216. info:/

  • January 10, 2016
  • 07:48 AM
  • 58 views

10% of Patients Receiving Implantable Defibrillators Are Frail Or Have Dementia

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ariel R. Green, M.D., M.P.H Assistant Professor of Medicine Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are widely used to … Continue reading →
The post 10% of Patients Receiving Implantable Defibrillators Are Frail Or Have Dementia appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dr. Ariel Green Frank. (2016) 10% of Patients Receiving Implantable Defibrillators Are Frail Or Have Dementia. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 10, 2016
  • 07:00 AM
  • 72 views

Endosperm: the pivot of the sexual conflict in flowering plants

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll The theory of sexual selection, based on the idea that there are conflict of interests between males and females, is quite recognized, but almost entirely focused on animals, especially dioecious animals, i.e., animals in which males … Continue reading →... Read more »

Maruyama, D., Hamamura, Y., Takeuchi, H., Susaki, D., Nishimaki, M., Kurihara, D., Kasahara, R., & Higashiyama, T. (2013) Independent Control by Each Female Gamete Prevents the Attraction of Multiple Pollen Tubes. Developmental Cell, 25(3), 317-323. DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2013.03.013  

Schärer, L., Janicke, T., & Ramm, S. (2015) Sexual Conflict in Hermaphrodites. Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology, 7(1). DOI: 10.1101/cshperspect.a017673  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 07:40 PM
  • 45 views

Almost 90% Gastric Bypass Patients Feel Better After Surgery

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Sigrid Bjerge Gribsholt MD, PhD Student Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital 8000 Aarhus C Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Based on our clinical … Continue reading →
The post Almost 90% Gastric Bypass Patients Feel Better After Surgery appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dr. Sigrid Bjerge Gribsholt. (2016) Almost 90% Gastric Bypass Patients Feel Better After Surgery. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 9, 2016
  • 04:23 PM
  • 178 views

Multi-Methodological Research in Supply Chain Management

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

Just like OM research, SCM research is dominated by three research methodologies: (1) analytical modelling research (optimization, computational, and simulation models etc.), (2) quantitative empirical research (surveys etc., and (3) case study research. There has been a recent trend towards multi-methodological research that combines different methodologies. A new article by Choi, Cheng and Zhao, titled […]... Read more »

Choi, T., Cheng, T., & Zhao, X. (2015) Multi-Methodological Research in Operations Management. Production and Operations Management. DOI: 10.1111/poms.12534  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 03:36 PM
  • 195 views

Turning to the “Infected Jelly” to Treat Ebola

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The NEJM has come out with a very interesting paper: Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The explosive outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in West Africa last year had hijacked the headlines and media space in a big way. Multiple solutions were touted, including the vaccine trial STRIVE. Few articles, however, looked…... Read more »

van Griensven J, Edwards T, de Lamballerie X, Semple MG, Gallian P, Baize S, Horby PW, Raoul H, Magassouba N, Antierens A.... (2016) Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The New England journal of medicine, 374(1), 33-42. PMID: 26735992  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 02:36 PM
  • 241 views

Feeling sick? It’s evolution’s way of telling you to stay home

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

When you have a fever, your nose is stuffed and your headache is spreading to your toes, your body is telling you to stay home in bed. Feeling sick is an evolutionary adaptation according to a hypothesis put forward by Prof. Guy Shakhar of the Weizmann Institute’s Immunology Department and Dr. Keren Shakhar of the Psychology Department of the College of Management Academic Studies.... Read more »

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