Post List

  • March 4, 2010
  • 04:59 PM
  • 1,124 views

East Siberian Arctic Ocean discovered to be venting a lot of methane

by Phil Camill in Global Change: Intersection of Nature and Culture


Methane (CH4) release from ocean sediments has long intrigued scientists.  There is an event that happened 54 million years ago called the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), when up to 4,500 gigatons of carbon were released from the oceans, possibly as one large methane burp caused by an underwater landslide.
That’s a lot of carbon—more than 10 [...]... Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 04:20 PM
  • 1,311 views

With a little help from our friends: Finding a home for E-ELT

by sarah in One Small Step

ESO announced today that their Council have recommended Cerro Armazones in the Chilean Andes as the preferred site for their next generation optical/IR observatory, the 42-m European Extremely Large Telescope. The decision came in response to the delivery of a technical report by the organisation’s E-ELT Site Selection Advisory Committee, from which Armazones emerged as [...]... Read more »

M. Schoeck, S. Els, R. Riddle, W. Skidmore, T. Travouillon, R. Blum, E. Bustos, G. Chanan, S. G. Djorgovski, P. Gillett.... (2009) Thirty Meter Telescope Site Testing I: Overview. PASP. arXiv: 0904.1183v1

Skidmore, Warren, Els, Sebastian, Travouillon, Tony, Riddle, Reed, Schöck, Matthias, Bustos, Edison, Seguel, Juan, & Walker, David. (2009) Thirty Meter Telescope Site Testing V: Seeing and Isoplanatic Angle. PASP, 121(884), 1151-1166. info:/10.1086/644758

  • March 4, 2010
  • 03:47 PM
  • 612 views

Uncorked

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

Methane is escaping from an Arctic shelf

... Read more »

Shakhova, N. et al. (2010) Extensive methane venting to the atmosphere from sediments of the East Siberian Arctic Shelf. Science. info:/10.1126/science.1182221

  • March 4, 2010
  • 03:45 PM
  • 647 views

Don't Know Where The Time Went? Guess You Were Having Fun...

by Daniel Hawes in Ingenious Monkey | 20-two-5

We all know the feeling that time flies, when we're having fun. Turns out, this also works in the other direction...Another nice incidence of bidirectional information processing.... Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 03:36 PM
  • 1,145 views

Rolling out the (optical) carpet: the Talbot effect

by gg in Skulls in the Stars

One of the wonderful things about having a career in science is that a deeper understanding of the science leads to a greater appreciation of its beauty.  In physics, this usually requires a nontrivial amount of mathematics, but there are some phenomena that are self-evidently beautiful; unfortunately, many of these are also not very well [...]... Read more »

H.F. Talbot. (1836) Facts relating to optical science. No. IV. Philosophical Magazine, 401-407. info:/

  • March 4, 2010
  • 03:33 PM
  • 887 views

I’m Certain That I Can Certainly be Wrong or Confidence and Memory, Is one a Good Measure of the Other?

by Darcy Cowan in Skepticon


A man is the sum of his memories, you know, a Time Lord even more so.
The Doctor, in “The Five Doctors”

We all know that our memories can’t always be trusted, time and life tends to erode the confidence we have in our memories. At least that is the case for normal memories. We also tend [...]... Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 02:52 PM
  • 418 views

Ecologists go online, the world benefits?

by Katie Kline in EcoTone

Science can take a page out of the World Health Organization’s book when it comes to tracking and aiding in global health. Its online database, the Global Public Health Intelligence Network (GPHIN), is an early disease detection system developed by Health Canada; it collects data on unusual disease events by monitoring news wires, websites and online newspapers in eight languages. But what can ecologists take away from this?... Read more »

Galaz, V., Crona, B., Daw, T., Bodin, �., Nyström, M., & Olsson, P. (2010) Can web crawlers revolutionize ecological monitoring?. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 8(2), 99-104. DOI: 10.1890/070204  

  • March 4, 2010
  • 02:47 PM
  • 409 views

Ecologists go online, the world benefits?

by Katie Kline in EcoTone

Science can take a page out of the World Health Organization’s book when it comes to tracking and aiding in global health. Its online database, the Global Public Health Intelligence Network (GPHIN), is an early disease detection system developed by Health Canada; it collects data on unusual disease events by monitoring news wires, websites and online newspapers in eight languages. But what can ecologists take away from this?

... Read more »

Galaz, V., Crona, B., Daw, T., Bodin, �., Nyström, M., & Olsson, P. (2010) Can web crawlers revolutionize ecological monitoring?. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 8(2), 99-104. DOI: 10.1890/070204  

  • March 4, 2010
  • 01:30 PM
  • 877 views

Orchids wither with stress, but bloom with care

by sandygautam in The Mouse Trap






Image via Wikipedia



Traditionally, it has been evident that some children who show high stress reactivity or inbuilt vulnerability to stress (the diathesis of stress-diathesis model) fare badly when exposed to adverse early life circumstances/events. These adverse environmental influences can range from marital discord in family to stress of being born in a low socio economic More >Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)


Related posts:Stress contagion: from parents to the child? Greg Downey ........ Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 12:06 PM
  • 931 views

An innovative approach for monitoring tidal wetland restoration success

by Rob Goldstein in Conservation Maven

Researchers from the US Geological Survey at the San Francisco Bay Estuary Station have created a new, cost-effect, and more accurate method for measuring early sediment accretion in restored, tidal marshes.

Their innovative method involves using sound waves to determine water depth. The echosounder system is mounted onto a shallow draft kayak and includes an acoustic profiler, GPS unit, and laptop computer.... Read more »

Takekawa, J., Woo, I., Athearn, N., Demers, S., Gardiner, R., Perry, W., Ganju, N., Shellenbarger, G., & Schoellhamer, D. (2010) Measuring sediment accretion in early tidal marsh restoration. Wetlands Ecology and Management. DOI: 10.1007/s11273-009-9170-6  

  • March 4, 2010
  • 10:43 AM
  • 794 views

Finding a Benefit Inside a Risk

by Rob Mitchum in ScienceLife

In a perfect world, patients would only have one serious condition at a time that could be treated in isolation. But that’s not the case: when a doctor is considering treatment for one disease, they must take into account the other illnesses and treatments ongoing in a patient. Even relatively innocent and common drugs, such [...]... Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 09:55 AM
  • 721 views

New Fossils Suggest High Diversity Among Close Dinosaur Relatives

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

What were the very first dinosaurs like? This is one of the most vexing questions in vertebrate paleontology. Even though paleontologists have found a number of early dinosaurs in recent years, details about the very first dinosaurs and their close relatives have been hard to come by, but in a new paper published this week [...]... Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 09:01 AM
  • 1,102 views

The neverending hurricane-climate story

by James Hrynyshyn in Class M

It's a sore spot for some climate change pseudoskeptics. Any time anyone makes any kind of claim about the effects of a warming planet on tropical storm activity, you can count on a deluge of rejoinders about how shaky the science on the subject really is. Read the rest of this post... | Read the comments on this post...... Read more »

Knutson, T., McBride, J., Chan, J., Emanuel, K., Holland, G., Landsea, C., Held, I., Kossin, J., Srivastava, A., & Sugi, M. (2010) Tropical cyclones and climate change. Nature Geoscience, 3(3), 157-163. DOI: 10.1038/ngeo779  

  • March 4, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 776 views

Forensic saliva test within spitting distance

by sciencebase in Sciencebase Science Blog

The latest issue of SpectroscopyNOW is online. This week I cover everything from MRI for testicular cancer to egg-shaped carbon balls by way of energy molecules, copper proteins, secret writing, first up a forensic test for distinguishing saliva deposits from other substances at a crime scene:
Non-destructive spit test – Raman spectroscopy can identify samples of [...]Forensic saliva test within spitting distance is a post from: Sciencebase Science Blog
... Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,057 views

Quantifying open space loss from urban sprawl

by Rob Goldstein in Conservation Maven

... Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,663 views

Beer makes humans more attractive to malarial mosquitoes

by Ed Yong in Not Exactly Rocket Science

We've all heard about "beer goggles", the mythical, invisible eyewear that makes everyone else seem incredibly attractive after a few pints too many. If only beer had the reverse effect, making the drinker seem irresistibly attractive. Well, the good news is that beer does actually do this. The bad news is that the ones who are attracted at malarial mosquitoes.

Anopheles gambiae (the mosquito that transmits malaria) tracks its victims by their smells. By wafting the aromas of humans over thousa........ Read more »

Lefèvre, T., Gouagna, L., Dabiré, K., Elguero, E., Fontenille, D., Renaud, F., Costantini, C., & Thomas, F. (2010) Beer Consumption Increases Human Attractiveness to Malaria Mosquitoes. PLoS ONE, 5(3). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009546  

  • March 4, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,124 views

Can jellyfish see colour?

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

“Jellyfish? See colours? That’s crazy talk! They’d need eyes to do that! They don’t even have brains, do they?”

Some jellyfish do have eyes to go along with their well-developed central nervous system. These are box jellies, which are generally better known because some of their number contains rather deadly toxins. If that wasn’t scary enough, they have eyes. In fact, they have lots of eyes.

Rhophalia are sensory structures that you can see as black dots about two thirds of the wa........ Read more »

O'Connor, M., Garm, A., Marshall, J., Hart, N., Ekstrom, P., Skogh, C., & Nilsson, D. (2010) Visual pigment in the lens eyes of the box jellyfish Chiropsella bronzie. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2009.2248  

  • March 4, 2010
  • 06:29 AM
  • 2,011 views

Sildenafil citrate: Entity of the Month

by Duncan Hull in O'Really?

Release 66 of Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) is now available, containing 534,521 total entities, of which 20,151 are annotated entities and 698 were submitted via the ChEBI submission tool. This months entity of the month is Viagra, also known as Sildenafil citrate: (Text below reproduced from ChEBI website)
Few chemical compounds are better known [...]... Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 06:15 AM
  • 489 views

Blowing out the candles

by iayork in Mystery Rays from Outer Space

Our cells die all the time, in vast numbers.  Cells are programmed to die when all kinds of things happen: They may have reached the end of their productive life (as with cells of the gut or skin); they may detect damage to their DNA (as in cancer); or they may have detected viral infection. [...]... Read more »

  • March 4, 2010
  • 03:44 AM
  • 2,055 views

cold? what cold? it’s the uv rays that’ll kill you

by Greg Fish in weird things

It’s not that Mars is hostile to life as we know it, it’s just that even the toughest terrestrial microorganisms able to survive a big gamma ray burst from a nearby nuclear reactor die within ten minutes of exposure to a close simulation to the conditions on the red planet’s surface. That seems to be [...]... Read more »

Giuseppe Galletta; Giulio Bertoloni; Maurizio D'Alessandro. (2010) Bacterial survival in Martian conditions. Planetary and Space Science . arXiv: 1002.4077v1

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