Post List

  • February 17, 2011
  • 09:03 PM
  • 1,084 views

Possible Mechanical Forces Underlying Cancer Metastasis

by Michael Long in Phased

Mechanical forces, e.g. by extracellular matrix remodeling, may be important to cancer metastasis.... Read more »

  • February 17, 2011
  • 08:04 PM
  • 2,394 views

A Lab Murder Mystery

by Linda in the Node

“A researcher is found dead hunched over her lab bench, and seven suspects are in custody. Now it’s up to 30 high school students to determine who killed her.” To quote from the UBC Science newsletter. Don’t be alarmed, this isn’t tabloid fodder. It’s actually part of a high school out-reach program, organized by UBC’s grad student [...]... Read more »

Caylib Durand and Santiago Ramón-García. (2010) The Use of Popular Fiction to Present a Professional Scientific Career to High School Students. JOURNAL OF MICROBIOLOGY , 166-167. info:/10.1128/jmbe.v11i2.19

  • February 17, 2011
  • 06:26 PM
  • 2,219 views

Blood coming out the wazoo

by PalMD in White Coat Underground

The ICU can be a terrifying place for an intern.  Of course, the patients are probably a bit more frightened, but then, many of them are unconscious.  Rounds are endless in the ICU; new admissions, work rounds, teaching rounds, evaluations for transfer, afternoon rounds, lasix rounds (don’t ask), all punctuated by CPR codes on the [...]... Read more »

  • February 17, 2011
  • 04:28 PM
  • 1,272 views

Beta hydroxybutyrate might make you smarter

by Lucas Tafur in Ketotic

BHB and derivatives could enhance memory and learning... Read more »

Zou XH, Li HM, Wang S, Leski M, Yao YC, Yang XD, Huang QJ, & Chen GQ. (2009) The effect of 3-hydroxybutyrate methyl ester on learning and memory in mice. Biomaterials, 30(8), 1532-41. PMID: 19111894  

  • February 17, 2011
  • 04:10 PM
  • 1,311 views

The Functional Anatomy of Sitting: part 2

by potto in terrible puny rightness

In my last post on koalas I discussed how they evolved to fit into a very specific ecological niche and how they lost some brain in the process.  Here, I’d like to suggest that they might have also gained something perhaps more formidable than brain when it comes to survival these days:  Cuteness. Grand and [...]... Read more »

  • February 17, 2011
  • 04:08 PM
  • 2,488 views

Long-term English language learners

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

When I first started teaching in Australia, I had a Korean-Australian student in one of my undergraduate classes who sounded like most of the other students in my class, like a native speaker of Australian-English. The daughter of Korean immigrants, … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 17, 2011
  • 03:20 PM
  • 1,298 views

XMRV infection of Rhesus macaques

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

The first detailed study of infection of nonhuman primates with the retrovirus XMRV reveals that the virus establishes a persistent infection characterized by infection of multiple tissues. Viremia (virus in the blood) is low and transient, with proviral DNA detectable in blood lymphocytes. The results show that the Rhesus macaque can be used to study [...]... Read more »

Onlamoon, N, DasGupta, J, Sharma, P, Rogers, K, Suppiah, S, Rhea, J, Molinaro, RJ, Gaughan, C, Dong, B, Klein, E.... (2011) Infection, viral dissemination and antibody responses of Rhesus macaques exposed to the human gammaretrovirus XMRV. Journal of Virology. info:/

  • February 17, 2011
  • 03:18 PM
  • 3,631 views

A Decade of Penn Medicine Research Translates into a New Drug for Depression

by Kim Menard in Penn Medicine News Blog

Tucked away in two separate labs at the Department of Psychiatry at Penn Medicine, researchers have spent more than a decade researching and testing a new treatment for depression. The drug became the first new medicine to treat depression in more than a decade when it received FDA approval in January.... Read more »

  • February 17, 2011
  • 03:01 PM
  • 1,452 views

Autism: Social Lives of Young Adults

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

One of the problems with understanding the natural history of autism is the lack of well-designed outcome studies in the disorder.  Outcome studies tend to be expensive and grant agencies commonly do not fund studies longer than a few years. However, given the increased interest and funding in autism, I suspect there will be more research in this area.An example of how outcome studies help in understanding the natural history of autism is a study published ahead of print by the Journal........ Read more »

  • February 17, 2011
  • 02:36 PM
  • 1,670 views

Holifield needs your help

by nuclear.kelly in Miss Atomic Bomb

Below is the text of a letter in support of the continued operation of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Lab. It currently has a dozen signatures attached to it, with more being added daily. If you agree with the letter, consider contacting your representatives and asking them to grant us a fair review.It would be a great tragedy to see the operating budget for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory cut, as has been pr........ Read more »

Jones, K., Adekola, A., Bardayan, D., Blackmon, J., Chae, K., Chipps, K., Cizewski, J., Erikson, L., Harlin, C., Hatarik, R.... (2010) The magic nature of 132Sn explored through the single-particle states of 133Sn. Nature, 465(7297), 454-457. DOI: 10.1038/nature09048  

Beene, J., Bardayan, D., Galindo Uribarri, A., Gross, C., Jones, K., Liang, J., Nazarewicz, W., Stracener, D., Tatum, B., & Varner, R. (2011) ISOL science at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics, 38(2), 24002. DOI: 10.1088/0954-3899/38/2/024002  

  • February 17, 2011
  • 12:49 PM
  • 1,908 views

Clean water and education could outperform vaccines at reducing Haiti cholera epidemic

by Maria José Viñas in GeoSpace

Even though the deadly cholera epidemic in Haiti is now spreading more slowly, health officials are still working to prevent as many new cases as possible. Detailed models of the disease’s spread help those in charge of making public health decisions understand the effectiveness of control measures, from vaccines to investments in clean water supply and education.... Read more »

E. Bertuzzo, L. Mari, L. Righetto, M. Gatto, R. Casagrandi, M. Blokesch, I. Rodriguez-Iturbe, & A. Rinaldo. (2011) Prediction of the spatial evolution and effects of control measures for the unfolding Haiti cholera outbreak. Geophysical Research Letters. info:/10.1029

  • February 17, 2011
  • 12:17 PM
  • 1,921 views

Chromothripsis and Cancer

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

The traditional cancer paradigm is one of progressive disease, in which cells gradually accumulate genomic rearrangements and point mutations over years (or decades), resulting in incremental progression through a series of increasingly malignant stages. New research has challenged that model. Using next-generation sequencing, Stephens et al have characterized a phenomenon in which tens to hundreds [...]... Read more »

Stephens PJ, Greenman CD, Fu B, Yang F, Bignell GR, Mudie LJ, Pleasance ED, Lau KW, Beare D, Stebbings LA.... (2011) Massive genomic rearrangement acquired in a single catastrophic event during cancer development. Cell, 144(1), 27-40. PMID: 21215367  

  • February 17, 2011
  • 12:00 PM
  • 1,276 views

Can we count on journal metrics?

by sciencebase in Sciencebase Science Blog

How do you rank science, how do you rate scientists, what kudos do you give their papers and what metrics do you attach to the impact of a paper? They’re questions as old as the scientific literature itself. But, no one has resolved them. Independent organisations and publishers have attempted with the likes of the [...]Can we count on journal metrics? is a post from: Sciencebase Science Blog
... Read more »

  • February 17, 2011
  • 10:33 AM
  • 6,935 views

Video game addiction in teens: A problem or a myth?

by Nestor Lopez-Duran PhD in Child-Psych

During the last decade there has been much debate about the dangers of excessive video game playing. Some have argued that excessive video game playing can become an addition and can lead to many negative consequences. Yet, much of the research linking video game playing to negative factors had methodological limitations that prevented the researchers [...]... Read more »

Gentile, D., Choo, H., Liau, A., Sim, T., Li, D., Fung, D., & Khoo, A. (2011) Pathological Video Game Use Among Youths: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study. PEDIATRICS, 127(2). DOI: 10.1542/peds.2010-1353  

  • February 17, 2011
  • 10:23 AM
  • 1,306 views

Macrophages, cancer and rejection

by Richard Grant in Naturally Selected

Development of the vasculature of solid cancers (tumour angiogenesis) is a promising target for therapy, leading to interest in proteins such as angiostatin, endostatin and tumstatin. These generally act to inhibit tumor angiogenesis, but there’s also been a fair amount … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 17, 2011
  • 10:23 AM
  • 1,137 views

Macrophages, cancer and rejection

by Richard Grant in Faculty of 1000

Development of the vasculature of solid cancers (tumour angiogenesis) is a promising target for therapy, leading to interest in proteins such as angiostatin, endostatin and tumstatin. These generally act to inhibit tumor angiogenesis, but there’s also been a fair amount … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 17, 2011
  • 09:38 AM
  • 2,790 views

Can we visualise virus infection as it happens - in real-time?

by Connor Bamford in The Rule of 6ix


One worthwhile way to study viruses – and other micro-organisms – is to see where exactly they are found within a host. How do they enter the body? What organs do they infect and how? How do they spread from tissue to tissue and organ to organ? How do they exit the body? These are just some of the questions which it would be good to actually SEE how and where it happens. Maybe then we could better understand the dynamic relationships governing infection and disease; maybe then we could de........ Read more »

Brandenburg, B., & Zhuang, X. (2007) Virus trafficking – learning from single-virus tracking. Nature Reviews Microbiology, 5(3), 197-208. DOI: 10.1038/nrmicro1615  

Hofherr, S., Adams, K., Chen, C., May, S., Weaver, E., & Barry, M. (2011) Real-Time Dynamic Imaging of Virus Distribution In Vivo. PLoS ONE, 6(2). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0017076  

  • February 17, 2011
  • 09:30 AM
  • 1,416 views

Flooding and the Great Barrier Reef (and my 1st article)

by Linda Lin in Oz Blog No. 159

It's been a few weeks now since the historic flood in Australia. Pretty much all that water has now gone into the oceans, with various effects on the wild life there. The impact of floodwaters isn't as extensive as you...... Read more »

De'ath G, & Fabricius K. (2010) Water quality as a regional driver of coral biodiversity and macroalgae on the Great Barrier Reef. Ecological applications : a publication of the Ecological Society of America, 20(3), 840-50. PMID: 20437968  

Anthony, K., Kline, D., Diaz-Pulido, G., Dove, S., & Hoegh-Guldberg, O. (2008) Ocean acidification causes bleaching and productivity loss in coral reef builders. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 105(45), 17442-17446. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0804478105  

  • February 17, 2011
  • 09:00 AM
  • 2,725 views

Are you sure you’re allergic to penicillin?

by Scott in Science-Based Pharmacy

As a pharmacist, when I dispense medication, it’s my responsibility to ensure that the medication is safe and appropriate for the patient. There are numerous checks we go through including verifying the dose, ensuring there are no interactions with other drugs, and verifying the patient has no history of allergy to the product prescribed. Asking [...]... Read more »

Caubet JC, Kaiser L, Lemaître B, Fellay B, Gervaix A, & Eigenmann PA. (2011) The role of penicillin in benign skin rashes in childhood: a prospective study based on drug rechallenge. The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology, 127(1), 218-22. PMID: 21035175  

  • February 17, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 4,081 views

Are you sure you’re allergic to penicillin?

by Scott Gavura in Science-Based Medicine

As a pharmacist, when I dispense medication, it’s my responsibility to ensure that the medication is safe and appropriate for the patient. There are numerous checks we go through including verifying the dose, ensuring there are no interactions with other drugs, and verifying the patient has no history of allergy to the product prescribed. Asking [...]... Read more »

Caubet JC, Kaiser L, Lemaître B, Fellay B, Gervaix A, & Eigenmann PA. (2011) The role of penicillin in benign skin rashes in childhood: a prospective study based on drug rechallenge. The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology, 127(1), 218-22. PMID: 21035175  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SRI Technology.

To learn more, visit http://selfregulationinstitute.org/.