Post List

  • January 17, 2016
  • 08:58 PM
  • 109 views

Spreading climate misinformation like butter

by dominicwhite in Two Degrees or Under

A new study in PNAS concludes that echo chambers and confirmation bias spread misinformation. The authors “readable summary”: The wide availability of user-provided content in online social media facilitates the aggregation of people around common interests, worldviews, and narratives. However,...... Read more »

Del Vicario, M., Bessi, A., Zollo, F., Petroni, F., Scala, A., Caldarelli, G., Stanley, H., & Quattrociocchi, W. (2016) The spreading of misinformation online. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201517441. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1517441113  

  • January 17, 2016
  • 02:37 PM
  • 38 views

Little Brown Bat

by Jason Organ in Eatlemania!

The Eatles have recently polished off the soft tissue remains of a little brown bat. Come read about this fascinating animal.... Read more »

Dzal YA, & Brigham RM. (2013) The tradeoff between torpor use and reproduction in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus). Journal of comparative physiology. B, Biochemical, systemic, and environmental physiology, 183(2), 279-88. PMID: 22972361  

Fenton, M., & Barclay, R. (1980) Myotis lucifugus. Mammalian Species, 1. DOI: 10.2307/3503792  

Veselka, N., McGuire, L., Dzal, Y., Hooton, L., & Fenton, M. (2013) Spatial variation in the echolocation calls of the little brown bat ( ) . Canadian Journal of Zoology, 91(11), 795-801. DOI: 10.1139/cjz-2013-0094  

  • January 17, 2016
  • 02:31 PM
  • 138 views

Nanodevice, build thyself

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

As we continue to shrink electronic components, top-down manufacturing methods begin to approach a physical limit at the nanoscale. Rather than continue to chip away at this limit, one solution of interest involves using the bottom-up self-assembly of molecular building blocks to build nanoscale devices.

... Read more »

  • January 17, 2016
  • 10:00 AM
  • 178 views

Week Two In Review: Open-Access Science | 11 to 17 Jan

by TakFurTheKaffe in Tak Fur The Kaffe

The world’s largest canyon discovered hidden under the Antarctic ice, citizen science is on the up, new genetic secrets of Ötzi Iceman, and the social lives of chimps. Here are 5 of the latest scientific studies published open-access this week.... Read more »

Jamieson, S., Ross, N., Greenbaum, J., Young, D., Aitken, A., Roberts, J., Blankenship, D., Bo, S., & Siegert, M. (2015) An extensive subglacial lake and canyon system in Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica. Geology. DOI: 10.1130/G37220.1  

Moeller, A., Foerster, S., Wilson, M., Pusey, A., Hahn, B., & Ochman, H. (2016) Social behavior shapes the chimpanzee pan-microbiome. Science Advances, 2(1). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1500997  

Coia, V., Cipollini, G., Anagnostou, P., Maixner, F., Battaggia, C., Brisighelli, F., Gómez-Carballa, A., Destro Bisol, G., Salas, A., & Zink, A. (2016) Whole mitochondrial DNA sequencing in Alpine populations and the genetic history of the Neolithic Tyrolean Iceman. Scientific Reports, 18932. DOI: 10.1038/srep18932  

Engelmann, J., & Herrmann, E. (2016) Chimpanzees Trust Their Friends. Current Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.11.037  

  • January 17, 2016
  • 09:04 AM
  • 152 views

A Neural Response to "Trigger" Stimuli in PTSD?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A new paper in the prestigious Journal of Neuroscience makes some exciting claims about the neurobiology of PTSD - but are the methods solid?



Canadian researchers Mišić et al. used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure neural activity in four groups: traumatized Canadian soldiers, non-traumatized soldiers, civilians with mild traumatic brain injury, and healthy civilians. They found that
Soldiers with PTSD display inter-regional hypersynchrony at high frequencies (80–150 Hz), as well a... Read more »

Mišić B, Dunkley BT, Sedge PA, Da Costa L, Fatima Z, Berman MG, Doesburg SM, McIntosh AR, Grodecki R, Jetly R.... (2016) Post-Traumatic Stress Constrains the Dynamic Repertoire of Neural Activity. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 36(2), 419-31. PMID: 26758834  

  • January 17, 2016
  • 08:00 AM
  • 122 views

The blacker the better… especially in Chernobyl

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll We all know that plants use chlorophyll and other pigments to harvest energy from light and store it in synthesized molecules, a phenomenon called photosynthesis. It’s chlorophyll that makes plants (all well as some bacteria and … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 16, 2016
  • 11:30 PM
  • 176 views

Perplexity Is Not Required for Learning

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Taken at face value, the relative lack of effect of such conflicts across a broad range of studies falsifies the cognitive conflict hypothesis: The difficulty of conceptual change must reside elsewhere than in conflict, or rather the lack thereof, between misconceptions and normatively correct subject matter.... Read more »

Ramsburg, J., & Ohlsson, S. (2016) Category change in the absence of cognitive conflict. Journal of Educational Psychology, 108(1), 98-113. DOI: 10.1037/edu0000050  

  • January 16, 2016
  • 06:54 PM
  • 135 views

Beyoncé, Pitbull, Feature Alcohol in Music Videos Aimed at Young People

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Alcohol on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Joanne Cranwell PhD, CPsychol The UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies  School of Medicine Division of Epidemiology & Public Health Clinical Sciences Building University of Nottingham MedicalResearch: What is the … Continue reading →
The post Beyoncé, Pitbull, Feature Alcohol in Music Videos Aimed at Young People appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dr Joanne Cranwell. (2016) Beyoncé, Pitbull, Feature Alcohol in Music Videos Aimed at Young People. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 16, 2016
  • 06:48 PM
  • 162 views

Brain-Based Signatures May Help Optimize Anesthesia Dose

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Anesthesiology on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Srivas Chennu, PhD Senior Research Associate Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge Visiting Scientist, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit College Research Associate, Homerton College Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post Brain-Based Signatures May Help Optimize Anesthesia Dose appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Srivas Chennu, PhD. (2016) Brain-Based Signatures May Help Optimize Anesthesia Dose. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 16, 2016
  • 06:39 PM
  • 159 views

Dietary Nitrates From Green Leafy Vegetables Linked To Decreased Glaucoma Risk

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Ophthalmology on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jae Hee Kang, MSc, SC Associate Epidemiologist, Brigham and Women’s Hospital Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School Brigham and Women’s Hospital Department of Medicine Channing Division of Network Medicine Boston, MA … Continue reading →
The post Dietary Nitrates From Green Leafy Vegetables Linked To Decreased Glaucoma Risk appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Jae Hee Kang, MSc, SC. (2015) Dietary Nitrates From Green Leafy Vegetables Linked To Decreased Glaucoma Risk. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 16, 2016
  • 06:23 PM
  • 145 views

Functional Genomics Identifies Genes Essential To Breast Cancer Cell Survival

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Breast Cancer Research on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Benjamin Neel MD PhD Professor, Department of Medicine Director Perlmutter Cancer Center Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Neel:  Over … Continue reading →
The post Functional Genomics Identifies Genes Essential To Breast Cancer Cell Survival appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dr. Benjamin Neel MD PhD. (2016) Functional Genomics Identifies Genes Essential To Breast Cancer Cell Survival. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 16, 2016
  • 06:22 PM
  • 139 views

Damm(n)ing the Amazon

by dominicwhite in Two Degrees or Under

From the abstract of a recent Science paper: The world’s most biodiverse river basins—the Amazon, Congo, and Mekong—are experiencing an unprecedented boom in construction of hydropower dams. These projects address important energy needs, but advocates often overestimate economic benefits and...... Read more »

Winemiller, K., McIntyre, P., Castello, L., Fluet-Chouinard, E., Giarrizzo, T., Nam, S., Baird, I., Darwall, W., Lujan, N., Harrison, I.... (2016) Balancing hydropower and biodiversity in the Amazon, Congo, and Mekong. Science, 351(6269), 128-129. DOI: 10.1126/science.aac7082  

  • January 16, 2016
  • 03:12 PM
  • 179 views

‘Space Warps’ and other citizen science projects reap major dividends for astrophysics

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Thanks to the Internet, amateur volunteers known as "citizen scientists" can readily donate their time and effort to science--in fields ranging from medicine to zoology to astrophysics. The astrophysics project Space Warps offers a compelling example of why citizen science has become such a popular tool and how valuable it can be.

... Read more »

Marshall, P., Verma, A., More, A., Davis, C., More, S., Kapadia, A., Parrish, M., Snyder, C., Wilcox, J., Baeten, E.... (2015) SPACE WARPS - I. Crowdsourcing the discovery of gravitational lenses. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 455(2), 1171-1190. DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stv2009  

More, A., Verma, A., Marshall, P., More, S., Baeten, E., Wilcox, J., Macmillan, C., Cornen, C., Kapadia, A., Parrish, M.... (2015) SPACE WARPS- II. New gravitational lens candidates from the CFHTLS discovered through citizen science. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 455(2), 1191-1210. DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stv1965  

  • January 16, 2016
  • 11:27 AM
  • 177 views

A student can learn better while standing

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Attention, thinking, and learning ability of students increase with standing position.

Published in:

International Journal of Environmental and Public Health

Study Further:

Researchers worked with about 300 children in second through fourth grade. They found that giving students standing desks can help them in paying more attention in class as compared to seated students. Researchers determined the engagement level by on-task behaviors such as participating in active d........ Read more »

Dornhecker, M., Blake, J., Benden, M., Zhao, H., & Wendel, M. (2015) The effect of stand-biased desks on academic engagement: an exploratory study. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 53(5), 271-280. DOI: 10.1080/14635240.2015.1029641  

  • January 16, 2016
  • 08:29 AM
  • 130 views

Sources of Error: Epiphenomenalism (part 2)

by Sergio Graziosi in Writing my own user manual - Sergio Graziosi's Blog

Epiphenomena haunt me: the actual idea that we can explain any phenomena with the aid of the concept is thoroughly alien to me. In turn, this means that I don’t understand why people do rely on the concept, and consequently…Read more ›... Read more »

Robinson, W. (2012) Phenomenal Realist Physicalism Implies Coherency of Epiphenomenalist Meaning. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 19(3-4), 145-163. info:/

  • January 16, 2016
  • 06:37 AM
  • 127 views

Genetic Testing for Autism as an Existential Question

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A special issue of the journal Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics features perspectives from various people who have experience with genetic testing. Many of the articles look interesting - with titles such as I Had Genetic Testing for Alzheimer's Disease Without My Consent. But my attention was drawn to one piece in particular, called A Sister, a Father and a Son: Autism, Genetic Testing, and Impossible Decisions. The author of the article has chosen to remain anonymous.

The piece recounts how o... Read more »

  • January 16, 2016
  • 05:28 AM
  • 168 views

Vitamin D and cognitive function (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Today I'd like to draw your attention to the paper by Natasja van Schoor and colleagues [1] and some further potential support for the idea that vitamin D levels might have some important connections to cognitive functioning.I've tackled this subject before on this blog (see here) and specifically the idea that functional vitamin D levels below a certain point might 'correlate' with poorer cognitive functioning. This time around van Schoor et al report findings based on data ........ Read more »

  • January 15, 2016
  • 06:48 PM
  • 139 views

Researchers Developing Nano Bubbles To Deliver Chemotherapy To Tumors

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Cancer Research on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Elena V. Batrakova, Ph.D. Associate Professor Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics Eshelman School of Pharmacy University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC  Medical … Continue reading →
The post Researchers Developing Nano Bubbles To Deliver Chemotherapy To Tumors appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Elena V. Batrakova, Ph.D. (2016) Researchers Developing Nano Bubbles To Deliver Chemotherapy To Tumors. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 15, 2016
  • 05:53 PM
  • 115 views

CT Scans Reveal Black-White Differences in Cardiac Morphology

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Heart Disease on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: John Nance, MD Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, South Carolina  Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What … Continue reading →
The post CT Scans Reveal Black-White Differences in Cardiac Morphology appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

John Nance, MD. (2016) CT Scans Reveal Black-White Differences in Cardiac Morphology. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 15, 2016
  • 04:38 PM
  • 131 views

Metformin May Inhibit Progression of Pancreatic Cancer In Obese Patients

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Pancreatic Cancer on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dai Fukumura, M.D., Ph.D. Joao Incio, M.D. and Rakesh K. Jain, Ph.D Edwin L. Steele Laboratory Department of Radiation Oncology Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School Medical Research: What is the … Continue reading →
The post Metformin May Inhibit Progression of Pancreatic Cancer In Obese Patients appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dai Fukumura, M.D., Ph.D. (2016) Metformin May Inhibit Progression of Pancreatic Cancer In Obese Patients. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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