Post List

  • January 28, 2011
  • 09:58 AM
  • 2,004 views

STS-51L Challenger Tragedy | 25 Years Today

by Michael Lombardi in a New Life in the Sea

Twenty-five years ago this very morning (at age 6) I was sitting on a tile floor in the hallway of Martin Elementary School in Seekonk, Massachusetts watching history unfold in real-time. This school assembly followed a series of classroom lessons about space - our solar system, the moon, and exploration.
As the world turns, it often takes tragedy to so well ingrain lessons to be learned, and this case was no exception. As I sat there with three classrooms worth of schoolmates, I watc........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 09:57 AM
  • 1,445 views

Teratophoneus: Utah’s Monstrous, Murderous New Tyrannosaur

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

It missed the 2010 Utah dinosaur rush by nearly a month, but a new tyrannosaur from the southern part of the beehive state makes up for its tardiness by helping to fill a gap in the famous group’s evolutionary history. Almost one year ago, paleontologists Thomas Carr and Thomas Williamson described Bistahieversor sealeyi, a tyrannosaur [...]... Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 09:39 AM
  • 2,357 views

Snow fleas: helpful winter critters

by Katie Kline in EcoTone

As the Northeast of the United States was hammered by thundersnow this week, students, parents and perhaps those working from home had the opportunity to indulge in outdoor winter activities. For many, being in the snow again is losing its luster. As an Associated Press article noted, “The Northeast has already been pummeled by winter [...]

... Read more »

LIN, F., GRAHAM, L., CAMPBELL, R., & DAVIES, P. (2007) Structural Modeling of Snow Flea Antifreeze Protein. Biophysical Journal, 92(5), 1717-1723. DOI: 10.1529/biophysj.106.093435  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 09:23 AM
  • 1,550 views

Will You Win or Lose? Getting People Tested for Diabetes

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

Do you respond better to scary messages or those telling you what you'll gain? A recent study in the UK has shown that the response is related to gender with men responding better to messages that focus on the negatives or "losses".... Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 09:09 AM
  • 1,524 views

Tiny fish light the way to fighting cancer

by Wellcome Trust in Wellcome Trust Blog

As most of us know, a cancer cell is formed when its DNA becomes altered, either by the switching on of genes which allow uncontrolled proliferation, or by the switching off of the genes which prevent this from happening. What is unknown however, is the role that the innate immune system plays in the development [...]... Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,851 views

Opiate Receptor Gene Promotes Sweet Tooth

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

Ingestive behaviour is largely governed by two biological systems: the homeostatic system involving hunger and satiety and the hedonic system involving appetite and reward.
The latter system is also involved in other hedonic behaviours ranging from alcohol and recreational drug use to other “pleasurable” activities like sex, shopping, or gambling, all of which can manifest themselves [...]... Read more »

Davis C, Zai C, Levitan RD, Kaplan AS, Carter JC, Reid-Westoby C, Curtis C, Wight K, & Kennedy JL. (2011) Opiates, overeating and obesity: a psychogenetic analysis. International journal of obesity (2005). PMID: 21266954  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,962 views

Simply Resisting Persuasion: Digressing

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve been doing our series on Simple Jury Persuasion for a while now and thought it might also be good to illustrate some of the most common ways we see people trying to resist persuasion (and then provide you ways to counter their resistance.  Researchers (and even popular writers) have studied this topic for years. [...]


No related posts.... Read more »

Jacks, J., & Cameron, K. (2003) Strategies for Resisting Persuasion. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 25(2), 145-161. DOI: 10.1207/S15324834BASP2502_5  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 06:45 AM
  • 2,111 views

scavenger or predator, the great t. rex debate

by Greg Fish in weird things

Typically, when we think of Tyrannosaurus Rex, we envision a giant killing machine with titanic jaws and huge teeth that could crunch through bones as thick as our arms and legs. Or, if you’re a fan of Jack Horner, you’re probably thinking of a five ton scavenger roaming the badlands and terrifying every smaller predator [...]... Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 06:30 AM
  • 5,737 views

Etomidate in procedural sedation

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

"Some patients, even with significant doses of medication, still continued to verbalize significant amounts of pain."

Just giving more is not always an option. Maybe there are restrictions in the protocol. Maybe the patient's vital signs change in a way that suggests that more medication is not the best idea at that time.
... Read more »

Levins T. (2011) Etomidate in procedural sedation. Air medical journal, 30(1), 45-8. PMID: 21211712  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 06:22 AM
  • 966 views

Initial Characterization of the Human Central Proteome

by avi_wener in The European Biotechnologist

A research team from the Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Lazarettgasse recently published a paper in the open access journal BMC Systems Biology characterizing what they termed “the human central proteome.” Whenever a study comes out that characterizes a “central” process, pathway, proteomic or genomic subset I am always [...]... Read more »

Thomas R Burkard, Melanie Planyavsky, Ines Kaupe, Florian P Breitwieser, Tilmann Buerckstuemmer, Keiryn L Bennett, Giulio Superti-Furga, & Jacques Colinge. (2011) Initial characterization of the human central proteome. BMC Systems Biology. info:/

  • January 28, 2011
  • 05:33 AM
  • 1,167 views

Reverse Bestiality: When Animals Commit Sexual Assault

by Christie Wilcox in Observations of a Nerd

Sexual assault is no laughing matter - unless, of course, the would-be rapist isn't human. Who doesn't giggle when they see a small dog humping someone's leg? But what many people don't realize is that reverse bestiality - where an animal makes unwanted sexual advances on a person - is a true problem for scientists working in the field where the actions of wild animals are completely unpredictable.... Read more »

Brian Bowen. (2007) Sexual Harassment By A Male Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas). Marine Turtle Newsletter, 10. info:/

  • January 28, 2011
  • 05:30 AM
  • 1,071 views

Better genomics through chemistry

by Becky in It Takes 30

There’s been a little flurry of papers from UCSF recently about using chemical and environmental perturbations to ask when and why you need the function of a particular gene.  I originally thought I might try to write about all of them at once, but no — there’s more here than I can do justice to [...]... Read more »

Nichols RJ, Sen S, Choo YJ, Beltrao P, Zietek M, Chaba R, Lee S, Kazmierczak KM, Lee KJ, Wong A.... (2011) Phenotypic landscape of a bacterial cell. Cell, 144(1), 143-56. PMID: 21185072  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 03:42 AM
  • 957 views

Are you smarter than a chimpanzee?

by Mike Braverman in ionpsych

Hollywood seems to think so. Nerds in the audience know that visiting aliens, if they speak at all, often say something flattering. “We just think you’re super. We’re here to admire you for being better than other life in every … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 02:50 AM
  • 1,172 views

Friday Weird Science: The new cure for the hiccups? Rectal stimulation

by Scicurious in Neurotic Physiology

Yeah, you heard me right. We all have various ways of attempting to get rid of the hiccups. Drinking a glass of water backward, eating a spoonfull of sugar, getting surprised or scared, holding your breath. The list goes on. But what if those DON’T WORK? What if even medications don’t work!? Wherever shall you [...]... Read more »

Odeh M, Bassan H, & Oliven A. (1990) Termination of intractable hiccups with digital rectal massage. Journal of internal medicine, 227(2), 145-6. PMID: 2299306  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 01:16 AM
  • 1,028 views

Science Online 2011: Underrepresentation hurts us all

by Kate Clancy in Context & Variation

In my second year of graduate school, I was in a study group with a few other grad students: in particular I remember a white female student and an Asian-American female student. Somehow we got on the topic of admissions, where we all admitted, jokingly, to feeling like impostors. Then the white female student stated that she didn't believe in affirmative action, and expressed her view with quite a bit of anger. "Besides," she finished, "I just don't see race."I was completely paralyzed, and fel........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 12:48 AM
  • 1,607 views

Brand Anthropology: New and Improved, with Extra Diversity!

by gregdowney in Neuroanthropology

Since graduating from high school, I’ve several times worked as a salesman, first flogging reference books door-to-door over summers while an undergraduate and later, while writing my dissertation, getting involved in the ‘design consulting’ business where I helped sell something a lot less tangible.  Sales was a great training ground for an anthropologist: nothing prepares you for quickly manufacturing social relations like slogging around door-to-door with a sample case, and a large lec........ Read more »

Hannerz, U. (2010) Diversity Is Our Business. American Anthropologist, 112(4), 539-551. DOI: 10.1111/j.1548-1433.2010.01274.x  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 12:48 AM
  • 1,383 views

Brand Anthropology: New and Improved, with Extra Diversity!

by Daniel Lende in Neuroanthropology PLoS

Since graduating from high school, I’ve several times worked as a salesman, first flogging reference books door-to-door over summers while an undergraduate and later, while writing my dissertation, getting involved in the ‘design consulting’ business where I helped sell something a lot less tangible.  Sales was a great training ground for an anthropologist: nothing prepares you for quickly manufacturing social relations like slogging around door-to-door with a sample case, and a large lec........ Read more »

Hannerz, U. (2010) Diversity Is Our Business. American Anthropologist, 112(4), 539-551. DOI: 10.1111/j.1548-1433.2010.01274.x  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 12:40 AM
  • 721 views

Hijacked. Does cocaine take control the brain?

by B.F. Hebb in ionpsych

Cocaine's effect on neurons and the brain may be more unique than previously thought.... Read more »

Barron AB, Maleszka R, Helliwell PG, & Robinson GE. (2009) Effects of cocaine on honey bee dance behaviour. The Journal of experimental biology, 212(Pt 2), 163-8. PMID: 19112134  

  • January 27, 2011
  • 11:05 PM
  • 792 views

A species by any other name...would leave us with the same problem

by zacharoo in Lawn Chair Anthropology

This is a great big week for anthropology coverage. The sequencing of the orangutan (Pongo species) genome made the cover of Nature. It's grant-writing-dissertation-formulating-prelim-studying time for me so I haven't had a chance to read this one yet. Science has a couple paleoanthropology-related stories, including two by Ann Gibbons. The first is about recent research on ancient DNA, and how this informs the debate about 'modern human' origins. But there's also a short blurb on what the eff "........ Read more »

  • January 27, 2011
  • 10:56 PM
  • 1,410 views

125 Year Old Hand Axes From Jebel Faya, UAE

by Kambiz Kamrani in Anthropology.net

Hans-Peter Uerpmann of the University of Tubingen has lead a team excavating the Jebel Faya site in the United Arab Emirates, right near the Straits of Hormuz. They’ve found 125,000 year old stone tools that look like early modern human tools … Continue reading →... Read more »

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