Post List

  • January 10, 2011
  • 10:00 AM
  • 1,457 views

Lemur Week: Ringtailed Lemurs Look Where You're Looking

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal

In honor of Science Online, which begins on Thursday night, I will be writing about lemurs this week. Why lemurs? Because on Friday morning, as a part of Science Online, I will be taking a tour of the Duke Lemur Center.

It is common among animals - especially primates - to orient their gaze preferentially towards other individuals, as well as to follow the gaze of others. Lots of attention has been paid to gaze-following, in part because the ability to recognize and orient to the behavior of ot........ Read more »

  • January 10, 2011
  • 09:56 AM
  • 1,725 views

Gabrielle Giffords' brain surgery: Decompressive hemicraniectomy

by Bradley Voytek in Oscillatory Thoughts

Description of Congresswoman Giffords' neurosurgery... Read more »

Voytek B, Secundo L, Bidet-Caulet A, Scabini D, Stiver SI, Gean AD, Manley GT, & Knight RT. (2010) Hemicraniectomy: a new model for human electrophysiology with high spatio-temporal resolution. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 22(11), 2491-502. PMID: 19925193  

  • January 10, 2011
  • 09:05 AM
  • 1,270 views

New advances in triple negative breast cancer

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

Phase 2 study showing the use of gemcitabine and carboplatin plus iniparib, as compared with gemcitabine and carboplatin alone, resulted in a significantly higher rate of response and increased the progression-free survival. Continue reading →... Read more »

O'Shaughnessy, J., Osborne, C., Pippen, J., Yoffe, M., Patt, D., Rocha, C., Koo, I., Sherman, B., & Bradley, C. (2011) Iniparib plus Chemotherapy in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1011418  

Carey, L., & Sharpless, N. (2011) PARP and Cancer — If It's Broke, Don't Fix It. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMe1012546  

  • January 10, 2011
  • 08:15 AM
  • 2,862 views

Delusions, odd and common: Living in the prodrome, part 2

by gregdowney in Neuroanthropology

Author Rachel Aviv talked at length with a number of young people who had been identified as being ‘prodromal’ for schizophrenia, experiencing periodic delusions and at risk of converting to full-blown schizophrenia, following some of the at-risk individuals for a year.  In December’s Harper’s, Aviv offered a sensitive, insightful account of their day-to-day struggles to maintain insight, recognizing which of their experiences are not real: Which way madness lies: Can psychosis be preve........ Read more »

Bauer, S., Schanda, H., Karakula, H., Olajossy-Hilkesberger, L., Rudaleviciene, P., Okribelashvili, N., Chaudhry, H., Idemudia, S., Gscheider, S., & Ritter, K. (2010) Culture and the prevalence of hallucinations in schizophrenia. Comprehensive Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2010.06.008  

Corcoran, C., Davidson, L., Sills-Shahar, R., Nickou, C., Malaspina, D., Miller, T., & McGlashan, T. (2003) A Qualitative Research Study of the Evolution of Symptoms in Individuals Identified as Prodromal to Psychosis. Psychiatric Quarterly, 74(4), 313-332. DOI: 10.1023/A:1026083309607  

Koenig HG. (2009) Research on religion, spirituality, and mental health: a review. Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie, 54(5), 283-91. PMID: 19497160  

Roth, T., Lubin, F., Sodhi, M., & Kleinman, J. (2009) Epigenetic mechanisms in schizophrenia. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - General Subjects, 1790(9), 869-877. DOI: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2009.06.009  

  • January 10, 2011
  • 08:15 AM
  • 1,912 views

Delusions, odd and common: Living in the prodrome, part 2

by Daniel Lende in Neuroanthropology PLoS

Author Rachel Aviv talked at length with a number of young people who had been identified as being ‘prodromal’ for schizophrenia, experiencing periodic delusions and at risk of converting to full-blown schizophrenia, following some of the at-risk individuals for a year.  In December’s Harper’s, Aviv offered a sensitive, insightful account of their day-to-day struggles to maintain insight, recognizing which of their experiences are not real: Which way madness lies: Can psychosis be preve........ Read more »

Bauer, S., Schanda, H., Karakula, H., Olajossy-Hilkesberger, L., Rudaleviciene, P., Okribelashvili, N., Chaudhry, H., Idemudia, S., Gscheider, S., & Ritter, K. (2010) Culture and the prevalence of hallucinations in schizophrenia. Comprehensive Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2010.06.008  

Corcoran, C., Davidson, L., Sills-Shahar, R., Nickou, C., Malaspina, D., Miller, T., & McGlashan, T. (2003) A Qualitative Research Study of the Evolution of Symptoms in Individuals Identified as Prodromal to Psychosis. Psychiatric Quarterly, 74(4), 313-332. DOI: 10.1023/A:1026083309607  

Koenig HG. (2009) Research on religion, spirituality, and mental health: a review. Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie, 54(5), 283-91. PMID: 19497160  

Roth, T., Lubin, F., Sodhi, M., & Kleinman, J. (2009) Epigenetic mechanisms in schizophrenia. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - General Subjects, 1790(9), 869-877. DOI: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2009.06.009  

  • January 10, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,614 views

Household Intervention Changes Behaviour But Not Body Weight

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

When it comes to weight management (especially in kids), the consensus appears to be that lifestyle changes are easier to implement and more effective when they target whole households.
But do household interventions really change behaviour?
This question was now addressed by Simone French and colleagues from the University of Minnesota in a paper just published online [...]... Read more »

French SA, Gerlach AF, Mitchell NR, Hannan PJ, & Welsh EM. (2011) Household Obesity Prevention: Take Action-a Group-Randomized Trial. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.). PMID: 21212771  

  • January 10, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 893 views

Comments on “Blackawton Bees”: Guest post by Adrian Horridge

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

Note: The following is a guest post by G. Adrian Horridge. Dr. Horridge is probably best known as co-author of the massive two volume book, Structure and Function in the Nervous System of Invertebrates, published in 1965.

Enthusiasm and activity in the young, and scientific investigation by experiment, not to mention the publicity, are all commendable. There are some irrelevant mentions of dogs, human puzzles and helping us to understand ourselves better, that add to the interest but not to the........ Read more »

Blackawton, P., Airzee, S., Allen, A., Baker, S., Berrow, A., Blair, C., Churchill, M., Coles, J., Cumming, R., Fraquelli, L.... (2010) Blackawton bees. Biology Letters. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.1056  

  • January 10, 2011
  • 07:47 AM
  • 1,214 views

The speed of cities

by Jason Collins in Evolving Economics

Over the weekend, I listened to a great Radiolab podcast in which Bob Levine was interviewed about the pace of walking in cities. Bob spoke about how people tend to walk faster in larger cities, with this relationship surprisingly consistent. Where does this walking pace comes from. As the host Jad asked, do we make [...]... Read more »

Bornstein, M., & Bornstein, H. (1976) The pace of life. Nature, 259(5544), 557-559. DOI: 10.1038/259557a0  

  • January 10, 2011
  • 07:03 AM
  • 1,089 views

News flash: Lawyers Under Stress are Critical, Cautious & Distant

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

And who isn’t? It isn’t really news that stress can bring out the “dark side” in each of us—but it is the topic of recent research. (Find the complete report on which this write-up is based here.) You have likely often seen the write-ups about “personality characteristics” of those in various professions. And it is often a [...]


No related posts.... Read more »

Daicoff, S. (1997) Lawyer, Know Thyself: A Review of Empirical Research on Attorney Attributes Bearing on Professionalism. American University Law Review, 1337. info:/

  • January 10, 2011
  • 07:00 AM
  • 600 views

January 10, 2011

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

My last blog post was about how the immune system gets rid of invaders, but this post is about a paper showing some fascinating results about immune cells actually helping an unwanted resident, a transformed cell. This paper provides a very cool addition to the idea that some cancers look like non-healing wounds. ... Read more »

  • January 10, 2011
  • 05:30 AM
  • 651 views

The cost of garbage

by Becky in It Takes 30

Misfolded proteins are bad news. Not only are they involved in a number of nasty diseases, they also place potentially severe constraints on evolution.  As we’ve discussed before, evolution depends on the ability to survive and function in the face of mutations.  A mutation that causes misfolding, so that instead of a nice functional protein [...]... Read more »

Geiler-Samerotte KA, Dion MF, Budnik BA, Wang SM, Hartl DL, & Drummond DA. (2010) Misfolded proteins impose a dosage-dependent fitness cost and trigger a cytosolic unfolded protein response in yeast. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 21187411  

  • January 10, 2011
  • 05:19 AM
  • 1,077 views

Ancestry in the Americas

by Razib Khan in Gene Expression

The populations of the African Diaspora have a particular interest in the new genomics, and its relationship to ancestry. Unlike other post-Columbian Diasporas they have sketchy, at best, knowledge of the regions from which their ancestors arrived. This probably explains the popularity of Roots and Henry Louis Gates Jr.’s various genealogical projects which have utilized [...]... Read more »

Stefflova K, Dulik MC, Barnholtz-Sloan JS, Pai AA, & Walker AH. (2011) Dissecting the Within-Africa Ancestry of Populations of African Descent in the Americas. PLoS ONE . info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0014495

  • January 10, 2011
  • 04:51 AM
  • 1,445 views

Three-year-olds show a bias for spotting snakes in a striking posture

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest



Have we evolved to detect this threat?
We humans seem to have an innate predisposition to fear dangerous animals and other hazards that would have imperilled our ancestors - a phenomenon called 'prepared learning'. For example, when researchers in the 1980s used loud noises to condition people to fear the sight of snakes and guns, they found that people acquired a fear of the snakes much more easily, even though the noises matched the sound made by guns. A new study has built on that classic w........ Read more »

  • January 10, 2011
  • 04:27 AM
  • 1,027 views

Life as a stegosaur: the SJG stegosaur special, part III

by Darren Naish in Tetrapod Zoology





Time to wrap up on the SJG special - make sure you see part I and part II first. Wow, I never thought I'd end up writing three long articles on this series of papers (hmm, a familiar theme). In the previous articles we looked at stegosaur systematics, and at Heinrich Mallison's work on the ranges of movement and posture of Kentrosaurus. This time round, we look at the papers that discuss preserved soft tissues, the possible role of the plates, and on feeding behaviour. Oh, and we finish up b........ Read more »

  • January 10, 2011
  • 04:13 AM
  • 1,196 views

Change blindness illusion

by Janet Kwasniak in Thoughts on thoughts


Jordan Suchow has some illustrations of an illusion (here) that accompany the paper whose citation is below. It an excellent demonstration of change blindness. Here is the abstract:
Loud bangs, bright flashes, and intense shocks capture attention, but other changes – even those of similar magnitude – can go unnoticed. Demonstrations of change blindness have shown [...]... Read more »

  • January 10, 2011
  • 03:29 AM
  • 1,502 views

Black holes are not fed by colliding galaxies after all

by Kelly Oakes in Basic Space

It’s not a question you’re likely to have ever considered, but the source of “food” for some of the most active black holes has been a longstanding line of inquiry for the astrophysics community. Many thought they had the answer … Continue reading →... Read more »

Cisternas, M., Jahnke, K., Inskip, K., Kartaltepe, J., Koekemoer, A., Lisker, T., Robaina, A., Scodeggio, M., Sheth, K., Trump, J.... (2011) THE BULK OF THE BLACK HOLE GROWTH SINCE z ~ 1 OCCURS IN A SECULAR UNIVERSE: NO MAJOR MERGER-AGN CONNECTION* . The Astrophysical Journal, 726(2), 57. DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/726/2/57  

  • January 10, 2011
  • 02:52 AM
  • 1,131 views

The psychology of parapsychology, or why good researchers publishing good articles in good journals can still get it totally wrong

by Tal Yarkoni in citation needed

Unless you’ve been pleasantly napping under a rock for the last couple of months, there’s a good chance you’ve heard about a forthcoming article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (JPSP) purporting to provide strong evidence for the existence of some ESP-like phenomenon. (If you’ve been napping, see here, here, here, here, here, [...]... Read more »

Bem, D. J. (2011) Feeling the Future: Experimental Evidence for Anomalous Retroactive Influences on Cognition and Affect. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. info:/

  • January 9, 2011
  • 10:02 PM
  • 794 views

It’s really all about the brain

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

Neuroscience is such a geeky area to study. And I have to say I didn’t really study the brain all that well in my undergraduate training all those years ago – but oh, how the worm has turned! It’s so exciting to see how basic science directly influences treatments that we can use for people … Read more... Read more »

  • January 9, 2011
  • 06:48 PM
  • 1,111 views

Psycasm - A window into your Genetics and Mate Preference?

by Rift in Psycasm


I have stumbled upon an interesting area of research. It seems that, like some other seemingly arbitrary measures (like digit ratios), that it has the capacity to have modest (if rough) predictive power. It also seems, at first glance, to border on the kooky side of science, and in parts reminds me of old arguments about racial intelligence and head-bumps, cranial capacity, and ol' fashioned ; (read more)

Source: Rift - Discipline: Psychology... Read more »

  • January 9, 2011
  • 04:46 PM
  • 951 views

A more prosaic explanation

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

The aftermath of some blogosphere activity about CDF possible finding at Tevatron left no possible satisfactory explanation beyond a massive octet of massive gluons that was already known in the literature and used by people at Fermilab. In the end we need some exceedingly massive gluons to explain this asymmetry. If you look around in [...]... Read more »

Marco Frasca. (2007) Infrared Gluon and Ghost Propagators. Phys.Lett.B670:73-77,2008. arXiv: 0709.2042v6

Marco Frasca. (2009) Mapping a Massless Scalar Field Theory on a Yang-Mills Theory: Classical Case. Mod. Phys. Lett. A 24, 2425-2432 (2009). arXiv: 0903.2357v4

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