Post List

  • August 20, 2010
  • 10:30 PM
  • 610 views

Rubella – Discount babies! 50% off! Cataracts included!

by thomastu in Disease Prone

People shouting loudly and angrily against childhood vaccination seem to either evil or ignorant of what the world was like before vaccines were readily available. And Hanlon’s razor tells us “Never attribute to malice what can be blamed on ignorance”. So, as my civic duty, I am starting a series on vaccine preventatble diseases. First [...]... Read more »

  • August 20, 2010
  • 09:34 PM
  • 1,239 views

Evolving Pesticide Resistance

by Matthew DiLeo in The Scientist Gardener

It's been estimated that genetic resistance to every pesticide that will ever be invented already exists in some microbe in some field, somewhere in the world. If you invent an incredible new spray that kills, say, Phytophthora infestans, you'd know that somewhere in the world there is a little P. infestans mycelium or spore that is already resistant. If you start spraying thousands and thousands... Read more »

Zhu, Y., Chen, H., Fan, J., Wang, Y., Li, Y., Chen, J., Fan, J., Yang, S., Hu, L., Leung, H.... (2000) Genetic diversity and disease control in rice. Nature, 406(6797), 718-722. DOI: 10.1038/35021046  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 04:16 PM
  • 1,369 views

Conduction aphasia, speech repetition, and the left parietal lobe

by Greg Hickok in Talking Brains

Julius Fridriksson has been featured on this blog before and now his team has just published another noteworthy paper in J. Neuroscience. This paper sought to identify the neural correlate of repetition disorder in aphasia. Repetition deficits are characteristic of conduction aphasia although they are not exclusive to conduction aphasia nor is repetition the only deficit in conduction aphasia. Some historical background is useful, if for no other reason than most people get it wrong in one wa........ Read more »

Fridriksson J, Kjartansson O, Morgan PS, Hjaltason H, Magnusdottir S, Bonilha L, & Rorden C. (2010) Impaired speech repetition and left parietal lobe damage. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 30(33), 11057-61. PMID: 20720112  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 04:10 PM
  • 964 views

Genome-Scale Epigenetic Marker Detection Across Populations

by Michael Long in Phased

Lior Pachter (University of California at Berkeley, United States) and coworkers have developed MetMap software for uncovering epigenetic data hidden by standard MethylSeq analysis, which will advance our understanding of the role of epigenetics in human health and medicine. This news feature was written on August 20, 2010.... Read more »

Singer, M., Boffelli, D., Dhahbi, J., Schoenhuth, A., Schroth, G. P., Martin, D. I. K., & Pachter, L. (2010) MetMap Enables Genome-Scale Methyltyping for Determining Methylation States in Populations. PLoS Computational Biology, 6(8). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000888  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 03:00 PM
  • 561 views

Spindles are Important for a Good Night's Sleep

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Harvardian researchers have uncovered the secret to a sound night's sleep in a busy city. Sleep spindles. These spontaneous brain waves over protection from nighttime arousals induced by traffic and miscellaneous environmental noise... Read more »

Dang-Vu TT, McKinney SM, Buxton OM, Solet JM, & Ellenbogen JM. (2010) Spontaneous brain rhythms predict sleep stability in the face of noise. Current biology : CB, 20(15). PMID: 20692606  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 02:38 PM
  • 896 views

The Scientist and the Anarchist - Part III

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Deborah Blum at her website Speakeasy Science.When an estimated 1,400 match-girls went on strike in July, 1888 to protest for better working conditions, it started a fire that became known as New Unionism. Soon after came the London dock workers’ strike, and within twelve months the UK’s Trade Union Congress had increased its membership from 670,000 to 1,593,000. [1]For Thomas Henry Huxley and Peter Kropotkin these labor developments were ........ Read more »

Peter Kropotkin. (1902) Mutual Aide: A Factor of Evolution. New York: McClure, Philips . info:/

  • August 20, 2010
  • 02:38 PM
  • 731 views

The Scientist and the Anarchist - Part III

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Deborah Blum at her website Speakeasy Science.When an estimated 1,400 match-girls went on strike in July, 1888 to protest for better working conditions, it started a fire that became known as New Unionism. Soon after came the London dock workers’ strike, and within twelve months the UK’s Trade Union Congress had increased its membership from 670,000 to 1,593,000. [1]For Thomas Henry Huxley and Peter Kropotkin these labor developments were ........ Read more »

Peter Kropotkin. (1902) Mutual Aide: A Factor of Evolution. New York: McClure, Philips . info:/

  • August 20, 2010
  • 01:40 PM
  • 2,640 views

Cylons and Smelloscopes: False Positives and False Negatives in the Search for Extraterrestrial Life

by The Astronomist in The Astronomist.

Are there planets outside of our solar system? Is there life on other planets? Is life on other planets like life on Earth? These are questions that astronomers, astrobiologists, chemists, and geologists are trying to answer with current experiments. In order to answer these questions we must observe distant planets and we must determine what life on those planets may be like. Detecting extrasolar planets is tricky enough, but imaging what alien life is like may well be stranger than science fic........ Read more »

Beichman, C. A., Woolf, N. J., & Lindensmith, C. A. (1999) The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) : a NASA Origins Program to search for habitable planets. JPL publication. info:/

  • August 20, 2010
  • 12:53 PM
  • 723 views

Frogs, Big Mountains, and Speciation

by Michael Windelspecht in RicochetScience

The formation of new species is always a great way to discuss evolutionary change over time. Most textbooks do an adequate job of providing examples of how geographic isolation contributes to the the process of speciation. However, where many books are lacking is showing how the resulting species then adapt to their new environment following the establishment of the geographic barrier. If you are looking for an interesting way to show the relationship between geographic isolation, adaptation, an........ Read more »

Che, J., Zhou, W., Hu, J., Yan, F., Papenfuss, T., Wake, D., & Zhang, Y. (2010) From the Cover: Spiny frogs (Paini) illuminate the history of the Himalayan region and Southeast Asia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(31), 13765-13770. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1008415107  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 12:32 PM
  • 1,138 views

Study: In Communicating about Nano and GMOs, Do the Frames or the Facts Matter?

by Matthew C. Nisbet in Age of Engagement

When attempting to communicate effectively with the public about a science-related debate, which is more important, framing the message or conveying science-based facts about the topic?  A forthcoming study (Word) at the Journal of Communication by Northwestern University researchers James Druckman and Toby Bolsen sheds new light on this long standing question.
As I will be highlighting at this blog, previous research consistently finds that the public typically form opinions in the absence........ Read more »

  • August 20, 2010
  • 10:43 AM
  • 1,150 views

Healthy Lifestyle and Mortality Risk in Men

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

In 2001 I went to the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, Texas for an executive physical examination.  Although not for everyone, I had good experience and I’m a strong supporter of their research program.  I have participated in mail survey research studies since my physical examination.  One recent publication from the their Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study caught my eye.Epidemiological studies typically look for risk factors for a disease or death.  Fewer studies try to identify........ Read more »

Byun W, Sieverdes JC, Sui X, Hooker SP, Lee CD, Church TS, & Blair SN. (2010) Effect of Positive Health Factors and All-Cause Mortality in Men. Medicine and science in sports and exercise. PMID: 20142782  

King DE, Mainous AG 3rd, & Geesey ME. (2007) Turning back the clock: adopting a healthy lifestyle in middle age. The American journal of medicine, 120(7), 598-603. PMID: 17602933  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 10:33 AM
  • 1,296 views

Cocoa drink reduces DOMS. Really? Well, Maybe...

by mc in begin to dig (b2d)

What if cocoa in a drink of protein and carbs could mitigate DOMS - delayed onset muscle soreness? This is what researchers in a newly published Aug 2010 study have explored. And thank goodness, since most of us have struggled with DOMS at one time or another - new routine and next day or next few days our muscles pay for it. We walk like cowboys coming off a long jaunt in the saddle. Could ... Read more »

Karp JR, Johnston JD, Tecklenburg S, Mickleborough TD, Fly AD, & Stager JM. (2006) Chocolate milk as a post-exercise recovery aid. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism, 16(1), 78-91. PMID: 16676705  

Wiswedel, I., Hirsch, D., Kropf, S., Gruening, M., Pfister, E., Schewe, T., & Sies, H. (2004) Flavanol-rich cocoa drink lowers plasma F2-isoprostane concentrations in humans. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 37(3), 411-421. DOI: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2004.05.013  

Green MS, Corona BT, Doyle JA, & Ingalls CP. (2008) Carbohydrate-protein drinks do not enhance recovery from exercise-induced muscle injury. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism, 18(1), 1-18. PMID: 18272930  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 10:21 AM
  • 687 views

Prehistoric Poo Linked Dinosaurs to Snails

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

One of the many reasons I love paleontology is that every now and then I stumble across a paper on some aspect of ancient life I had never considered before. There is much more to the science than descriptions of new species, and one of the studies that most recently caught my eye carried the [...]... Read more »

  • August 20, 2010
  • 10:02 AM
  • 913 views

Schizophrenia, Genes and Environment

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

Schizophrenia is generally thought of as the "most genetic" of all psychiatric disorders and in the past 10 years there have been heroic efforts to find the genes responsible for it, with not much success so far.A new study reminds us that there's more to it than genes alone: Social Risk or Genetic Liability for Psychosis? The authors decided to look at adopted children, because this is one of the best ways of disentangling genes and environment.If you find that the children of people with schiz........ Read more »

  • August 20, 2010
  • 10:00 AM
  • 820 views

Exploring Information Interaction ‘Context’ with Tefko Saracevic at #IIIX2010

by Anatoliy Gruzd in Social Media Lab

I am writing from the ‘Information Interaction in Context Symposium‘ in New Brunswick (the one in New Jersey, not the one in Canada), the home of Rutgers University. Usually I would wait until a conference is over and the dust is settled before blogging about an event, but in this case I’ll make an exception. Specifically, I would like to share some of the highlights from the keynote speaker while it’s still fresh in my mind.... Read more »

Saracevic, T. (2010) The Notion of Context in "Information Interaction in Context.". Inivited keynote at the conference Information Interaction in Context. info:/

  • August 20, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,717 views

Do Environmental Toxins Promote Obesity?

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

Our environment is full of man-made chemicals, the biological actions of which we rarely fully understand.
There is now considerable data showing that some of these chemicals may well have biological effects that can potentially change metabolism. These compounds are, therefore, sometimes referred to as “endocrine disrupting chemicals” (EDC) and can potentially promote weight gain and [...]... Read more »

  • August 20, 2010
  • 07:45 AM
  • 1,317 views

When to blame your parents, and for what

by Kevin Mitchell in Wiring the Brain

Studies linking some aspect of parental behaviour with some trait in their offspring are depressingly common in the sociological literature. Though these studies typically only report a correlation between parental behaviour and whatever the trait is in the offspring, the implication, and often the explicit conclusion, is that one causes the other. These kinds of stories get huge play in the popular press (and in the blogosphere), where the conclusion of a causative relationship is rarely chal........ Read more »

Evans, M., Kelley, J., Sikora, J., & Treiman, D. (2010) Family scholarly culture and educational success: Books and schooling in 27 nations. Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, 28(2), 171-197. DOI: 10.1016/j.rssm.2010.01.002  

Rice, F., Harold, G., Boivin, J., Hay, D., van den Bree, M., & Thapar, A. (2009) Disentangling prenatal and inherited influences in humans with an experimental design. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106(7), 2464-2467. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0808798106  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 07:41 AM
  • 780 views

The many (scientific) uses of penguin poop (Part III)

by Sam W in From C to Carnivore

How hard does a penguin push? Remember to read the newest and indeed first edition of the Carnal Carnival featuring many other stories about poop! I’ll admit, I didn’t get the idea to post about penguin poop from the cool and well popularised study on tracking them from space. I got it from a very [...]... Read more »

  • August 20, 2010
  • 06:56 AM
  • 1,054 views

It’s a Rich Man’s World-Or Is It?

by Isobel in Promega Connections

We all know that “Money Can’t Buy You Love” or make you happy. Now comes a piece of research suggesting that having money (or even just looking at money) can actually make normal everyday pleasures less enjoyable. Even worse, this bad feeling can’t be cured by having a piece of chocolate. In the study “Money [...]... Read more »

Quoidbach J, Dunn EW, Petrides KV, & Mikolajczak M. (2010) Money giveth, money taketh away: the dual effect of wealth on happiness. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS, 21(6), 759-63. PMID: 20483819  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 06:32 AM
  • 717 views

Superoxides eat your brain

by Becky in It Takes 30

But that’s a good thing.  Well, probably.  Autophagy — cellular-level self-eating — appears to be misregulated in many neurodegenerative diseases.  A new study from Junying Yuan’s group (Lipinski et al. 2010 Genome-wide analysis reveals mechanisms modulating autophagy in normal brain aging and in Alzheimer’s disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 107 14164-9 PMID: [...]... Read more »

Lipinski MM, Zheng B, Lu T, Yan Z, Py BF, Ng A, Xavier RJ, Li C, Yankner BA, Scherzer CR.... (2010) Genome-wide analysis reveals mechanisms modulating autophagy in normal brain aging and in Alzheimer's disease. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107(32), 14164-9. PMID: 20660724  

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