Post List

  • June 6, 2016
  • 11:50 AM
  • 185 views

Neuroscience Medicine: The Time Has Come

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

As basic and clinical sciences advance, it becomes increasing important to understand the role of multidisciplinary efforts in scientific progress. In this post, I propose rethinking and renaming the medically-related neuroscience disciplines into a new specialty called neuroscience medicine.Basic neuroscience research has evolved and emerged as a powerful discipline due to the increasing use of multidisciplinary research teams. Basic neuroscience involves collaboration of various scientifi........ Read more »

  • June 6, 2016
  • 11:30 AM
  • 200 views

The Pantanal Diaries IV: Not Ready To Leave

by Chiara Civardi in United Academics

Venture into the Brazilian swamp with Chiara and the Wildlife Conservation Society.... Read more »

Barros, E., Pashanasi, B., Constantino, R., & Lavelle, P. (2002) Effects of land-use system on the soil macrofauna in western Brazilian Amazonia. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 35(5), 338-347. DOI: 10.1007/s00374-002-0479-z  

  • June 6, 2016
  • 11:08 AM
  • 170 views

Best Laid Plans

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

REVEALED: UK cancer scientists' pensions invested in tobacco.

....And this UK cancer scientist, for one, is Not Happy....... Read more »

AG McCluskey. (2016) Best Laid Plans. Zongo's Cancer Diaries. info:/

  • June 6, 2016
  • 10:34 AM
  • 184 views

Burning seaweed to make glass and avoid a lumpy neck

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Seaweed is one of those tricky biological groups, as membership isn't just about being a close relative. It typically includes plant-like organisms found among several types of algae - green, brown, and red - and depending on who you're talking to also includes masses of cyanobacteria (which are distant relatives of algae). Functionally, all seaweeds enjoy growing in salty water and use the sun to manufacture sugary meals for themselves. Their need for sun means they are found in sunlit coastal ........ Read more »

  • June 6, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 104 views

Acetaminophen: Or why you have to read more than the  headlines when it comes to research

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

John Oliver recently took on mass media coverage of scientific findings on his HBO show, Last Week Tonight. The result is a searing video mocking the distortions and misinterpretations (and even flat-out lies) about research findings as presented in mass media. Since his episode aired (a link to the video is at the end of […]

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Pew Research says 15% of Ame........ Read more »

  • June 6, 2016
  • 06:04 AM
  • 96 views

How depression affects couples – in their own words

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Depression has been called a "we-disease" because when the dark clouds arrive, it's not just the depressed person who is affected, but all those close to them. A new study in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationship explored these spillover effects in the context of romantic couples, where one or both individuals have a diagnosis of clinical depression. The US study broke new ground by asking both partners in each couple to provide their perspective on how depression had affected their re........ Read more »

Sharabi, L., Delaney, A., & Knobloch, L. (2015) In their own words: How clinical depression affects romantic relationships. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 33(4), 421-448. DOI: 10.1177/0265407515578820  

  • June 6, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 161 views

Many NCAA Clinicians Fail to Screen Mental Health

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Only 39% of respondents from NCAA institutions indicated that they had a written mental health screening plan. There is a wide variability between mental health screening practices among NCAA institutions.... Read more »

  • June 6, 2016
  • 03:00 AM
  • 189 views

C-reactive protein "may be a causal risk factor for schizophrenia"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Although the public perception of science is that researchers go around 'proving' or 'disproving' that A leads to B or X causes Y, it is still surprisingly rare to see the word 'causal' in many areas of peer-reviewed research. Aside from the fact that science generally works around the concept of 'probability' - producing data pertinent to discussions on whether something is more or less likely to be true/false - most science is not so forthright in its conclusions. Certainly science covering th........ Read more »

Inoshita M, Numata S, Tajima A, Kinoshita M, Umehara H, Nakataki M, Ikeda M, Maruyama S, Yamamori H, Kanazawa T.... (2016) A significant causal association between C-reactive protein levels and schizophrenia. Scientific reports, 26105. PMID: 27193331  

  • June 5, 2016
  • 02:03 PM
  • 169 views

Counting exosome secretion

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

Last month I wrote a post about exosome internalization by recipient cells.  One of the topics I discussed was the lack of good quantitative data in the exosomal field, and what the current data tells us about the efficiency and … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • June 5, 2016
  • 01:05 AM
  • 230 views

Why does English spread in global academia?

by Jinhyun Cho in Language on the Move

The Linguistic Ethnography Forum’s e-seminar devoted to Ingrid Piller’s recent book Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice: An Introduction to Applied...... Read more »

Piller, I., & Cho, J. (2013) Neoliberalism as language policy. Language in Society, 42(01), 23-44. DOI: 10.1017/S0047404512000887  

  • June 4, 2016
  • 07:40 PM
  • 170 views

Trauma research must be Open Access

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

We recently examined how global and how open the literature on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder is.

Not so global, and not so open.

Only 13% of the publications of 2012 regarded samples in low- or middle-income countries and 58% were behind a paywall.

It worries me that practicing psychologists can’t access the latest research on therapy effectiveness...
... Read more »

  • June 4, 2016
  • 03:40 AM
  • 198 views

Antibiotic brain part 2

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Mouse study finds link between gut bacteria and neurogenesis" went the press release accompanying the paper by Luisa Möhle and colleagues [1] (open-access). Describing the results of a mouse study - that's MOUSE study - researchers reported that "treatment of adult mice with antibiotics decreases hippocampal neurogenesis and memory retention."The antibiotic mix used on study mice was quite an aggressive one: "ampicillin plus sulbactam (1.5 g/l; Pfizer), vancomycin (500 mg/l; Cell Pharm), ........ Read more »

Luisa Möhle, Daniele Mattei, Markus M. Heimesaat, Stefan Bereswill, André Fischer, Marie Alutis, Timothy French, Dolores Hambardzumyan, Polly Matzinger, Ildiko R. Dunay.... (2016) Ly6Chi Monocytes Provide a Link between Antibiotic-Induced Changes in Gut Microbiota and Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis. Cell Reports. info:/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.04.074

  • June 3, 2016
  • 02:55 PM
  • 252 views

Zika virus directly infects brain cells and evades immune system detection

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The mosquito-borne Zika virus linked to microcephaly and other neurological problems in newborns of affected mothers directly infects the brain progenitor cells destined to become neurons. The team of researchers used a strain of Zika currently impacting the Americas, and found that the virus infects about 20 percent of cells on average, evades immune system detection, and continues to replicate for weeks.

... Read more »

  • June 3, 2016
  • 01:42 PM
  • 137 views

The Myth of the Optimism Bias?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Are humans natural, irrational optimists? According to many psychologists, humans show a fundamental optimism bias, a tendency to underestimate our chances of suffering negative events. It's said that when thinking about harmful events, such as contracting cancer, most people believe that their risk is lower than that of 'the average person'. So, on average, people rate themselves as safer than the average. Moreover, people are also said to show biased belief updating. Faced with evidence that t........ Read more »

Punit Shah, Adam J. L. Harris, Geoffrey Bird, Caroline Catmur, & Ulrike Hahn. (2016) A Pessimistic View of Optimistic Belief Updating. Cognitive Psychology. info:/

  • June 3, 2016
  • 11:43 AM
  • 250 views

Anonymising and sharing patient data

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Patient data is extremely valuable for biomedical and healthcare research. Collecting and sharing patient data globally can lead to several benefits such as better understanding diseases, identifying patterns in public health and disease, developing and monotoring drugs and treatments, allowing researchers to build on the work of others efficiently and finding suitable candidates to take part in clinical trials. However, concerns about privacy have been a barrier for making patient data availabl........ Read more »

El Emam K, Rodgers S, & Malin B. (2015) Anonymising and sharing individual patient data. BMJ (Clinical research ed.). PMID: 25794882  

  • June 3, 2016
  • 06:51 AM
  • 166 views

When do girls and boys start preferring gender-stereotypical toys?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Do boys prefer playing with trucks and balls, while girls prefer dolls, because they are socialised from an early age to play this way, or do their play habits reflect innate differences in interests between the sexes? In a world where there are major gender imbalances in participation in science, sport, politics and other areas, this is a controversial question. Evidence for very early sex differences in toy interests could arguably support the idea that the sexes are directed down different ca........ Read more »

  • June 3, 2016
  • 04:56 AM
  • 193 views

The effects of acute exercise on ME/CFS/SEID meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Accepting that the science recipe that is a meta-analysis is only as good as the research ingredients that go into it, I was interested to see the results published by Bryan Loy and colleagues [1] who concluded that: "preliminary evidence indicates that acute exercise increases fatigue in people with ME/CFS/SEID more than in control groups, but effects were heterogeneous between studies."ME - myalgic encephalomyelitis - and CFS - chronic fatigue syndrome - are conditions that I'm interested........ Read more »

  • June 2, 2016
  • 11:45 PM
  • 250 views

Systemic change, effective altruism and philanthropy

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

The topics of effective altruism and social (in)justice have weighed heavy on my mind for several years. I’ve even touched on the latter occasionally on TheEGG, but usually in specific domains closer to my expertise, such as in my post on the ethics of big data. Recently, I started reading more thoroughly about effective altruism. […]... Read more »

Falk, A., & Szech, N. (2013) Morals and Markets. Science, 340(6133), 707-711. DOI: 10.1126/science.1231566  

  • June 2, 2016
  • 06:30 PM
  • 178 views

Imprinting in Birds, and Why We’re Freaked Out by Robots

by Emily Makowski in Sextraordinary!

I discuss a recent article on imprinting in chicks and how it relates to the human perception of biological motion.... Read more »

Momoko Miura, & Toshiya Matsushima. (2016) Biological motion facilitates filial imprinting. Animal Behaviour, 171-180. info:/doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.03.025

  • June 2, 2016
  • 12:11 PM
  • 216 views

The Future of Neuroscience Education

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

I spent the majority of my career in medical education and saw significant changes over time.One encouraging sign was the emergence of neuroscience as a respected and beneficial academic discipline.Now, a new perspective on Neuroscience Training for the 21st Center has been written by Huda Akil and colleagues. This perspective is recently published in the journal Neuron with free access to the full-text manuscript.Here are my notes from reading this perspective. Readers can access the free full-........ Read more »

Akil, H., Balice-Gordon, R., Cardozo, D., Koroshetz, W., Posey Norris, S., Sherer, T., Sherman, S., & Thiels, E. (2016) Neuroscience Training for the 21st Century. Neuron, 90(5), 917-926. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2016.05.030  

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