Post List

  • August 8, 2015
  • 08:44 AM
  • 121 views

About 50% of Meniscus Transplants Fail by Ten Years

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Frank R. Noyes, M.D. President and Medical Director, Noyes Knee Institute and the Cincinnati Sports medicine Research and Education Foundation Cincinnati, Ohio MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? Dr. Noyes: Meniscectomy, or removal of the … Continue reading →
The post About 50% of Meniscus Transplants Fail by Ten Years appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
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Frank R. Noyes, M.D. (2015) About 50% of Meniscus Transplants Fail by Ten Years. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 8, 2015
  • 08:13 AM
  • 109 views

Treatment of Patent Ductus Arteriosus Linked to Neurodevelopmental Risks in Infants

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Abdel-Latif Mohamed Discipline of Neonatology, Medical School, College of Medicine, Biology & Environment Australian National University Acton, Canberra, ACT, Australia Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Prof. Mohamed: Despite … Continue reading →
The post Treatment of Patent Ductus Arteriosus Linked to Neurodevelopmental Risks in Infants appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Rese........ Read more »

Prof. Abdel-Latif Mohamed. (2015) Treatment of Patent Ductus Arteriosus Linked to Neurodevelopmental Risks in Infants. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 8, 2015
  • 02:20 AM
  • 154 views

Optimal outcome and the autism spectrum: implications for the risk of psychiatric comorbidity?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The minority of the AS [Asperger syndrome] group who no longer met criteria for a full diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder were usually free of current psychiatric comorbidity."That was one of the details reported by I. Carina Gillberg and colleagues [1] continuing their longitudinal look at a group of males diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and participants' experiences as a function of their presented symptoms and risk of other comorbidity.Titled 'Boys with Asperger Sy........ Read more »

  • August 7, 2015
  • 02:27 PM
  • 156 views

Switching mouse neural stem cells to a primate-like behavior

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

When the right gene is expressed in the right manner in the right population of stem cells, the developing mouse brain can exhibit primate-like features. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) succeeded in mimicking the sustained expression of the transcription factor Pax6 as seen in the developing human brain, in mouse cortical progenitor cells. This altered the behavior of these cells to one that is akin to that of progenitors in the developing........ Read more »

Fong Kuan Wong, Ji-Feng Fei, Felipe Mora-Bermúdez, Elena Taverna, Christiane Haffner, Jun Fu, Konstantinos Anastassiadis, A. Francis Stewart, & Wieland B. Huttner. (2015) Sustained Pax6 Expression Generates Primate-like Basal Radial Glia in Developing Mouse Neocortex. PLOS Biology. info:/10.1371/journal.pbio.1002217

  • August 7, 2015
  • 01:00 PM
  • 141 views

Excessive workout supplement use: An emerging eating disorder in men?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In an effort to build better bodies, more men are turning not to illegal anabolic steroids, but to legal over-the-counter bodybuilding supplements to the point where it may qualify as an emerging eating disorder, according to research presented at the American Psychological Association’s annual convention.... Read more »

Richard Achiro et al. (2015) Excessive Workout Supplement Use: An Emerging Eating Disorder in Men. American Psychological Association. info:/Other

  • August 7, 2015
  • 11:55 AM
  • 94 views

What do long-distance runners think about?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Marathon runners are on the road for hours at a time, what on earth goes through their minds all that time? Past investigations have relied on asking runners to remember what they were thinking about, but of course that is an unreliable method. Now Ashley Samson and her team have conducted the first ever "think aloud" investigation of long-distance runners, which involves them verbalising "everything that passes through your head", so that their thoughts can be recorded and analysed. The researc........ Read more »

Samson, A., Simpson, D., Kamphoff, C., & Langlier, A. (2015) Think aloud: An examination of distance runners’ thought processes. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 1-14. DOI: 10.1080/1612197X.2015.1069877  

  • August 7, 2015
  • 10:54 AM
  • 94 views

Spinach Extract May Reduce Hunger and Caloric Intake

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Candida J. Rebello and Dr. Frank Greenway Pennington Biomedical Research Center Baton Rouge, Louisiana MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Appethyl™ contains concentrated thylakoid membranes extracted from spinach leaves. … Continue reading →
The post Spinach Extract May Reduce Hunger and Caloric Intake appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Candida J. Rebello and Dr. Frank Greenway. (2015) Spinach Extract May Reduce Hunger and Caloric Intake. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 7, 2015
  • 10:34 AM
  • 129 views

Vibram FiveFingers and muscle strength … umm, err…

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Vibram FiveFingers and muscle strength … umm, err…... Read more »

Campitelli, N., Bernhard, K., Kidon, A., Heard, K., Spencer, S., & Kawalec, J. (2015) Effect of Vibram FiveFingers Minimalist Shoes on the Abductor Hallucis Muscle. Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, 2147483647. DOI: 10.7547/14-084.1  

  • August 7, 2015
  • 10:32 AM
  • 159 views

Scientists Want Your Slips of the Tongue

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



You know that feeling when you're halfway through a sentence and can't think of the next word you need? It's a word you know, but you can't quite bring it to mind. There's a name for that phenomenon...what is it, again?

Oh right, the "tip of the tongue."

Everyday failures in our speech, like forgetting a word or saying the wrong one, are great fodder for scientists who want to understand language. But they're hard to study in the lab, because you can't force someone to make a mistake. ... Read more »

Michael S. Vitevitch. (2015) Speech error and tip-of-the-tongue diary for mobile devices. Frontiers in Psychology. info:/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01190

  • August 7, 2015
  • 10:13 AM
  • 146 views

No Evidence for an Early Dementia Epidemic

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Another day, another alarming brain-related story hits the news:
Dementia is striking victims earlier and death rates are soaring

Modern living has led to earlier dementia, says study

In fact the study in question doesn't show that. The paper, published in Surgical Neurological International (see also) is from British researchers Colin Pritchard and Emily Rosenorn-Lanng.



The authors show that the number of deaths attributed to neurological diseases (including dementia) have risen ... Read more »

  • August 7, 2015
  • 09:46 AM
  • 101 views

Botulinum Toxin Reduces Pain of Skin Leiomyomas

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Edward W. Cowen, MD, MHSc Dermatology Branch, Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute Bethesda, Maryland Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Cowen: Cutaneous leiomyomas are benign smooth muscle proliferations that are associated with pain … Continue reading →
The post Botulinum Toxin Reduces Pain of Skin Leiomyomas appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Edward W. Cowen, MD, MHSc. (2015) Botulinum Toxin Reduces Pain of Skin Leiomyomas. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 7, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 49 views

High-throughput screening to identify synthetic lethal compounds in RCC

by Danielle Stevenson in BHD Research Blog

Synthetic lethal compounds selectively kill cancer cells by targeting tumour cell-essential processes, but leave healthy cells unharmed. Research is ongoing to identify such compounds in a range of cancers (reviewed in McLornan et al., 2014) including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). New research from Wolff et al., (2015) has identified homoharringtonine (HHT) as synthetically lethal for a subset of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) tumours associated with VHL mutations.... Read more »

  • August 7, 2015
  • 08:56 AM
  • 90 views

ACE Level Lowered by ACE Inhibitors Can Falsely Rule Out Sarcoidosis

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Matthew D. Krasowski MD, PhD Department of Pathology University of Iowa, Iowa City, and Jonathan Genzen, MD, PhD Department of Pathology University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post ACE Level Lowered by ACE Inhibitors Can Falsely Rule Out Sarcoidosis appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Matthew D. Krasowski MD, PhD and Jonathan Genzen, MD, PhD. (2015) ACE Level Lowered by ACE Inhibitors Can Falsely Rule Out Sarcoidosis. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 7, 2015
  • 08:38 AM
  • 104 views

NSAIDS Work For Menses Pain But Carry Risk of Side Effects

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jane Marjoribanks Obstetrics and Gynaecology University of Auckland, National Women’s Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? Response: This study is a systematic review of all randomised evidence published up to January … Continue reading →
The post NSAIDS Work For Menses Pain But Carry Risk of Side Effects appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Jane Marjoribanks. (2015) NSAIDS Work For Menses Pain But Carry Risk of Side Effects. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 7, 2015
  • 08:36 AM
  • 134 views

Fight to the Death! Violence and Trauma in Post-Medieval Romania

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Right now I’m working on the historical background to my dissertation, which means reading a lot of historical texts and history books on early medieval England. As an archaeologist, I’ve […]... Read more »

  • August 7, 2015
  • 08:20 AM
  • 81 views

Simple Internet Program Increased Handwashing and Reduced Infections

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Paul Little MBBS, BA, MD, DLSHTM, MRCP, FRCGP, FMedSci Professor of Primary Care Research University of Southampton Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Prof. Little: Hand washing has been … Continue reading →
The post Simple Internet Program Increased Handwashing and Reduced Infections appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Paul Little MBBS, BA, MD. (2015) Simple Internet Program Increased Handwashing and Reduced Infections. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 7, 2015
  • 07:38 AM
  • 124 views

Seeing With Bionic Eyes!

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Pulse trains to percepts: the challenge of creating a perceptually intelligible world with sight recovery technologies.... Read more »

  • August 7, 2015
  • 02:32 AM
  • 109 views

Immune related genes and pathways feature in 22q11DS-ASD

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quick post for your consumption today based on the findings reported by Maria Jalbrzikowski and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) who undertook "genomic analyses of 22q11DS to identify genes and pathways related to specific phenotypes." 22q11DS - 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome - is a genetic condition characterised by a deletion of a small piece of genetic material of chromosome 22. Autism is among several presentations that can co-occur in cases of 22q11DS (sometimes called Del........ Read more »

  • August 6, 2015
  • 04:54 PM
  • 92 views

Cellular zombies: Mutant cells that can’t copy DNA keep dividing when they shouldn’t

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Researchers at USC have developed a yeast model to study a gene mutation that disrupts the duplication of DNA, causing massive damage to a cell’s chromosomes, while somehow allowing the cell to continue dividing. The result is a mess: Zombie cells that by all rights shouldn’t be able to survive, let alone divide, with their […]... Read more »

  • August 6, 2015
  • 01:42 PM
  • 105 views

Juicing for fungi and oomycetes

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Many fungi and oomycetes (fungus-like microbes often called water moulds) like to eat plants. Unfortunately for us, these plants include basically all of the ones we grow for food. Thus another front of the human-microbe war rages ever onward. In an effort to gain an edge against our dastardly eukaryotic cousins, scientists have compiled a whole lot of data on how plant-eating fungi and oomycetes go about their business. To grow these microorganisms in the laboratory, researchers have taken the ........ Read more »

Galkiewicz, J., Stellick, S., Gray, M., & Kellogg, C. (2012) Cultured fungal associates from the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa. Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 12-20. DOI: 10.1016/j.dsr.2012.05.001  

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