Post List

  • January 28, 2011
  • 06:22 AM
  • 966 views

Initial Characterization of the Human Central Proteome

by avi_wener in The European Biotechnologist

A research team from the Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Lazarettgasse recently published a paper in the open access journal BMC Systems Biology characterizing what they termed “the human central proteome.” Whenever a study comes out that characterizes a “central” process, pathway, proteomic or genomic subset I am always [...]... Read more »

Thomas R Burkard, Melanie Planyavsky, Ines Kaupe, Florian P Breitwieser, Tilmann Buerckstuemmer, Keiryn L Bennett, Giulio Superti-Furga, & Jacques Colinge. (2011) Initial characterization of the human central proteome. BMC Systems Biology. info:/

  • January 28, 2011
  • 05:33 AM
  • 1,168 views

Reverse Bestiality: When Animals Commit Sexual Assault

by Christie Wilcox in Observations of a Nerd

Sexual assault is no laughing matter - unless, of course, the would-be rapist isn't human. Who doesn't giggle when they see a small dog humping someone's leg? But what many people don't realize is that reverse bestiality - where an animal makes unwanted sexual advances on a person - is a true problem for scientists working in the field where the actions of wild animals are completely unpredictable.... Read more »

Brian Bowen. (2007) Sexual Harassment By A Male Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas). Marine Turtle Newsletter, 10. info:/

  • January 28, 2011
  • 05:30 AM
  • 1,071 views

Better genomics through chemistry

by Becky in It Takes 30

There’s been a little flurry of papers from UCSF recently about using chemical and environmental perturbations to ask when and why you need the function of a particular gene.  I originally thought I might try to write about all of them at once, but no — there’s more here than I can do justice to [...]... Read more »

Nichols RJ, Sen S, Choo YJ, Beltrao P, Zietek M, Chaba R, Lee S, Kazmierczak KM, Lee KJ, Wong A.... (2011) Phenotypic landscape of a bacterial cell. Cell, 144(1), 143-56. PMID: 21185072  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 03:42 AM
  • 957 views

Are you smarter than a chimpanzee?

by Mike Braverman in ionpsych

Hollywood seems to think so. Nerds in the audience know that visiting aliens, if they speak at all, often say something flattering. “We just think you’re super. We’re here to admire you for being better than other life in every … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 02:50 AM
  • 1,173 views

Friday Weird Science: The new cure for the hiccups? Rectal stimulation

by Scicurious in Neurotic Physiology

Yeah, you heard me right. We all have various ways of attempting to get rid of the hiccups. Drinking a glass of water backward, eating a spoonfull of sugar, getting surprised or scared, holding your breath. The list goes on. But what if those DON’T WORK? What if even medications don’t work!? Wherever shall you [...]... Read more »

Odeh M, Bassan H, & Oliven A. (1990) Termination of intractable hiccups with digital rectal massage. Journal of internal medicine, 227(2), 145-6. PMID: 2299306  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 01:16 AM
  • 1,028 views

Science Online 2011: Underrepresentation hurts us all

by Kate Clancy in Context & Variation

In my second year of graduate school, I was in a study group with a few other grad students: in particular I remember a white female student and an Asian-American female student. Somehow we got on the topic of admissions, where we all admitted, jokingly, to feeling like impostors. Then the white female student stated that she didn't believe in affirmative action, and expressed her view with quite a bit of anger. "Besides," she finished, "I just don't see race."I was completely paralyzed, and fel........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 12:48 AM
  • 1,610 views

Brand Anthropology: New and Improved, with Extra Diversity!

by gregdowney in Neuroanthropology

Since graduating from high school, I’ve several times worked as a salesman, first flogging reference books door-to-door over summers while an undergraduate and later, while writing my dissertation, getting involved in the ‘design consulting’ business where I helped sell something a lot less tangible.  Sales was a great training ground for an anthropologist: nothing prepares you for quickly manufacturing social relations like slogging around door-to-door with a sample case, and a large lec........ Read more »

Hannerz, U. (2010) Diversity Is Our Business. American Anthropologist, 112(4), 539-551. DOI: 10.1111/j.1548-1433.2010.01274.x  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 12:48 AM
  • 1,385 views

Brand Anthropology: New and Improved, with Extra Diversity!

by Daniel Lende in Neuroanthropology PLoS

Since graduating from high school, I’ve several times worked as a salesman, first flogging reference books door-to-door over summers while an undergraduate and later, while writing my dissertation, getting involved in the ‘design consulting’ business where I helped sell something a lot less tangible.  Sales was a great training ground for an anthropologist: nothing prepares you for quickly manufacturing social relations like slogging around door-to-door with a sample case, and a large lec........ Read more »

Hannerz, U. (2010) Diversity Is Our Business. American Anthropologist, 112(4), 539-551. DOI: 10.1111/j.1548-1433.2010.01274.x  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 12:40 AM
  • 722 views

Hijacked. Does cocaine take control the brain?

by B.F. Hebb in ionpsych

Cocaine's effect on neurons and the brain may be more unique than previously thought.... Read more »

Barron AB, Maleszka R, Helliwell PG, & Robinson GE. (2009) Effects of cocaine on honey bee dance behaviour. The Journal of experimental biology, 212(Pt 2), 163-8. PMID: 19112134  

  • January 27, 2011
  • 11:05 PM
  • 792 views

A species by any other name...would leave us with the same problem

by zacharoo in Lawn Chair Anthropology

This is a great big week for anthropology coverage. The sequencing of the orangutan (Pongo species) genome made the cover of Nature. It's grant-writing-dissertation-formulating-prelim-studying time for me so I haven't had a chance to read this one yet. Science has a couple paleoanthropology-related stories, including two by Ann Gibbons. The first is about recent research on ancient DNA, and how this informs the debate about 'modern human' origins. But there's also a short blurb on what the eff "........ Read more »

  • January 27, 2011
  • 10:56 PM
  • 1,421 views

125 Year Old Hand Axes From Jebel Faya, UAE

by Kambiz Kamrani in Anthropology.net

Hans-Peter Uerpmann of the University of Tubingen has lead a team excavating the Jebel Faya site in the United Arab Emirates, right near the Straits of Hormuz. They’ve found 125,000 year old stone tools that look like early modern human tools … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 27, 2011
  • 10:49 PM
  • 539 views

Is Your Child Genuinely Helpful?

by Zijing He in ionpsych

Even after years of research experience with young children, I was still amazed by toddlers’ helping behavior elicited by the host Alan Alda in “the Human Spark series” on PBS. The researchers from the Max Planck Institute recently found that … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 27, 2011
  • 09:46 PM
  • 1,142 views

What we don't know about cognitive enhancement

by Michelle Greene in NeurRealism

The use of prescription drugs such as Ritalin, Adderall and Provigil for increasing attention and work capacity has been controversial. However, in the context of such back and forth fights about the desirability of pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement, we must step back and ask some basic scientific questions:- Do these drugs enhance brain function in people without ADHD or narcolepsy?- Do they work equally well in everyone?- Are there any cognitive trade-offs for using these drugs?This is why ........ Read more »

Husain M, & Mehta MA. (2011) Cognitive enhancement by drugs in health and disease. Trends in cognitive sciences, 15(1), 28-36. PMID: 21146447  

  • January 27, 2011
  • 08:13 PM
  • 1,572 views

Language learning and height

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Are you tall enough to learn English? Have you ever reflected on the relationship between height and language learning? Well, I haven’t, and I’ve been in language teaching and learning for almost 20 years. So, I assume that most of … Continue reading →... Read more »

Chang, Leslie T. (2009) Factory Girls: From Village to City in a Changing China. Spiegel . info:/

  • January 27, 2011
  • 08:00 PM
  • 1,651 views

Tully’s Mystery Monster

by Laelaps in Laelaps

To say that paleontologists can’t make heads or tails of the Tully Monster would be untrue. The claw-tipped proboscis on the front end and the arrow-shaped rear fins at the posterior end can be easily identified in complete specimens. Beyond that, though, this 300 million year old invertebrate remains one of the most vexing fossil [...]... Read more »

Chen, J., Huang, D., & Bottjer, D. (2005) An Early Cambrian problematic fossil: Vetustovermis and its possible affinities. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 272(1576), 2003-2007. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2005.3159  

Ralph Gordon Johnson, Eugene S. Richardson. (1969) The Morphology and Affinities of Tullimonstrum. Fieldiana: Geology, 12(8), 119-149. info:/

  • January 27, 2011
  • 07:01 PM
  • 1,045 views

Don't Assume that fMRI and MEG Will Give You Comparable Results

by Livia in Reading and Word Recognition Research

Accessibility: Intermediate/Advanced



There are three common methods of studying brain function in normal human populations: fMRI, MEG, an EEG. There is surprisingly little crosstalk between the techniques, mostly due to practical issues.For better...

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... Read more »

  • January 27, 2011
  • 06:12 PM
  • 1,566 views

Whose Risk Is This? Take Personal Responsibility in Sports Litigation

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

By: Dr. Kevin Boully “There is danger in all sports, anyone who plays them takes that risk for themselves.” -Mock Juror in recent sports litigation research Athletes choose to play sports that involve risk. Athletic teams, coaches and organizations are aware of the risk just like players So, how much personal responsibility does an individual athlete have for safely participating in his or her chosen sport? What must the player and the organization do to make sure all possible safeguards are........ Read more »

  • January 27, 2011
  • 05:52 PM
  • 1,053 views

Psycasm - Magical Thinking: Voodoo, Prayer, Black Cats, and You

by Rift in Psycasm


Magical thinking is a funny term for a strange phenomenon. Broadly put it is the belief or expectation that our thoughts and actions will influence the future, others, or ourselves. I can only imagine it seems ridiculous for anyone reading this blog to consider the possibility of actually cursing someone, or placing a hex on their family. But I do imagine a certain percentage pray to a bearded man; (read more)

Source: Psycasm - Discipline: Psychology... Read more »

  • January 27, 2011
  • 05:27 PM
  • 1,131 views

The scions of Shem?

by Razib Khan in Gene Expression

The media is reporting rather breathlessly a new find out of Arabia which seems to push much further back the presence of anatomically modern humans in this region (more accurately, the archaeology was so sparse that assessments of human habitation seem to have been made in a vacuum due to absence of evidence). Here is the major objection:
This idea is at odds with a proposal advanced by Richard Klein, a paleoanthropologist at Stanford University, that the emergence of some social or behavioral ........ Read more »

Simon J. Armitage, Sabah A. Jasim, Anthony E. Marks, Adrian G. Parker, Vitaly I. Usik, & Hans-Peter Uerpmann. (2011) The Southern Route “Out of Africa”: Evidence for an Early Expansion of Modern Humans into Arabia. Science. info:/10.1126/science.1199113

  • January 27, 2011
  • 04:50 PM
  • 1,945 views

Cortico-thalamic dissociation in Sleep Paralysis

by gregdowney in Neuroanthropology

By Paul Mason
Paul Mason is a PhD student at Macquarie University and frequent contributor to Neuroanthropology.  He is well on his way to finishing his thesis, but occasionally shares his insightful columns on a wide range of topics here.  Please note that the former ‘Fattest Man in the World’ is a different Paul Mason.

Have you ever woken up and not been able to move your body? For those people who have experienced this sensation, it is unnerving, surreal, and often quite stress........ Read more »

Magnin, M., Rey, M., Bastuji, H., Guillemant, P., Mauguiere, F., & Garcia-Larrea, L. (2010) Thalamic deactivation at sleep onset precedes that of the cerebral cortex in humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(8), 3829-3833. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0909710107  

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