Post List

  • July 11, 2014
  • 04:53 AM
  • 87 views

FLCN is important for cardiomyocyte development

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

Cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive response that occurs following increased stress on the heart wall, and can be caused by strenuous exercise, hypertension, heart attack or heart valve disease. In some cases, this can lead to heart failure. Although the … Continue reading →... Read more »

Hasumi Y, Baba M, Hasumi H, Huang Y, Lang M, Reindorf R, Oh HB, Sciarretta S, Nagashima K, Haines DC.... (2014) Folliculin (Flcn) inactivation leads to murine cardiac hypertrophy through mTORC1 deregulation. Human molecular genetics. PMID: 24908670  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 04:48 AM
  • 85 views

Maternal C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and offspring schizophrenia

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A big quote to start this post: "This finding provides the most robust evidence to date that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in schizophrenia, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders".Ophelia @ Wikipedia The source for this quote was the paper by Sarah Canetta and colleagues [1] based on an analysis of serum samples from mums for C-reactive protein (CRP) as ........ Read more »

Canetta, S., Sourander, A., Surcel, H., Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, S., Leiviskä, J., Kellendonk, C., McKeague, I., & Brown, A. (2014) Elevated Maternal C-Reactive Protein and Increased Risk of Schizophrenia in a National Birth Cohort. American Journal of Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.13121579  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 01:23 AM
  • 92 views

When running, lean forward at the ankle or the hip?

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

When running, lean forward at the ankle or the hip?... Read more »

  • July 11, 2014
  • 12:15 AM
  • 85 views

Remote CPR Skills Testing Online - A Crazy Idea?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

On the MedicCast, Jamie Davis interviews Roy Shaw of SUMO about a method of remote CPR certification for health care providers.

"The Single Use Manikin Option, or SUMO™, is an AHA-compliant way of getting certified in CPR completely online.[1]"

What different ways of dealing with certification/recertification problems should we use?... Read more »

Sutton RM, Niles D, Meaney PA, Aplenc R, French B, Abella BS, Lengetti EL, Berg RA, Helfaer MA, Nadkarni V. (2011) Low-Dose, High-Frequency CPR Training Improves Skill Retention of In-Hospital Pediatric Providers. PEDIATRICS, 128(1). DOI: 10.1542/peds.2010-2105d  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 05:58 PM
  • 107 views

Sponge-Like Material Helps Li-Ion Batteries Run Longer

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed a new porous, sponge-like material that can be used as an anti-pulverization structure for high-performance lithium-ion battery anodes.... Read more »

  • July 10, 2014
  • 03:32 PM
  • 91 views

July 10, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Do your thoughts and feelings have colors? Do you feel red with rage during traffic, or green with envy when your lady swoons over Ryan Gosling? A recent methods paper introduces a very cool technique that allows the visualization and measurement of voltage within an excited neuron. Biologists build tools that are ideally accurate, fast, and non-damaging to the cells and organisms on which they are used. In a recent paper in Nature Methods, Hochbaum and colleagues describe the improved techn........ Read more »

Hochbaum, D., Zhao, Y., Farhi, S., Klapoetke, N., Werley, C., Kapoor, V., Zou, P., Kralj, J., Maclaurin, D., Smedemark-Margulies, N.... (2014) All-optical electrophysiology in mammalian neurons using engineered microbial rhodopsins. Nature Methods. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.3000  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 01:59 PM
  • 127 views

Don’t Listen to the Voices: Understanding Consciousness

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There is a voice in my head. Don't worry it's mine... I think [a story for another time I'm sure], but why is my voice inside my head? What causes me to hear myself while I type these very words, or even better you to hear them in your voice as you read them? Consciousness is a complex and very confusing thing. I think therefore I am? Science has had trouble cracking that nut and philosophy just won't cut it in the realm of neuroscience. [...]... Read more »

Paller, K., & Suzuki, S. (2014) The source of consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2014.05.012  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 12:18 PM
  • 82 views

Learning for Survival? Venom Overrides Other Snake Categories

by amikulak in Daily Observations

We deal with the world around us by putting it into categories. We are constantly trying to understand the things we encounter by classifying them: Is this a food I […]... Read more »

  • July 10, 2014
  • 11:19 AM
  • 104 views

Haha, kkkk, 555, LOL, jaja: Globalization Through Internet Jokes

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

In a recent article from Shifman, Levy and Thelwall, internet jokes are found to serve as an important and powerful agent of globalization and americanization. To research the role of internet jokes, they look at the concept of “user-generated globalization”, where internet users are the focal points through which user-generated content (in this case jokes) is translated, customized and distributed across the globe.... Read more »

Shifman, L., Levy, H., & Thelwall, M. (2014) Internet Jokes: The Secret Agents of Globalization?. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. DOI: 10.1111/jcc4.12082  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 07:17 AM
  • 118 views

Can a Failed Schizophrenia Drug Prevent PTSD?

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

In the 2000s, enthusiasm was high that a novel class of drugs would reach the market as blockbuster treatments for psychiatric disorders. These drugs act on receptors for a group of neuropeptides known as tachykinins (or neurokinins). These peptides — substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NkA), and neurokinin B (NkB) — function as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in the central nervous system, but are quite different from the usual monoamines targeted by current psychotropic medications prescr........ Read more »

  • July 10, 2014
  • 05:00 AM
  • 64 views

By treating depression, do we also treat suicidality? The answer is far from straightforward

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

By guest blogger James Coyne.Edgar Allan Poe’s fictional detective C. Auguste Dupin warns against tackling questions that are too complicated to test, but too fascinating to give up. Whether psychotherapy or medication can reduce suicidality is probably such a question. Particularly if we are really interested in whether treatments can reduce attempted suicides, not whether they change patients’ answers in an interview or on a questionnaire.There is no doubt about the clinical and publi........ Read more »

  • July 10, 2014
  • 03:34 AM
  • 97 views

Viral exposure and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A whole slew of articles published by Ivan Gentile and colleagues based at the University of Naples (Italy) brought me to writing this post looking at some of the literature on viral exposures and autism. Viruses, in case you didn't know, are some of nature's survivors, infecting host cells and reproducing, onwards hopeful of finding more (un)willing cells/organisms to infect. Humankind have developed various biological defence mechanisms against the viral (and bacterial) onslaught that we all f........ Read more »

Gentile I, Zappulo E, Bonavolta R, Maresca R, Messana T, Buonomo AR, Portella G, Sorrentino R, Settimi A, Pascotto A.... (2014) Prevalence and Titre of Antibodies to Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder. In vivo (Athens, Greece), 28(4), 621-626. PMID: 24982232  

Gentile I, Zappulo E, Bonavolta R, Maresca R, Riccio MP, Buonomo AR, Portella G, Vallefuoco L, Settimi A, Pascotto A.... (2014) Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 Antibodies in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders. In vivo (Athens, Greece), 28(4), 667-671. PMID: 24982239  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 07:33 PM
  • 87 views

The effects of the sole geometry of the On running shoe

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

The effects of the sole geometry of the On running shoe... Read more »

Knoepfli-Lenzin, C., Waech, J., Gülay, T., Schellenberg, F., & Lorenzetti, S. (2014) The influence of a new sole geometry while running. Journal of Sports Sciences, 1-9. DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2014.915421  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 03:43 PM
  • 95 views

Researchers Create Sand-Based Li-Ion Batteries

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have developed an inexpensive way to produce sand-based Li-ion batteries.... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 01:37 PM
  • 118 views

Lose Weight, Live Longer. Simple, Right?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Suprise! Really this shouldn’t come as a shock, but adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a younger age from cancer and other complications like stroke, diabetes, heart disease, […]... Read more »

Kitahara, C., Flint, A., Berrington de Gonzalez, A., Bernstein, L., Brotzman, M., MacInnis, R., Moore, S., Robien, K., Rosenberg, P., Singh, P.... (2014) Association between Class III Obesity (BMI of 40–59 kg/m2) and Mortality: A Pooled Analysis of 20 Prospective Studies. PLoS Medicine, 11(7). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001673  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 12:06 PM
  • 89 views

Brain Hippocampus Atrophy in Traumatic Brain Injury

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Understanding the specific brain regions vulnerable to traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important for assessment and intervention research.Two areas of active research include studies of brain white matter using diffusion tensor imaging and assessment of regional brain atrophy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Two recent MRI studies have suggested the brain hippocampus may be a region of vulnerability to TBI.A Canadian study by Robin Green and colleagues used brain MRI to examine a cohort of........ Read more »

Green RE, Colella B, Maller JJ, Bayley M, Glazer J, & Mikulis DJ. (2014) Scale and pattern of atrophy in the chronic stages of moderate-severe TBI. Frontiers in human neuroscience, 67. PMID: 24744712  

Singh R, Meier TB, Kuplicki R, Savitz J, Mukai I, Cavanagh L, Allen T, Teague TK, Nerio C, Polanski D.... (2014) Relationship of collegiate football experience and concussion with hippocampal volume and cognitive outcomes. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 311(18), 1883-8. PMID: 24825643  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 12:05 PM
  • 117 views

You can do it! Self-talk is more effective when you refer to yourself as You, rather than I

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

We know self-talk can help people's self-control (e.g. "Don't do it!"), and boost their morale (e.g. "Hang in there!") in sporting situations. However, before now, no-one has investigated whether self-talk is more effective depending on whether you refer to yourself in the grammatical first person (i.e. "I can do it!") or the second person (i.e. "You can do it?").Sanda Dolcos and her team first asked 95 psychology undergrads to imagine they were a character in a short story. The charac........ Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:32 AM
  • 89 views

TCAS AS PAINKILLERS: PROOF THAT YOU CAN TEACH AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS

by Emily Lawson in Antisense Science

The creation of a new drug that is safer, more effective, and has fewer side effects than the current treatment surely renders the current treatment obsolete, right? Well, not necessarily.

Take tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) for instance. TCAs are a class of antidepressant that work by blocking the serotonin and noradrenaline transporters, leading to an increase in the amount of serotonin and noradrenaline in the synapse. As the current theory says that depression is caused by low levels of........ Read more »

Sindrup, S., Otto, M., Finnerup, N., & Jensen, T. (2005) Antidepressants in the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain. Basic Clinical Pharmacology Toxicology, 96(6), 399-409. DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-7843.2005.pto_96696601.x  

Bohren Y, Tessier LH, Megat S, Petitjean H, Hugel S, Daniel D, Kremer M, Fournel S, Hein L, Schlichter R.... (2013) Antidepressants suppress neuropathic pain by a peripheral β2-adrenoceptor mediated anti-TNFα mechanism. Neurobiology of disease, 39-50. PMID: 23978467  

Micó JA, Ardid D, Berrocoso E, & Eschalier A. (2006) Antidepressants and pain. Trends in pharmacological sciences, 27(7), 348-54. PMID: 16762426  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:19 AM
  • 98 views

Say No to Nocebo: How Doctors Can Keep Patients’ Minds from Making Them Sicker

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

“First, do no harm,” the saying goes, but that might be close to impossible. Just as our expectations can make us feel better, they can also make us feel much worse. This means that how doctors phrase their instructions or introduce new drugs may have a real impact on our health. But some doctors are […]The post Say No to Nocebo: How Doctors Can Keep Patients’ Minds from Making Them Sicker appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:00 AM
  • 31 views

Chimp Talk

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Learn how to speak chimp with the newly translated language of chimpanzee gestures in non-play context.... Read more »

Hobaiter C, & Byrne RW. (2014) The Meanings of Chimpanzee Gestures. Current biology : CB. PMID: 24998524  

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