Post List

  • November 24, 2014
  • 03:26 PM
  • 41 views

Hiding cells to prevent HIV transmission

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

The fight against HIV is ongoing and despite our rapid progression against the disease we still lack a cure or even adequate treatment for people infected. However, new research suggests that cloaking immune cells with antibodies that block T cell trafficking to the gut can substantially reduce the risk of viral transmission, at least in a non-human primate model of HIV infection. If it works out, this could help slow down the spread of HIV and give people a better shot at a normal life.... Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 50 views

Thin-slicing infidelity: Brief observation can reveal more than you ever thought!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Our clients are routinely stunned by the accuracy of  mock juror impressions of witnesses and parties based on a 6 to 8 minute video clip from depositions. Mock jurors quickly assess character and are often eager to share their insights. Their comments can be insightful, surprising, and sometimes biting in their judgments. So, okay. It’s […]

Related posts:
Unfaithful partner? Would you rather be seen as mature– or as competent and strong?
A law firm’s financial success & the ........ Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 05:15 AM
  • 47 views

Helicobacter pylori and stem cells in the gastric crypt

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Last Friday, the 4th Integrated Mathematical Oncology Workshop finished here at Moffitt. The event drew a variety of internal and external participants — you can see a blurry photo of many of them above — and was structured as a competition between four teams specializing in four different domains: Microbiome, Hepatitis C, Human papillomavirus, and […]... Read more »

Houghton, J., Stoicov, C., Nomura, S., Rogers, A.B., Carlson, J., Li, H., Cai, X., Fox, J.G., Goldenring, J.R., & Wang, T.C. (2004) Gastric cancer originating from bone marrow-derived cells. Science, 306(5701), 1568-71. PMID: 15567866  

  • November 24, 2014
  • 05:00 AM
  • 45 views

Removable functional appliances do not change skeletal pattern to a clinically meaningful amount

by Kevin OBrien in Kevin OBrien's Orthodontic Blog

Functional appliances do not influence skeletal pattern… This post is on functional appliances, which is an area that I have covered several times. A few postings ago I mentioned that the journals are publishing more and more systematic reviews. I also made the point in a previous post, that we need to critically read these […]
The post Removable functional appliances do not change skeletal pattern to a clinically meaningful amount appeared first on Kevin O'Brien's Orthodon........ Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 04:29 AM
  • 44 views

Finland, parental migration and offspring Asperger syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quote from the paper by Venla Lehti and colleagues [1] to start things off: "The study showed that children whose parents are both immigrants have a significantly lower likelihood of being diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome than those with two Finnish parents."Can I cook, or can't I?Based on an analysis of data derived from "the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register" and "the Finnish Medical Birth Register", researchers looked at the records of children with a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome (AS)........ Read more »

Lehti V, Cheslack-Postava K, Gissler M, Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki S, Brown AS, & Sourander A. (2014) Parental migration and Asperger's syndrome. European child . PMID: 25381114  

  • November 24, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 42 views

Experiences With Workplace Bullying Among Athletic Trainers in the Collegiate Setting

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Among athletic trainers working in a college setting 14% reported that they were bullied, and 20% reported that they witnessed bullying. There were no differences between who experienced bullying, but most of the bullying perpetrators were males with the majority being coaches.... Read more »

  • November 23, 2014
  • 11:49 PM
  • 24 views

Do you play disc-golf? Did you ever consider your environmental impact?

by Ashley D in The Average Visitor

Back when I lived in Wisconsin, one of my closest friends was the physical education teacher at the school I worked at. At some point during our friendship he invited me to play “disc-golf” with him one day after school.  At the time I had absolutely no clue what he was asking me to do […]... Read more »

Yu-Fai Leung, Chelsey Walden-Schreiner, Craig Matisoff, Michael Naber, & . (2010) A two-pronged approach to evaluating environmental concerns of disc golf as emerging recreation in urban natural areas. Managing Leisure, 18(4). info:/

  • November 23, 2014
  • 02:09 PM
  • 74 views

Love, it’s in your genes

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Most kids worry about passing tests, winning games, lost phones, fractured bones—and whether or not they will ever really fall in love. While the first few things are of relatively low value in the scientific pursuit, three Chinese researchers have focused on that last question. All in a bid to find out some of the more interesting questions about our genes: Why do some students stay single? What factors determine if a young adult falls in love?... Read more »

  • November 23, 2014
  • 10:52 AM
  • 41 views

Ampulex compressa: The Wasp That Turns Cockroaches Into Zombies

by beredim in Strange Animals

Jewel WaspBy Muhammad Mahdi Karim (Own work) [GFDL 1.2], via Wikimedia CommonsKingdom: AnimaliaPhylum: ArthropodaClass: InsectaOrder: HymenopteraSuborder: ApocritaSuperfamily: ApoideaFamily: AmpulicidaeGenus: AmpulexSpecies: Ampulex compressaCommon Name(s): Emerald cockroach wasp or jewel waspThe Emerald cockroach wasp is best known for its unusual parasitoid reproductive behavior, which among other includes stinging and injecting a cockroach with mind controlling toxins and using its ........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2014
  • 03:01 PM
  • 43 views

Habitual Facebook Users: Suckers for Social Media Scams?

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

A new study finds that habitual use of Facebook makes individuals susceptible to social media phishing attacks by criminals, likely because they automatically respond to requests without considering how they are connected with those sending the requests, how long they have known them, or who else is connected with them.

Predictors of habitual use of Facebook include frequent interactions with the platform, a large number of friend connections, and individuals’ inability to regulate thei........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2014
  • 02:45 PM
  • 55 views

Mental Health- The invisible barrier for women’s care

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

A while back I wrote a post about mental health and jail sentences, it seems like no one takes mental health seriously and that leads to lack of care for the individual. Well a new study offers even more bad news on the mental health front. Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings – Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams – than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical com........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2014
  • 10:32 AM
  • 62 views

Hammerhead Slug: World's Largest Flatworm

by beredim in Strange Animals

Bipalium kewenseNotice the distinctive hammer-like headBy Ajaykuyiloor (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia CommonsKingdom: AnimaliaPhylum: PlatyhelminthesClass: TurbellariaOrder: TricladidaSuborder: ContinenticolaFamily: GeoplanidaeSubfamily: BipaliinaeGenus: BipaliumSpecies: Bipalium kewenseCommon Names: Hammerhead slug, Greenhouse PlanarianNicknamed as the "hammerhead slug" due to its half-moon shaped head, Bipalium kewense is not your ev........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2014
  • 09:10 AM
  • 87 views

Science Identifies The Catchiest Songs Ever – Did Your Favorite Make The List?

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Using science, researchers are studying what makes songs catchy as a way to understand learning and memory. Did your favorite song make the list? ... Read more »

  • November 22, 2014
  • 08:28 AM
  • 67 views

Learning the right information with wrong guess

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Guessing even the wrong answer could help in learning the right answer.

Published in:

Memory & Cognition

Study Further:

Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, worked on some volunteers and gave them some pairs of words. Some participants were given the word pairs to study, and others were asked to guess the pairs of words before showing the right answer. Researchers found that guessing process, even when it is wrong, helps in better learning of wor........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2014
  • 03:26 AM
  • 55 views

Children as research participants: assessing competence

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I was brought to writing about this topic after reading an interesting post by Virginia Hughes titled: Personhood Week: Do Kids Count? Among the various points raised in that article was some discussion about minors having medical autonomy and how this might impinge on areas outside of just medical decision-making. It also reminded me about something which was raised on more than one occasion when I undertook a stint on a University Ethics committee...Most people involved in the medica........ Read more »

  • November 21, 2014
  • 06:39 PM
  • 74 views

Dogtober = Canine science in October

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

What a BOOMING month for dogs and science October was! We've captured the links to all the latest blogs, research and news that caught out attention throughout Dog-tober.Thanks to Storify (click here if the you can't see the collection of links below) you can make sure you didn't miss out too.[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [01-31 October 2014]" on Storify] Further reading:Bradshaw J.W.S. & Nicola J. Rooney (2014). Why do adult dogs ‘play’?, Behavioural Processes, DOI: http:/........ Read more »

Bozkurt Alper, Barbara Sherman, Rita Brugarolas, Sean Mealin, John Majikes, Pu Yang, & Robert Loftin. (2014) Towards Cyber-Enhanced Working Dogs for Search and Rescue. IEEE Intelligent Systems, 1-1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/mis.2014.77  

  • November 21, 2014
  • 04:54 PM
  • 65 views

The impact of powered prosthetic failures on the user

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Prosthetics have come a long way in a relatively short amount of time. With the ongoing wars in the middle east the need for better prosthetics technologies has become more apparent, to this end we now have prosthetics that will allow a person to "feel", we even have motorized prosthetics that will help allow a more fluid walk, but while powered lower limb prosthetics hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall. Becau........ Read more »

  • November 21, 2014
  • 04:09 PM
  • 61 views

EPA Clean Power Plan Explained!

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

The EPA announced a plan to cut power plant emissions by 30% in about 15 years - get the details here!... Read more »

Fowlie, M., Goulder, L., Kotchen, M., Borenstein, S., Bushnell, J., Davis, L., Greenstone, M., Kolstad, C., Knittel, C., Stavins, R.... (2014) An economic perspective on the EPA's Clean Power Plan. Science, 346(6211), 815-816. DOI: 10.1126/science.1261349  

  • November 21, 2014
  • 03:54 PM
  • 75 views

Is depression an infectious disease?

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Over the past several decades we have seen the advent of a number of new pharmaceutical drugs to treat depression, but major depressive disorder remains one of the most common mood disorders in the United States; over 15% of the population will suffer from major depressive disorder at some point in their lives. Despite extensive research into the etiology and treatment of depression, we haven't seen a mitigation of the impact depression has on our society. In fact, there have even been a lot of ........ Read more »

  • November 21, 2014
  • 03:02 PM
  • 55 views

Injecting a Placebo to Run Faster!

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Injecting a Placebo to Run Faster!... Read more »

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