Post List

  • November 5, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,692 views

Imaging Challenges in Bariatric Surgery

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

With the increased use of bariatric surgery as a treatment for severe obesity, radiology departments are facing unique challenges in providing imaging services for bariatric patients.
These challenges range from technical and staffing requirements to the interpretation of challenging post-surgical images.
A comprehensive review of these radiological challenges is now published by Shah and colleagues from the [...]... Read more »

  • November 5, 2010
  • 07:05 AM
  • 1,101 views

What is mental illness?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Illness is like the street you've driven down your whole life. So familiar you've never bothered to look around. We've all experienced illness, either first-hand or via someone we know, but rarely do we stop to wonder what it really is.

You might say it's when something mental or physical isn't working as it should be. But then who is to say how things should be working? This is easier to answer in relation to physical health, but still tricky. Pain, a loss of ability, a shortening of life expe........ Read more »

Stein, D., Phillips, K., Bolton, D., Fulford, K., Sadler, J., & Kendler, K. (2010) What is a mental/psychiatric disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V. Psychological Medicine, 40(11), 1759-1765. DOI: 10.1017/S0033291709992261  

  • November 5, 2010
  • 07:05 AM
  • 1,020 views

Research Domain Criteria for Classifying Mental Disorders

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

"The more a delusion is investigated, the more understandable and less bizarre it becomes, often interwoven with the very individual patterns of experiencing relationships, adversities and suffering, and finally, for every delusional content, as bizarre and remote as it may appear, there may be a cultural niche, in which the same content may be considered legitimate and reasonable."-Pfeifer (1999), Demonic Attributions in Nondelusional Disorders.What is psychopathology? According to Wikipedi........ Read more »

Sanislow CA, Pine DS, Quinn KJ, Kozak MJ, Garvey MA, Heinssen RK, Wang PS, & Cuthbert BN. (2010) Developing constructs for psychopathology research: Research domain criteria. Journal of abnormal psychology. PMID: 20939653  

  • November 5, 2010
  • 06:38 AM
  • 639 views

Victorian Psychology: Was It So Different From Modern Psychology?

by John Wayland in The Darwin Tribune

Psychology is sometimes only thought of as occuring in the 20th century. Indeed, most of Psychology has "happened" in the 20th Century. Freud, Skinner, Bowlby, the Cognitive Revolution, Neuropsychology are just a tiny fraction of who and what happened in the 20th century. Of course, students schooled in the history of psychology will know of it's early founding fathers, Wundt, James and possibly Darwin to name a few. But like many sciences, psychology owes its existence to the scientific en........ Read more »

Barton, R. (2002) Victorian psychology and British culture 1850-1880. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, 38(4), 411-412. DOI: 10.1002/jhbs.10039  

Vrettos, A. (2005) Victorian Psychology. A Companion to the Victorian Novel. info:/10.1111/b.9781405132916.2005.00006.x

  • November 5, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 978 views

Violent video games cause an increase in aggression long after the game has been turned off

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From Social Psychological and Personality Science In America this week the US Supreme Court has been hearing a case about the banning of violent video games. For many, this issue has been a concern for a long time in relation to children’s use and the impact of the exposure to their violence. Until now research [...]... Read more »

  • November 5, 2010
  • 04:45 AM
  • 818 views

Bionic Eye Lets Blind See

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

No, really. Read all about it in a remarkable (if awkwardly named) new paper from German team Zrenner et al, Subretinal electronic chips allow blind patients to read letters and combine them to words.The device acts as an artificial retina. It's a tiny 3 x 3.1 mm panel (about ■ that size) containing an array of 1,500 individual light-sensitive microphotodiodes (38 x 40).Each sensor converts incoming light into an electrical current - the brighter, the stronger - and outputs it through a tiny e........ Read more »

Eberhart Zrenner, et al. (2010) Subretinal electronic chips allow blind patients to read letters and combine them to words. Proc. R. Soc. B. info:/10.1098/rspb.2010.1747

  • November 5, 2010
  • 03:26 AM
  • 729 views

Review: "Copying and Artistic Behaviors"

by Neil Cohn in The Visual Linguist

Smith argues that the negative views on "copying" demonstrated by art educators since the 50s is misplaced in some contexts. She claims that some forms of copying are good, and the relative value of copying is based on three factors: need, model, and process. She examines varying fields through use of a corpus of comics produced by American children, noting that themes and genres are copied greatly. She didn't find that the children copied the drawing style as much. My curiosity is whether this ........ Read more »

  • November 5, 2010
  • 01:13 AM
  • 765 views

AVPR1A: Music in your Genes?

by Princess Ojiaku in Science with Moxie

I was totally going to save this Tegan & Sara Tiësto trance song for another post about "feeling the beat" because I thought that a dance song with a chorus about feeling things in your bones would go nicely with a paper about the neuroscience of rhythm and beat perception.But then I thought that old familiar feeling of having something "in your bones" seemed to go better with a post about that seemingly innate quality that musicians seem to have that enables and even compels them to be cre........ Read more »

Ukkola LT, Onkamo P, Raijas P, Karma K, & Järvelä I. (2009) Musical aptitude is associated with AVPR1A-haplotypes. PloS one, 4(5). PMID: 19461995  

  • November 5, 2010
  • 01:10 AM
  • 1,028 views

Friday Weird Science: Does Your Aunt Only Visit at the Dark of the Moon?

by Scicurious in Neurotic Physiology

Sci will admit that I often have a hard time with euphemisms. Particularly euphemisms about That Time of the Month. Your period. Your menstrual cycle. Your…red devil? Anyway, I never get the euphemisms. I don’t know why, but when people say things like “my aunt came to visit while I was wearing white pants!”, my [...]... Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 11:25 PM
  • 625 views

Neury Thursday: Why the Locals Spend More Time at the Bar in the Winter

by Allison in Dormivigilia

A study in today's Journal of Neuroscience found seasonal rhythms of dopamine kinetics, with kinetics being greatest during the fall and winter. This may be linked to seasonal rhythms of melatonin. Synergistic dopamine and melatonin actions have previously been linked to the etiology of neuropsychiatric and substance abuse disorders.... Read more »

Daniel P. Eisenberg, Philip D. Kohn, Erica B. Baller, Joel A. Bronstein, Joseph C. Masdeu, and Karen F. Berman. (2010) Seasonal Effects on Human Striatal Presynaptic Dopamine Synthesis. Journal of Neuroscience, 30(44). info:/

  • November 4, 2010
  • 10:53 PM
  • 740 views

Are Dolphins Trying to Communicate Across the Species Barrier?

by David Berreby in Mind Matters


Every time I see a row of seaside lampposts, each with a single seagull perched on it, I wonder: Do those birds think we built the highway system for them? I suspect the answer's yes. Each species of animal (like people, most of the time) seems to see the world as if it were made for them alone. Other species are mere objects: this one would be good for lunch, that one's an information source (think canary in the coal mine), these others are just obstacles in our way (think geese in the........ Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 09:24 PM
  • 932 views

Henodus, filter-feeding Triassic marine reptile [Tetrapod Zoology]

by Darren Naish none@example.com in Food Matters



Long-time readers will know that I've been planning to cover placodonts - a group of marine, armour-plated Triassic sauropterygian reptiles - for a long, long time. Still haven't gotten round to it (though there is this one picture). But here's something, at least: a piece of text on the weird, fascinating German placodont Henodus. The text is a (slightly modified) excerpt from Naish (2004); most of the discussion on possible feeding behaviour is based on Rieppel's (2002) conclusions.

Read t........ Read more »

Rieppel, O. (2002) Feeding mechanisms in Triassic stem-group sauropterygians: the anatomy of a successful invasion of Mesozoic seas. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 33-63. info:/

  • November 4, 2010
  • 09:15 PM
  • 566 views

Introducing new vaccines into poor African nations

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

The GAVI alliance (used to be called the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations) was founded in 2000 in order to help vaccinate children in poor nations. GAVI funds vaccines in any nation with a GNI per capita of less than $1,000. Glatman-Freedman et al. (published November 2010) investigated the factors involved in successful introduction of the Hib (Haemophilus influenza) and HepB (Hepatitis B) vaccines into poor nations. The Hib and HepB vaccines are expensive. The basic battery of va........ Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 09:10 PM
  • 749 views

Henodus, filter-feeding Triassic marine reptile

by Darren Naish in Tetrapod Zoology



Long-time readers will know that I've been planning to cover placodonts - a group of marine, armour-plated Triassic sauropterygian reptiles - for a long, long time. Still haven't gotten round to it (though there is this one picture). But here's something, at least: a piece of text on the weird, fascinating German placodont Henodus. The text is a (slightly modified) excerpt from Naish (2004); most of the discussion on possible feeding behaviour is based on Rieppel's (2002) conclusions.

Read t........ Read more »

Rieppel, O. (2002) Feeding mechanisms in Triassic stem-group sauropterygians: the anatomy of a successful invasion of Mesozoic seas. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 33-63. info:/

  • November 4, 2010
  • 07:00 PM
  • 1,319 views

Supply Chain Risk, Vulnerability and Mitigation in Indonesia

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

Indonesia. A logistical challenge for any supply chain, if not a logistical nightmare, and thus prone to supply chain disruptions. One would think that supply chain risk management would find fertile soil here, but does it? » Read more » » »
... Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 06:43 PM
  • 752 views

Genetically Engineered Autumn

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

It’s one of those idyllic Fall scenes: Fluttering leaves touching down on a swirling river and lining the bottom of a quiet pool. But what if those leaves come from genetically modified (GM) trees? Could they alter the bugs, bacteria and other aquatic critters that live off decaying litter? To find out, an international team […] Read More »... Read more »

Axelsson, E., Hjältén, J., LeRoy, C., Julkunen-Tiitto, R., Wennström, A., & Pilate, G. (2010) Can Leaf Litter from Genetically Modified Trees Affect Aquatic Ecosystems?. Ecosystems, 13(7), 1049-1059. DOI: 10.1007/s10021-010-9373-y  

  • November 4, 2010
  • 06:31 PM
  • 872 views

Naked Chicks

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

Penguin researchers are puzzling over a disorder that leaves young penguins featherless and has shown up in colonies in South Africa and Argentina. The rare illness appears to slow growth, and may be killing some of the birds.
Researchers first noted nude African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) chicks in a South African rehabilitation center run by […] Read More »... Read more »

Olivia J. Kane, Jeffrey R. Smith, P. Dee Boersma, Nola J. Parsons, Venessa Strauss, Pablo Garcia-Borboroglu and Cecilia Villanueva. (2010) Feather-Loss Disorder in African and Magellanic Penguins . Waterbirds. DOI: 10.1675/063.033.0321  

  • November 4, 2010
  • 06:28 PM
  • 1,119 views

Why religious Austrians have more children

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

On average, the more religious you are, the more kids you'll have. It's a widespread phenomenon, seen across pretty much all of the modern world.

The problem is, no-one really knows why this happens.

It could be something about religious beliefs. Maybe they make you more attractive to potential mates, or maybe they drive you to have more kids once you have found your mate.

Or maybe they encourage traditional, rather than modern, approaches to relationships. The traditional role for women is t........ Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 03:21 PM
  • 829 views

First members of the ATLAS of lenses

by Emma in we are all in the gutter

Its been a good week for the Herschel-ATLAS survey that I work on – last Friday we released our first set of data to the public and this Friday we’re publishing some exciting results, led by Mattia Negrello from the Open University, on a new way to find cosmic lenses. Gravitational lensing occurs when light [...]... Read more »

Negrello, M., Hopwood, R., De Zotti, G., Cooray, A., Verma, A., Bock, J., Frayer, D., Gurwell, M., Omont, A., Neri, R.... (2010) The Detection of a Population of Submillimeter-Bright, Strongly Lensed Galaxies. Science, 330(6005), 800-804. DOI: 10.1126/science.1193420  

  • November 4, 2010
  • 03:06 PM
  • 1,077 views

Stress: Does Gender Matter?

by A. Goldstein in WiSci

According to the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, 40 million Americans suffer from anxiety disorders—over twice the number of people who suffer from alcoholism,1 and nearly three times the number who suffer from depression.2 Of these 40 million people, two-thirds are female. While culture and environment might play contributing roles, science suggests that women may [...]... Read more »

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