Post List

  • November 2, 2010
  • 11:06 AM
  • 1,009 views

The molecular pathology of cancer: a glimpse into the future

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

Here’s a nice paper that I’ve been reading, written by Tim Harris and Frank McCormick on cancer biology.  Lately, we’ve all seen how advances in DNA sequencing and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are driving the discovery of the germline and … Continue reading →... Read more »

Harris, T., & McCormick, F. (2010) The molecular pathology of cancer. Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, 7(5), 251-265. DOI: 10.1038/nrclinonc.2010.41  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 09:42 AM
  • 830 views

The Brain Suppresses Incorrect Competing Memories

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

Imagine that you are trying to remember the name of actor Kevin Bacon, but the name of someone you went to college with, Michael Bacon, keeps getting in the way. ... Read more »

Healey, M.K., Campbell, K.L., Hasher, L., & Ossher, L. (2010) Direct evidence for the role of inhibition in resolving interference in memory. Psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science/ APS. PMID: 20807896  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 08:13 AM
  • 930 views

Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfates for Inflammatory Diseases

by Michael Long in Phased

Rainer Haag (Freie Universitat Berlin) and coworkers have synthesized a branched polymer that potently inhibits L and P selectin activity in mice, and thus shows promise as a treatment for inflammatory diseases.... Read more »

Dernedde, J., Rausch, A., Weinhart, M., Enders, S., Tauber, R., Licha, K., Schirner, M., Zugel, U., von Bonin, A., & Haag, R. (2010) Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates as multivalent inhibitors of inflammation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1003103107  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,813 views

How Poverty-Promotes Obesity in Indonesia

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

I have previously blogged about the importance of maternal ill-health and malnutrition as a key driver of the childhood obesity epidemic. Not surprisingly, this statement appears even more relevant, when we look at the emerging obesity epidemic in developing countries.
Thus in an article just released online in Obesity Reviews, Avita Usfar and colleagues examine obesity [...]... Read more »

Usfar AA, Lebenthal E, Atmarita, Achadi E, Soekirman, & Hadi H. (2010) Obesity as a poverty-related emerging nutrition problems: the case of Indonesia. Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity. PMID: 20977602  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 07:11 AM
  • 833 views

Bacterial electricity

by Becky in It Takes 30

What is electricity?  It’s moving electrons.  Every living thing moves electrons around, not just in nerves (for those of us that have them) but also in metabolism (oxidize one thing, reduce another). Is it possible to use this metabolic electricity to communicate with man-made devices?  If you could, you might be able to make very [...]... Read more »

Jensen HM, Albers AE, Malley KR, Londer YY, Cohen BE, Helms BA, Weigele P, Groves JT, & Ajo-Franklin CM. (2010) Engineering of a synthetic electron conduit in living cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 20956333  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 05:32 AM
  • 640 views

Twenty years of progress? English education policy 1988 to the present

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From Educational Management Administration Leadership This article reflects on the changes in policy focus over the last two decades following the 1988 Education Reform Act (ERA). It shows the significant continuities between Conservative and New Labour policies in terms of the drive for an essentially market-based education system, with a trend towards the decentralization of [...]... Read more »

  • November 2, 2010
  • 05:00 AM
  • 1,035 views

Asian Strokes Are Not Same as Western

by Steve Parker, M.D. in Advanced Mediterranean Diet

The higher the consumption of saturated fat, the lower the risk of death from stroke, according to Japanese researchers in a recent American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 
Most physicians in the West would have predicted the opposite: saturated fats increase your risk of stroke.  Western physicians tend to think most strokes and heart attacks are caused [...]... Read more »

  • November 2, 2010
  • 04:49 AM
  • 876 views

Resilience, catastrophising and positive emotions

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

Catastrophising, or thinking the worst, is one of those psychological factors that we know influences distress and disability in people with chronic pain. It’s quite a common phenomenon, and sometimes can stand us in good stead – after all, if we can think of the worst things that can happen, then plan to avert those … Read more... Read more »

  • November 2, 2010
  • 02:35 AM
  • 2,404 views

Morningness versus Eveningness

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


Interesting topic: morningness versus eveningness. My self I am a morningness person. Early to rise, get most of the work done in the morning.
In colloquial terms, individuals oriented towards morning types were often labelled ‘‘Larks”,
and individuals oriented towards eveningness were labelled ‘‘Owls”
Morningness and eveningness is part of our chronotype. Besides heritable factors our chronotype [...]


Related posts:Good characters make good motivated medical students?
What Kind ........ Read more »

  • November 1, 2010
  • 11:52 PM
  • 697 views

Write for your brain

by NeuroKüz in NeuroKüz

Remember the days when writing by hand was more common than typing?While those days may be gone, the ability to write by hand is indisputably still useful. This is why getting writer's cramp -- an often-painful condition that inhibits one's ability to write -- can be quite an annoyance.Luckily, there are several forms of intervention that can be effective in alleviating writer's cramp. In a new study published in NeuroImage, Oliver Granert and colleagues examined how a couple of treatments for w........ Read more »

Granert O, Peller M, Gaser C, Groppa S, Hallett M, Knutzen A, Deuschl G, Zeuner KE, & Siebner HR. (2011) Manual activity shapes structure and function in contralateral human motor hand area. NeuroImage, 54(1), 32-41. PMID: 20708692  

  • November 1, 2010
  • 10:29 PM
  • 1,672 views

Witchcraft or Psychedelic Trip?

by Dan Bailey in Smells Like Science

Were the Salem Witch Trials sparked by grain infected with toxic hallucinogens?... Read more »

  • November 1, 2010
  • 10:11 PM
  • 1,046 views

5 ways to gain a lover

by aimee in misc.ience

Yes, it is a shameful, shameful misappropriation of a great song, but I couldn’t help myself.

Not even a little bit.
And seriously, there are, apparently, five different styles of flirting.  An ‘inventory’*, if you will.  And what, pray (or, possibly, prey) are they?  Read on, dear reader!
Traditional
This is based very much in traditional gender roles.  You [...]

[Click on the hyperlinked headline for more of the goodness]... Read more »

Jeffrey A. Hall, Steve Carter, Michael J. Cody, . (2010) Individual Differences in the Communication of Romantic Interest: Development of the Flirting Styles Inventory. Communication Quarterly. info:/10.1080/01463373.2010.524874

  • November 1, 2010
  • 08:35 PM
  • 1,087 views

The diversity of values held by conservation scientists and why this matters

by Phil Camill in Global Change: Intersection of Nature and Culture


Right up there with climate change, biodiversity conservation is one of the most challenging issues at the intersection of nature and culture.  Part of this challenge arises because of genuine differences in how people value other species.
In an interesting forthcoming article in Conservation Biology, Chris Sandbrook and colleagues at Cambridge University argue that these value [...]... Read more »

SANDBROOK, C., SCALES, I., VIRA, B., & ADAMS, W. (2010) Value Plurality among Conservation Professionals. Conservation Biology. DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2010.01592.x  

  • November 1, 2010
  • 07:46 PM
  • 1,382 views

Evolution: A Game Of Chance?

by Christie Wilcox in Observations of a Nerd

One of the toughest concepts to grasp about evolution is its lack of direction. Take the classic image of the evolution of man, from knuckle-walking ape to strong, smart hunter:

We view this as the natural progression of life. Truth is, there was no guarantee that some big brained apes in Africa would end up like we are now. It wasn't inevitable that we grew taller, less hairy, and smarter than our relatives. And it certainly wasn't guaranteed that single celled bacteria-like critters ended up ........ Read more »

XU Xing, & GUO Yu. (2009) THE ORIGIN AND EARLY EVOLUTION OF FEATHERS: INSIGHTS FROM RECENT PALEONTOLOGICAL AND NEONTOLOGICAL DATA. Verbrata PalAsiatica, 47(4), 311-329. info:/

Perrichot, V., Marion, L., Neraudeau, D., Vullo, R., & Tafforeau, P. (2008) The early evolution of feathers: fossil evidence from Cretaceous amber of France. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 275(1639), 1197-1202. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.0003  

  • November 1, 2010
  • 07:46 PM
  • 539 views

Evolution: A Game Of Chance? [Observations of a Nerd]

by Christie Wilcox none@example.com in Food Matters

One of the toughest concepts to grasp about evolution is its lack of direction. Take the classic image of the evolution of man, from knuckle-walking ape to strong, smart hunter:

We view this as the natural progression of life. Truth is, there was no guarantee that some big brained primates in Africa would end up like we are now. It wasn't inevitable that we grew taller, less hairy, and smarter than our relatives. And it certainly wasn't guaranteed that single celled bacteria-like critters ended........ Read more »

XU Xing, & GUO Yu. (2009) THE ORIGIN AND EARLY EVOLUTION OF FEATHERS: INSIGHTS FROM RECENT PALEONTOLOGICAL AND NEONTOLOGICAL DATA. Verbrata PalAsiatica, 47(4), 311-329. info:/

Perrichot, V., Marion, L., Neraudeau, D., Vullo, R., & Tafforeau, P. (2008) The early evolution of feathers: fossil evidence from Cretaceous amber of France. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 275(1639), 1197-1202. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.0003  

  • November 1, 2010
  • 06:31 PM
  • 1,158 views

The Fruits of a Thousand Genomes

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

Last week saw the publication of the 1,000 Genomes Project, which has characterized ~15 million SNPs, 1 million short insertions/deletions (indels), and 20,000 structural variants in seven human populations. This is discovery and genotyping at unprecedented scale, with an astonishing 4.9 terabases (trillion bases) sequenced - the equivalent of about 1,500 human genomes - across [...]... Read more »

  • November 1, 2010
  • 06:00 PM
  • 1,156 views

Copulatory Plugs: Was it As Good for You As It Was For Me?

by Allie Wilkinson in OH, FOR THE LOVE OF SCIENCE!

Just who exactly benefits from copulatory plugs, anyway?  Mating plugs have been documented in a broad range of animal groups, including insects, arachnids, reptiles and rodents and range from a gelatinous substance in bees and nematodes, to a more solid, coagulated protein mixture in primates, or even the whole appendage breaking off in the vagina. [...]... Read more »

Nadine Timmermeyer, Tobias Gerlach, Christian Guempel, Johanna Knoche, Jens F Pfann, Daniel Schliessmann, & Nico K Michiels. (2010) The function of copulatory plugs in Caenorhabditis remanei: hints for female benefits. Frontiers in Zoology, 7(28). info:/10.1186/1742-9994-7-28

  • November 1, 2010
  • 04:34 PM
  • 2,100 views

Phiten Aqua-Titanium Necklaces: Sound Science or Hype?

by Brian Mossop in The Decision Tree

My latest post on Wired Playbook went up today, “Titanium Baseball Neckwear Big on Hype, Short on Science“, which looks at the science & tech behind the popular rope necklaces that many Major League Baseball players are wearing: During these 2010 Major League Baseball playoffs, you didn’t have to spend money on pricey playoff tickets, [...]... Read more »

  • November 1, 2010
  • 03:12 PM
  • 1,199 views

The BIG picture: Ecological effectiveness

by DeLene Beeland in Wild Muse

In an age when endangered species are often recovered just as much by force of legislation, á la the Endangered Species Act, as they are by scientific principles, I often find myself weighing the Big Picture of ecological effectiveness against the minutae of things like genes and mere numbers. Let me explain. I’m not knocking [...]... Read more »

  • November 1, 2010
  • 03:01 PM
  • 1,808 views

Enrichment in Captive Cephalopods

by Mike Mike in Cephalove

To get things started, here’s a video of an octopus with a Mr. Potato Head Toy (and other things): You’ll see why this is relevant in a minute. Now on to the post! “Enrichment” is a psychological term that’s been thrown around a lot. It’s become a buzzword in publications about education, perhaps rightly so [...]... Read more »

Anderson, R., & Wood, J. (2001) Enrichment for Giant Pacific Octopuses: Happy as a Clam?. Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science, 4(2), 157-168. DOI: 10.1207/S15327604JAWS0402_10  

van Praag H, Kempermann G, & Gage FH. (2000) Neural consequences of environmental enrichment. Nature reviews. Neuroscience, 1(3), 191-8. PMID: 11257907  

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