Post List

  • August 3, 2010
  • 03:22 PM
  • 846 views

ICN2010: One of the genetic roots of language points to self-learning in fruit flies

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

In 2001, an article was published in the journal Nature that a mutation in the forkhead-domain gene FOXP2 is involved in a hereditary speech and language disorder in a family in Great Britain. Today, many refer to FOXP2 colloquially as a 'language' gene and accumulating evidence suggests that FOXP2 is involved in language-like behavior in other animals, most prominently in song-learning in birds. Language as well as song learning in birds is an operant learning process, i.e., the birds........ Read more »

  • August 3, 2010
  • 02:25 PM
  • 833 views

Why are there more Christian congregations where there is more crime?

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

Take a middle-American US city – a fairly typical city with the usual mix of rich and poor, downtown and suburban, black and white. Indianapolis, let’s say. Which areas do you think would have the highest levels of crime?

Well, the poor areas of course. No surprises there. Downtown areas and those area with low population density are also at risk – probably a result of increased opportunities. Racially mixed areas have higher level of theft and burglary, although not violent crime. And t........ Read more »

  • August 3, 2010
  • 11:55 AM
  • 762 views

Communicating environmental realities: framing and fiction

by Jeremy in Voltage Gate

I finally found the time yesterday evening to read through a few of the papers from the latest Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, which is focused on science/environmental communication this time around. The majority of the articles are driven by Nisbet’s ideas about framing in general, but I don’t really want to dive back [...]... Read more »

Groffman, P., Stylinski, C., Nisbet, M., Duarte, C., Jordan, R., Burgin, A., Previtali, M., & Coloso, J. (2010) Restarting the conversation: challenges at the interface between ecology and society. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 8(6), 284-291. DOI: 10.1890/090160  

Nisbet, M., Hixon, M., Moore, K., & Nelson, M. (2010) Four cultures: new synergies for engaging society on climate change. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 8(6), 329-331. DOI: 10.1890/1540-9295-8.6.329  

  • August 3, 2010
  • 10:16 AM
  • 690 views

The need for geophysical conservation

by Uncharted Atolls in Uncharted Atolls

How should we go about managing the conservation of biodiversity in the face of a changing climate?  Species by species?  Seems tedious.  And expensive to carry to completion.  Wouldn’t it be easier if we could determine what factors contribute to … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 3, 2010
  • 09:05 AM
  • 1,551 views

Double the mutualists, double the fun?

by Jeremy Yoder in Denim and Tweed

For all living things, information is critical to survival. Where's the best food source? Is there a predator nearby? Will this be a good place to build a nest? It probably shouldn't be surprising, then, that lots of animals do what humans do when faced with a host of hard-to-answer questions—they take their cues from their neighbors.

Red-backed shrikes place their nesting sites near where other shrike species have set up territories. Many bird species recognize each other's predator alarm ca........ Read more »

  • August 3, 2010
  • 08:12 AM
  • 1,013 views

Preserving endangered species – of gut microbes

by Grant Jacobs in Code for life






A recent paper argues for the need to preserve the gut microbes found in ancient rural populations.
We talk about preserving rare species, sometimes arguing that they might have medicinal value.

Some species produce different types of venom, that when applied properly can have medicinal uses.
Certain plants have toxins that they use as part of a defences [...]... Read more »

De Filippo, C., Cavalieri, D., Di Paola, M., Ramazzotti, M., Poullet, J., Massart, S., Collini, S., Pieraccini, G., & Lionetti, P. (2010) Impact of diet in shaping gut microbiota revealed by a comparative study in children from Europe and rural Africa. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1005963107  

  • August 3, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,366 views

Durability Of Bariatric Surgery

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

For most patients with severe obesity, the decision to undergo bariatric surgery is one of the most important decisions they will make in their lifetime.
But once they have decided to go down this route, several important issues need to be considered, not least the choice of operation.
Apart from the surgical risk (complications at the time [...]... Read more »

Shi X, Karmali S, Sharma AM, & Birch DW. (2010) A review of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. Obesity surgery, 20(8), 1171-7. PMID: 20379795  

Lanthaler M, Aigner F, Kinzl J, Sieb M, Cakar-Beck F, & Nehoda H. (2010) Long-term results and complications following adjustable gastric banding. Obesity surgery, 20(8), 1078-85. PMID: 20496124  

  • August 3, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,334 views

Is CRPS an auto-immune disease

by Lorimer Moseley in BodyInMind

Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Andreas Goebel on the results of his latest clinical trial .Just imagine the causes of some chronic pains are completely different from what you had thought. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is a severe pain which persists after limb trauma. You are unlucky if you develop this nasty condition, [...]... Read more »

[1] Goebel A, Baranowski A, Maurer K, Ghiai A, McCabe C, & Ambler G. (2010) Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment of the complex regional pain syndrome: a randomized trial. Annals of internal medicine, 152(3), 152-8. PMID: 20124231  

  • August 3, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 404 views

Establishment and Importance of Gut Microbe Ecology

by Michael Long in Phased

Paolo Lionetti (University of Florence, Italy) and coworkers' discovery that diet is the predominant factor in gut microbial ecology has implications for the long-term health, resiliency, and adaptive potential of modern civilization. This news feature was written on August 3, 2010.... Read more »

De Filippo, C., Cavalieri, D., Di Paola, M., Ramazzotti, M., Poullet, J. B., Massart, S., Collini, S., Pieraccini, G., & Lionetti, P. (2010) Impact of diet in shaping gut microbiota revealed by a comparative study in children from Europe and rural Africa. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1005963107  

  • August 3, 2010
  • 06:14 AM
  • 917 views

Lamprey immunity, again

by iayork in Mystery Rays from Outer Space

From A History of British Fish (William Yarrell, 1835) I’ve talked about lamprey immune systems several times (here, here, and here). I find them fascinating because it shows both how our own immune system developed, and also shows alternate routes that can lead to a pretty good, but very different, immune system. Quick background: In [...]... Read more »

Herrin, B., & Cooper, M. (2010) Alternative Adaptive Immunity in Jawless Vertebrates. The Journal of Immunology, 185(3), 1367-1374. DOI: 10.4049/jimmunol.0903128  

  • August 3, 2010
  • 05:45 AM
  • 1,524 views

Mapping ‘the other’ malaria

by Wellcome Trust in Wellcome Trust Blog

A new map of the global distribution of malaria suggests that Plasmodium vivax malaria has a more serious impact than is commonly believed. Four species of the plasmodium parasite are known to commonly cause malaria in humans: P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. ovale, and P. vivax. Of these, P. falciparum is the most deadly and [...]... Read more »

Guerra, C., Howes, R., Patil, A., Gething, P., Van Boeckel, T., Temperley, W., Kabaria, C., Tatem, A., Manh, B., Elyazar, I.... (2010) The International Limits and Population at Risk of Plasmodium vivax Transmission in 2009. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 4(8). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000774  

  • August 3, 2010
  • 02:19 AM
  • 760 views

Old Corn

by teofilo in Gambler's House

One important line of evidence in understanding the climatic history of Chaco Canyon, a subject of considerable interest given the harsh aridity of the current climate and the incongruous grandeur of the archaeological remains, has been the study of packrat middens.  These are collections made by packrats of materials found near their nesting locations, which [...]... Read more »

Hall, Stephen A. (2010) Early maize pollen from Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, USA. Palynology, 34(1), 125-137. info:/10.1080/01916121003675746

  • August 3, 2010
  • 02:03 AM
  • 1,222 views

Why some people don’t like the humor of Monthy Python

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD

The neuroscience of two types of humor


Related posts:Were does Humor and Laughter Reside in the Brain?
Monthy Python on You Tube
Humor and Health
... Read more »

Samson, A., Hempelmann, C., Huber, O., & Zysset, S. (2009) Neural substrates of incongruity-resolution and nonsense humor. Neuropsychologia, 47(4), 1023-1033. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2008.10.028  

  • August 3, 2010
  • 12:18 AM
  • 694 views

by Ryan in The Martian Chronicles

The other day in Mars journal club, we took a look at a paper about the “fan” in Eberswalde crater. You may recognize this name: it is one of the four finalist landing sites for MSL. The site was chosen because at the western end of the crater, there is a feature that most Mars [...]... Read more »

  • August 2, 2010
  • 10:59 PM
  • 2,477 views

Sunday Protist – Nematode-hunting amoebae: Theratromyxa

by Psi Wavefunction in Skeptic Wonder

A couple posts ago we saw how ecological relationships may refuse to obey the laws of their kingdoms: protists can hunt crustaceans. Protists can also farm bacteria, animals can parasitise unicellular protists, plants can parasitise fungi, fungi can hunt animals, animals can steal plastids and photosynthesise, as well as steal algae for their embryos, fungi parasitise protists, and perhaps plants may even feast on the occasional bacterium or two (though that's yet to be confirmed). It seems neit........ Read more »

  • August 2, 2010
  • 09:29 PM
  • 1,082 views

Robert M. Chanock, MD, 1924-2010

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

From the Washington Post:
Dr. ROBERT M. CHANOCK (Age 86) On July 30, 2010 of Bethesda, MD. He was a resident in the Washington area for over 50 years, a distinguished scientist at the National Institute of Health. He received many awards and was a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received his undergrad [...]... Read more »

  • August 2, 2010
  • 08:17 PM
  • 873 views

The M2 channel controversy rides again

by Michael Clarkson in Conformational Flux

Most people never learn about an actual scientific controversy. Almost every "controversy" that bubbles into the public eye is manufactured, often reflecting social or ethical differences rather than genuine disagreements between experts about how different models fit to reality. Actual scientific controversies tend to be highly technical, and often concern points that lay people find to be esoteric. That doesn't mean that the issues involved aren't important, or that they're even difficult to u........ Read more »

  • August 2, 2010
  • 07:31 PM
  • 4,211 views

The Evolution of the Polydnavirus: How Wasps Began Using Viruses to Engineer Their Hosts

by Joe Ballenger in Biofortified

In Polydnaviruses, Nature’s GMOs, I explained how polydnaviruses disabled host immune defenses through genetic modification. A post after that, I discussed how polydnaviruses use modified insect proteins to interfere with these systems. So if you’re a biologically-minded person, there’s one question you should be asking yourself. It’s a rather important question because it’s answer could shed light on what makes these wasps species-specific, and this is essential f........ Read more »

Webb, B., Fisher, T., & Nusawardani, T. (2009) The Natural Genetic Engineering of Polydnaviruses. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1178(1), 146-156. DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.05023.x  

Wu, G., Jun, S., Sims, G., & Kim, S. (2009) Whole-proteome phylogeny of large dsDNA virus families by an alignment-free method. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106(31), 12826-12831. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0905115106  

  • August 2, 2010
  • 07:31 PM
  • 1,909 views

Evolution of the Polydnavirus: How Wasps Began Using Viruses to Engineer Their Hosts

by Joe Ballenger in Biofortified

In Polydnaviruses, Nature’s GMOs, I explained how polydnaviruses disabled host immune defenses through genetic modification. A post after that, I discussed how polydnaviruses use modified insect proteins to interfere with these systems. So if you’re a biologically-minded person, there’s one question you should be asking yourself. It’s a rather important question because it’s answer could shed light on what makes these wasps species-specific, and this is essential f........ Read more »

Webb, B., Fisher, T., & Nusawardani, T. (2009) The Natural Genetic Engineering of Polydnaviruses. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1178(1), 146-156. DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.05023.x  

Wu, G., Jun, S., Sims, G., & Kim, S. (2009) Whole-proteome phylogeny of large dsDNA virus families by an alignment-free method. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106(31), 12826-12831. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0905115106  

  • August 2, 2010
  • 05:17 PM
  • 901 views

Do you know what you like?

by Daniel Simons in The Invisible Gorilla

Do you know what you like? (Don't) think again. The phenomenon of choice blindness shows the split between our intuitive preferences and our explanations of them. A new paper by Hall & Johansson extend the phenomenon to food preferences.... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.