Post List

  • July 20, 2010
  • 02:25 AM
  • 1,876 views

Facebook and MySpace use among college students

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


This study was really about the question whether facebook and myspace replaced face to face interaction. Apparently conflicting results were reported. This study used a survey to examine the use of facebook and myspace among 183 college students an it confirmed that the use of these social media acted as an extension instead of a [...]


Related posts:Facebook and Academic Performance
The Social Capital Divide in MySpace
The Dangers of Facebook or Let’s Be Careful Out There
... Read more »

Carlyne L. Kujath, B.S. (2010) Facebook and MySpace: Complement or Substitute for Face-to-Face Interaction?. CYBERPSYCHOLOGY, BEHAVIOR, AND SOCIAL NETWORKING. info:/10.1089/cyber.2009.0311

  • July 20, 2010
  • 01:53 AM
  • 856 views

What do people really do about their back pain? An on-line survey reveals…

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

There are many studies describing the way treatment providers fail to follow clinical guidelines for managing acute low back pain – and because there are inconsistencies between various guidelines for chronic low back pain, it’s not surprising that people with back pain (whether acute or chronic) get a little confused about what to do.  Of … Read more... Read more »

  • July 20, 2010
  • 01:53 AM
  • 854 views

What do people really do about their back pain? An on-line survey reveals…

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

There are many studies describing the way treatment providers fail to follow clinical guidelines for managing acute low back pain – and because there are inconsistencies between various guidelines for chronic low back pain, it’s not surprising that people with back pain (whether acute or chronic) get a little confused about what to do.  Of … Read more... Read more »

  • July 20, 2010
  • 01:53 AM
  • 869 views

What do people really do about their back pain? An on-line survey reveals…

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

There are many studies describing the way treatment providers fail to follow clinical guidelines for managing acute low back pain – and because there are inconsistencies between various guidelines for chronic low back pain, it’s not surprising that people with back pain (whether acute or chronic) get a little confused about what to do.  Of … Read more... Read more »

  • July 19, 2010
  • 09:58 PM
  • 942 views

Your Happiness Kills Crustaceans

by Dr. M in Deep Sea News

Figure 2 from paper: Mean average phototaxis and geotaxis score of E. marinus exposed to varied concentrations of serotonin (n = 20 per treatment) over a 3-week period. Error bars to one standard deviation. *Significance compared with control determined by Mann–Whitney and Bonferroni correction p < 0.0125.
Nearly 30-90% of the pharmaceuticals we digest are excreted . . . → Read More: Your Happiness Kills Crustaceans... Read more »

  • July 19, 2010
  • 09:53 PM
  • 871 views

New Evidence for an Ocean on Mars?

by Ryan in The Martian Chronicles

There’s a new Nature Geoscience paper that has made a big splash in the Mars community, reviving interest in the possibility of a northern ocean. This news was making the rounds a couple weeks ago, but I decided to hold off because at last week’s Mars Journal Club we discussed the paper. The idea behind [...]... Read more »

  • July 19, 2010
  • 07:40 PM
  • 956 views

Time to Review Online: National Research Council Framework for Science Education

by Jack Hassard in The Art of Teaching Science

In a post that I wrote in February, I announced that the National Research Council had received funding from the Carnegie Foundation to develop a “conceptual framework for a new generation of science standards.”  The conceptual framework has been completed in a public draft that is now ready for review.  There is an online questionnaire [...]


Related posts:Students Lag in Science So Says the National Center for Education Statistics
New Generation of Science Standards: Part of the........ Read more »

  • July 19, 2010
  • 06:16 PM
  • 690 views

RNA Journal Club 6/24/10

by YPAA in You'd Prefer An Argonaute

Target RNA–Directed Trimming and Tailing of Small Silencing RNAs Stefan L. Ameres, Michael D. Horwich, Jui-Hung Hung, Jia Xu, Megha Ghildiyal, Zhiping Weng, Phillip D. Zamore Science 328: 1534–1539, 18 June 2010. DOI: 10.1126/science.1187058 This week’s thorough summary and analysis by Anonymous: Like you, Drosophila siRNAs’d prefer an Argonaute; in fact their Argonaute of choice [...]... Read more »

Ameres SL, Horwich MD, Hung JH, Xu J, Ghildiyal M, Weng Z, & Zamore PD. (2010) Target RNA-directed trimming and tailing of small silencing RNAs. Science, 328(5985), 1534-9. PMID: 20558712  

  • July 19, 2010
  • 05:16 PM
  • 481 views

Far out is not as far out as you think

by Carl in The motor chauvinist

Proprioception is the sense of where your body is in space. It is one of several ways the brain uses sensory information to figure out where your limbs and the rest of you are, along with vision and the semicircular ear canals of the vestibular system (though these are more important in balance). Proprioception is defined as information from the lengths of muscles, the location of joints and receptors in the skin that tell us how much we have stretched it.How, if at all, does the accuracy and pr........ Read more »

  • July 19, 2010
  • 04:13 PM
  • 1,032 views

[Direct Connection] Sweet and Sour: Glucose-6-Phosphate, Anoxia, and Enzyme Regulation

by Alejandro Montenegro-Montero in MolBio Research Highlights

The “Direct Connection” section of MolBio Research Highlights includes blog posts discussing primary research articles in the field, but the interesting thing about it is that these posts are written by the authors themselves. This allows them to discuss the background, results and implications of their work with a wider audience and in a more relaxed format. Further, as it provides a direct link... Read more »

  • July 19, 2010
  • 04:03 PM
  • 763 views

Prehistoric “bear-dog” Amphicyon was built like a “bear-lion”

by Laelaps in Laelaps

In surveying the diversity of living organisms, the 20th century evolutionary theorist Theodosius Dobzhansky did not see "a formless mass of randomly combining genes and traits." Instead he perceived pockets of discontinuity organized around available ecological niches - clusters of occupied "adaptive peaks" separated by rifts and valleys representing vacant spots in the natural world. [...]... Read more »

Christine Argot. (2010) Morphofunctional analysis of the postcranium of Amphicyon major (Mammalia, Carnivora, Amphicyonidae) from the Miocene of Sansan(Gers, France) compared to three extant carnivores: Ursus arctos, Panthera leo, and Canis lupus. Geodivertistas, 32(1), 65-106. info:/

  • July 19, 2010
  • 02:29 PM
  • 569 views

Bigfoot

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

Homo sapiens are dominating an increasing share of the mainland United States. Cities, towns, roads and other human land uses already shape about one-third of the landmass in the Lower 48 states, concludes a new analysis. By 2030, we could add a new “human footprint” the size of Indiana.
That forecast comes from a new […] Read More »... Read more »

  • July 19, 2010
  • 12:19 PM
  • 1,093 views

This Week in the Universe: July 13th – July 19th

by S.C. Kavassalis in The Language of Bad Physics

What have people been talking about this week in high energy physics, astrophysics, gravitation, general relativity and quantum gravity?... Read more »

F. Courbin, M. Tewes, S. G. Djorgovski, D. Sluse, A. Mahabal, F. Rerat, & G. Meylan. (2010) First case of strong gravitational lensing by a QSO : SDSS J0013 1523 at z . Astronomy . arXiv: 1002.4991v2

Daniel T. Cumberbatch, Joyce. A. Guzik, Joseph Silk, L. Scott Watson, & Stephen M. West. (2010) Light WIMPs in the Sun: Constraints from Helioseismology. arXiv. arXiv: 1005.5102v1

Eugenio Bianchi, & Carlo Rovelli. (2010) Why all these prejudices against a constant?. arXiv. arXiv: 1002.3966v3

Attila Meszaros, Lajos G. Balazs, Zsolt Bagoly, & Peter Veres. (2010) Impact on cosmology of the celestial anisotropy of the short gamma-ray bursts. Baltic Astronomy, Vol.18, 293-296 (2009). arXiv: 1005.1558v1

Chris Clarkson, & Roy Maartens. (2010) Inhomogeneity and the foundations of concordance cosmology. Class. Quantum Grav. 27 124008 (2010). arXiv: 1005.2165v2

Mosconi, M., Fujii, K., Mengoni, A., Domingo-Pardo, C., Käppeler, F., Abbondanno, U., Aerts, G., Álvarez-Pol, H., Alvarez-Velarde, F., Andriamonje, S.... (2010) Neutron physics of the Re/Os clock. I. Measurement of the (n,γ) cross sections of ^{186,187,188}Os at the CERN n_TOF facility. Physical Review C, 82(1). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.82.015802  

Nikodem J. Poplawski. (2010) Cosmology with torsion - an alternative to cosmic inflation. arXiv. arXiv: 1007.0587v1

Petr Horava, & Charles M. Melby-Thompson. (2010) General Covariance in Quantum Gravity at a Lifshitz Point. arXiv. arXiv: 1007.2410v1

Samuel E. Gralla, & Robert M. Wald. (2009) Derivation of Gravitational Self-Force. arXiv. arXiv: 0907.0414v1

J. Ambjorn, A. Goerlich, J. Jurkiewicz, & R. Loll. (2010) CDT---an Entropic Theory of Quantum Gravity. arXiv. arXiv: 1007.2560v1

  • July 19, 2010
  • 12:08 PM
  • 470 views

Breaking up before you know it

by eHarmony Labs in eHarmony Labs Blog

Can a word test tell you how you feel about your relationship? Read more.... Read more »

  • July 19, 2010
  • 12:04 PM
  • 1,487 views

PI3-kinase (PI3K): a hot topic in cancer research

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

Recently at a couple of scientific cancer meetings, American Urology Association (AUA) and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), Frank McCormick described a fascinating talk about how a wac-a-mole approach to figuring out how the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3-kinase or PI3K)...... Read more »

O'Brien, C., Wallin, J., Sampath, D., GuhaThakurta, D., Savage, H., Punnoose, E., Guan, J., Berry, L., Prior, W., Amler, L.... (2010) Predictive Biomarkers of Sensitivity to the Phosphatidylinositol 3' Kinase Inhibitor GDC-0941 in Breast Cancer Preclinical Models. Clinical Cancer Research, 16(14), 3670-3683. DOI: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-09-2828  

Turke, A., & Engelman, J. (2010) PIKing the Right Patient. Clinical Cancer Research, 16(14), 3523-3525. DOI: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-10-1201  

Miron, A., Varadi, M., Carrasco, D., Li, H., Luongo, L., Kim, H., Park, S., Cho, E., Lewis, G., Kehoe, S.... (2010) PIK3CA Mutations in In situ and Invasive Breast Carcinomas. Cancer Research, 70(14), 5674-5678. DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-08-2660  

  • July 19, 2010
  • 10:00 AM
  • 845 views

Y Chromosome II: What Is Even On It?

by Kele in Kele's Science Blog

Last time, we discussed a brief historical account of the Y chromosome research-wise. Initially up to 17 traits were attributed to the chromosome but Stern and later Ohno argued that it was instead largely devoid of gene content. While they were mostly right, and we will see why, that view is now a bit simplistic [...]... Read more »

Mark T. Ross, Darren V. Grafham, Alison J. Coffey, Steven Scherer, Stephan Beck1, Jane Rogers1, & David R. Bentley. (2005) The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome. Nature, 325-337. info:/10.1038/nature03440

Skaletsky H, Kuroda-Kawaguchi T, Minx PJ, Cordum HS, Hillier L, Brown LG, Repping S, Pyntikova T, Ali J, Bieri T.... (2003) The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome is a mosaic of discrete sequence classes. Nature, 423(6942), 825-37. PMID: 12815422  

  • July 19, 2010
  • 09:32 AM
  • 810 views

Measuring Synchrony - pt 1 of ??

by Brandon Goodell in Bored Lunatic

This is the first in a multi-part series analyzing the paper linked below.  The paper uses several measures of synchrony and tests them against some real-world data to compare their performance.  Today I will be talking about the frequency-coherence measure of synchrony.

I really love being a scientist.  The coolest bit about research, as far as I can tell, is that it's hard.  You are exploring the unknown.  This paper is exploring the unknown - in the past two decade,........ Read more »

  • July 19, 2010
  • 09:19 AM
  • 2,156 views

DMS(P): the amazing story of a pervasive indicator molecule in the marine food web

by Hannah Waters in Culturing Science – biology as relevant to us earthly beings

Dimethylsulfide.  Does that word mean anything to you?  “Why yes,” you organic chemistry nerds may say, “It clearly is a molecule of sulfur with two methyl groups attached.”  That’s as far as I could have gotten – until this past week, when I inundated myself with information on dimethylsulfide (DMS) due to a paper published [...]... Read more »

G. V. Wolfe, M. Steinke, & G. O. Kirst. (1997) Grazing-activated chemical defence in a unicellular marine alga. Nature, 894-897. info:/

  • July 19, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 983 views

We Believe Because We Evolved That Way part one

by Lorimer Moseley in BodyInMind

Why we have a placebo effect – Part I By Peter Blanch For a long time now, I have stood with my feet precariously placed on two icebergs that sometimes slowly drift apart and sometimes drift back together again (obviously increasing and decreasing my sensation of precariousness).  The first iceberg is where I started as [...]... Read more »

Watts, G. (2001) The power of nothing . New Scientist . info:/

  • July 19, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 787 views

The continued increase in human longevity

by EcoPhysioMichelle in C6-H12-O6 (old)

I have a raging science crush on Tom Kirkwood, the director of the Institute for Ageing and Health at Newcastle University. I was lucky enough to read one of his manuscripts in the review stage several years ago, and ever since then I’ve been absolutely hooked on his work on human aging. In undergrad I [...]... Read more »

Kirkwood, T. (2008) A systematic look at an old problem. Nature, 451(7179), 644-647. DOI: 10.1038/451644a  

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