Post List

  • November 23, 2010
  • 01:36 AM
  • 941 views

Some new yellow-tailed woolly monkeys on the block.

by seriousmonkeybusiness in This is Serious Monkey Business

Here's something to get some holiday cheer in your lives a little early: a new population of critically endangered yellow-tailed woolly monkey was discovered recently!--but who are these guys and what exactly does this mean?... Read more »

Anneke M. DeLuycker. (2007) Notes on the Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey (Oreonax flavicauda) and Its Status in the Protected Forest of Alto Mayo, Northern Peru. Primate Conservation, 41-47. info:/

  • November 22, 2010
  • 09:40 PM
  • 469 views

Towards Preventing Cancer Metastasis

by Michael Long in Phased

Cancer metastasizes in part by bringing stromal cells from the primary tumor to the new site of colonization. This knowledge was used to disrupt metastasis in mice.... Read more »

Dan G. Duda,, Annique M. M. J. Duyverman,, Mitsutomo Kohno,, Matija Snuderl,, Ernst J. A. Steller,, Dai Fukumura,, & Rakesh K. Jain. (2010) Malignant cells facilitate lung metastasis by bringing their own soil. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. info:/10.1073/pnas.1016234107

  • November 22, 2010
  • 07:36 PM
  • 808 views

Neural compensation and autism

by Jon Wilkins in Lost in Transcription

This recent PNAS paper uses fMRI to identify neural signatures specifically associated with unaffected siblings of people with autism.... Read more »

Kaiser MD, Hudac CM, Shultz S, Lee SM, Cheung C, Berken AM, Deen B, Pitskel NB, Sugrue DR, Voos AC.... (2010) Neural signatures of autism. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 21078973  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 07:18 PM
  • 427 views

I always knew that Automatic Defibrillators were rubbish, now I have Evidence.

by Steve in Refertomedics

I was really smug to read an article in JAMA telling me that automatic defibrillators don’t improve survival in hospitals. I really detest automatic defibrillators, I detest the way they tell you how to run an arrest using a really patronising American voice. I am a professional damit, I don’t need a machine, an annoying [...]... Read more »

Chan, P., Krumholz, H., Spertus, J., Jones, P., Cram, P., Berg, R., Peberdy, M., Nadkarni, V., Mancini, M., Nallamothu, B.... (2010) Automated External Defibrillators and Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 304(19), 2129-2136. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2010.1576  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 04:34 PM
  • 1,143 views

Flare-ups, breakthrough pain or set-backs: self managing exacerbations of pain

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

A couple of days ago I wrote about medication and managing flare-ups, and out of that post there was a bit of discussion about what exactly I meant by flare-up, and whether it might be better defined as break-through pain.  I’ve found that there is not a lot of agreement in the literature – nor … Read more... Read more »

Turk, D.C., Swanson, K.S., & Tunks, E.R. (2008) Psychological approaches in the treatment of chronic pain patients--When pills, scalpels, and needles are not enough. The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 53(4), 213-223. info:/

  • November 22, 2010
  • 04:26 PM
  • 2,017 views

Omega-3′s and heart disease: where’s the evidence?

by PalMD in White Coat Underground

Omega-3 fatty acids (more properly called “n-3 fatty acids”) are a group of naturally occurring fat molecules.  They are found mainly in fish and other marine-derived oils, but some can also be extracted from plants.  Omega-3′s are currently very popular, but the evidence for their usefulness isn’t so clear.   A recent study failed to [...]... Read more »

Kromhout, D., Giltay, E., & Geleijnse, J. (2010) n–3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Events after Myocardial Infarction. New England Journal of Medicine, 363(21), 2015-2026. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1003603  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 03:32 PM
  • 1,147 views

Drug-Drug Interactions to Watch Out For

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox


P450 enzymes and “poor metabolizers.”

The finding, published in Science, is a bit arcane to the layperson. The big secret of how the P450 enzyme family metabolizes drugs turns out to be a critical phase change, where an oxygen molecule temporarily joins the mix, forming “Compound I,” a process the scientists documented by cooling the enzymes at just the right rate. 

So what? Well, for starters, “cytochrome P450 enzymes are responsible for the phase I metabolism of approximatel........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 03:17 PM
  • 1,487 views

A synaesthetic mouse?

by Kevin Mitchell in Wiring the Brain

An amazing study just published in Cell starts out with fruit flies insensitive to pain and ends up with what looks very like a synaesthetic mouse. Penninger and colleagues were interested in the mechanisms of pain sensation and have been using the fruit fly as a model to investigate the underlying biological processes. Like any good geneticist faced with profound ignorance of how a process works, they began by screening for mutant flies that are insensitive to pain. Making use of a very powe........ Read more »

Beauchamp MS, & Ro T. (2008) Neural substrates of sound-touch synesthesia after a thalamic lesion. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 28(50), 13696-702. PMID: 19074042  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 02:21 PM
  • 1,025 views

Personality and Behavioural Ecology

by sandygautam in The Mouse Trap

Image by The Happy Robot via Flickr I am an avid personality researcher and most recently have posted a series on personality and emotion. I have also talked a bit about life-history theories and thus am aware of  the broad filed of behavioral ecology. A recent paper by Nettle and Penke brings the two fieldsRating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)... Read more »

Nettle, D., & Penke, L. (2010) Personality: bridging the literatures from human psychology and behavioural ecology. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 365(1560), 4043-4050. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2010.0061  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 02:18 PM
  • 1,668 views

Physical Virology

by Manuel Sánchez in Small Things Considered

Physical Virology. Such is the title of the article that appeared in Nature Physics. This is the name for a new discipline that is under development. Its focus is the study of viruses from a physical perspective. Seen this way, viruses are natural nanoparticles with distinct mechanical and thermodynamic properties

Professors W. Ross and G.J.L Wuite of the Foundation For Fundamental Research On Matter of the University of Amsterdam and R. Bruinsma of the Physics Department at UCLA summarize in........ Read more »

Roos, W., Bruinsma, R., & Wuite, G. (2010) Physical virology. Nature Physics, 6(10), 733-743. DOI: 10.1038/nphys1797  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 01:39 PM
  • 578 views

Plant-Arthropod Interactions in the Fossil Record

by Marc in Teaching Biology

An introduction into how fossil traces left on plants by insects can give us information on climate, ecology nd evolution.... Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 01:35 PM
  • 1,562 views

The Obesity Paradox Revisited

by Travis Saunders, MSc in Obesity Panacea

As Peter and I discuss frequently here at Obesity Panacea, the relationship between body weight and health is not always as neat and tidy as you might expect (For all the details, check out Peter’s 5-part series on metabolically healthy obesity). A recent paper published in the International Journal of Obesity by Drs DK Childers and David Allison examines a number of these issues, and suggests ways that they may be at least partially resolved.

In the intro to this new paper, the author........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 01:27 PM
  • 1,218 views

Frank Fenner, MD, 1914-2010

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

Australian virologist Frank Fenner, MD was born in Ballarat, Victoria in 1914. He earned a Doctor of Medicine in 1942 at the University of Adelaide, and from 1940 – 1946 he worked on the malaria parasite in Egypt and Papua New Guinea as an officer in the Australian Army Medical Corps. He subsequently began studying the [...]... Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 01:07 PM
  • 1,270 views

Playing with cars - can crows make their own roadkill?

by davesbrain in Dave Hubble's ecology spot

It is well known that carrion crows (Corvus corone) frequently feed from roadkill. As they lack a bill specialised for tearing into flesh, they may need a carcass to be opened by another animal before being able to scavenge – a job done very effectively by the impact of a vehicle.In Japan, they have been seen to use cars to crack walnuts, placing them on pedestrian crossings when the traffic stops, and after traffic has passed, waiting for the lights to change again in order to collect the ope........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 11:52 AM
  • 813 views

Stepping in a Pile of…New Genomic Data

by Rob Mitchum in ScienceLife

Genomic sequencing has made incredible strides in recent years, with both the cost and the time required to sequence an individual’s entire DNA sequence dropping meteorically. Yet one rate-limiting step for securing an organism’s genome remains: in order to sequence a species’ genetic information, you need a sample to start with. In humans or laboratory [...]... Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 11:11 AM
  • 989 views

Is “Bottom Up” Science Possible?

by Jörg Friedrich in Reading Nature

Research projects waste millions or billions of euros, so is it conceivable and possible for amateurs to operate serious scientific research in their garage or at their home desk? Can you imagine that individual amateur scientists or small groups of … Continue reading →... Read more »

Ledford H. (2010) Garage biotech: Life hackers. Nature, 467(7316), 650-2. PMID: 20930820  

Nature Editorial. (2010) Garage biology. Nature, 467(7316), 634. PMID: 20930797  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 11:01 AM
  • 945 views

Stressing Motherhood: A primatologist discovers the social factors responsible for maternal infanticide. (Scientific American)

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Scientific American:Throughout history, from the fictional Medea to the tragic reports of modern times, women have taken the lives of their children under a variety of contexts, whether it is to punish the father, escape from the burden of motherhood, or even to protect a child from what they perceive as a fate worse than death. In this regard humans share yet another feature, albeit a tragic one, with nonhuman animals since females in a varie........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 11:01 AM
  • 774 views

Stressing Motherhood: A primatologist discovers the social factors responsible for maternal infanticide. (Scientific American)

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Scientific American:Throughout history, from the fictional Medea to the tragic reports of modern times, women have taken the lives of their children under a variety of contexts, whether it is to punish the father, escape from the burden of motherhood, or even to protect a child from what they perceive as a fate worse than death. In this regard humans share yet another feature, albeit a tragic one, with nonhuman animals since females in a varie........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 10:46 AM
  • 1,219 views

Research – The World’s Smallest Water Bottle (Literally)

by Paul Vallett in Electron Cafe

How small is the world’s smallest water bottle? Well, imagine a water bottle that can only hold a single water molecule. As ridiculous as it sounds that’s what a group in Beijing has been able to achieve. They were able to use a modified carbon cage, commonly known as a buckyball, as the bottle to [...]... Read more »

Zhang, Q., Pankewitz, T., Liu, S., Klopper, W., & Gan, L. (2010) Switchable Open-Cage Fullerene for Water Encapsulation. Angewandte Chemie International Edition. DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004879  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 10:32 AM
  • 787 views

Koreaceratops—A Swimming Ceratopsian?

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

Hot on the heels of a team of researchers who described Zhuchengceratops from the Cretaceous of China, paleontologists Yuong-Nam Lee, Michael J. Ryan and Yoshitsugu Kobayashi have just announced the discovery of another ceratopsian dinosaur—Koreaceratops hwaseongensis—from the 103-million-year-old rock of South Korea. It is the first dinosaur of its kind to be found in the [...]... Read more »

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