Post List

  • October 9, 2014
  • 11:07 PM
  • 126 views

Gaining a Green Thumb for Grassroots Language Activism

by Alexandra Grey in Language on the Move

I was surprised, frankly, during my recent fieldwork to find Zhuang language being used in a QQ chatroom in China. Surprised because Zhuang text is absent from the linguistic landscape. Surprised because many of my interview participants reported they had … Continue reading →... Read more »

Cru, Josep. (2014) Language Revitalisation from the Ground Up: Promoting Yucatec Maya on Facebook. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 1-13. info:/10.1080/01434632.2014.921184

  • October 9, 2014
  • 10:15 PM
  • 113 views

Ecology of cancer: mimicry, eco-engineers, morphostats, and nutrition

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

One of my favorite parts of mathematical modeling is the opportunities it provides to carefully explore metaphors and analogies between disciplines. The connection most carefully explored at the MBI Workshop on the Ecology and Evolution of Cancer was, as you can guess from the name, between ecology and oncology. Looking at cancer from the perspective […]... Read more »

  • October 9, 2014
  • 09:50 PM
  • 137 views

Fluoridation, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Water

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Most of us have heard the famous line by General Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove, "have you ever seen a Commie drink a glass of water?" The conversation thereafter satirically illustrated a fear that grew most prominent starting in the 1940s with the Second Red Scare -- public water fluoridation. Many conspiracy theories about water fluoridation arose during this time, but they all aimed to make the same case: that fluoride in drinking water is bad (sometimes just meaning unethical),........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2014
  • 08:28 PM
  • 67 views

Random Walks, the Brain Initiative, and the Genius of Einstein's Brain

by Wadsworth in Wadsworth Guidance

Over a four-month period in 1905, Einstein published a series of remarkable papers that changed our conception of time and space.
Even more remarkable is the instrument that enabled Einstein to unlock the mysteries of time and space.  His brain.  Credit: internetarchivebookimages
Some100 billion neurons allowed Einstein to think.  And in order to do this, the neurons in Einstein's developing brain formed a network of neural circuits.  By sending out process........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2014
  • 08:06 PM
  • 123 views

Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Mental Health – What Does it Take ?

by Vivek Misra in The UberBrain

“These are ways of treating illness that have developed outside the mainstream of modern medicine.” (The Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2009) There is growing evidence that Complementary Therapies are being used to good effect within mental health services throughout the UK and Internationally. Many clinicians are expanding the spectrum and variety of services to be offered to patients/clients both in the hospital and in the community. In recent years complementary therapies have become inc........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2014
  • 04:10 PM
  • 134 views

Solar Panel Hybrid is Cheap and Super Efficient

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Solar cells are inefficient, it’s a sad fact. With todays technology they boast about a 10-15% efficiency, compare that to todays gas engine at roughly 20-25% and you can see it’s not quite up to par. Well that could all change very soon thanks to a new method for transferring energy from organic to inorganic semiconductors. This could boost the efficiency of widely used inorganic solar cells to as close as 100% efficiency as they can get.... Read more »

Tabachnyk M, Ehrler B, Gélinas S, Böhm ML, Walker BJ, Musselman KP, Greenham NC, Friend RH, & Rao A. (2014) Resonant energy transfer of triplet excitons from pentacene to PbSe nanocrystals. Nature materials. PMID: 25282509  

  • October 9, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 103 views

October 9, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

As Tom and Jerry have proven time and time again, repulsive forces are serious business and highly entertaining. Today’s image is from a paper describing how different cell types repel one another to help create boundaries between tissues. The study of how cells adhere to or repel one another is an important field of study in developmental biology. Ephrin ligands and their respective Eph receptors trigger repulsive cues between cells of different types. Many different tissue types expr........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2014
  • 12:35 PM
  • 96 views

Keep Calm and Evolve On

by Lauren Richardson in PLOS Biologue

Lauren Richardson, Associate Editor for PLOS Biology, discusses a new paper published in the journal. We generally think of evolution as a beneficial process, letting organisms adapt and excel in new and different environments. But as we all know, not … Continue reading »The post Keep Calm and Evolve On appeared first on PLOS Biologue.... Read more »

Szamecz, B., Boross, G., Kalapis, D., Kovács, K., Fekete, G., Farkas, Z., Lázár, V., Hrtyan, M., Kemmeren, P., Groot Koerkamp, M.... (2014) The Genomic Landscape of Compensatory Evolution. PLoS Biology, 12(8). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001935  

  • October 9, 2014
  • 12:11 PM
  • 102 views

Fine control

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

My last blog on timing in some neurons in the cerebellum has started a string of thoughts. Here we have a part of the brain with an anatomy that is well mapped as opposed to many other parts. It has more neurons than the rest of the brain put together. It has grown relatively larger […]... Read more »

  • October 9, 2014
  • 09:43 AM
  • 159 views

Dyslexia: trouble reading ‘four’

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Dyslexia affects about every tenth reader. It shows up when trying to read, especially when reading fast. But it is still not fully clear what words dyslexic readers find particularly hard. So, I did some research to find out, and I published the article today. Imagine seeing a new word ‘bour’. How would you pronounce […]... Read more »

  • October 9, 2014
  • 04:41 AM
  • 116 views

Physical activity and fitness levels and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Although at present having to be slightly more cautious following some recent surgery (general anaesthetic is awesome by the way!), I normally consider myself to be quite an active person. Through previous discussions on this blog covering topics on the positive effects of walking (see here) and the physical+ benefits of the martial arts (see here) I'd like to think that there are quite a few ways and means that the population at large can easily increase their daily physical activity levels. Th........ Read more »

  • October 8, 2014
  • 08:51 PM
  • 94 views

Foot Orthotics for Reducing Load in the Plantar Fascia

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Foot Orthotics for Reducing Load in the Plantar Fascia... Read more »

  • October 8, 2014
  • 06:57 PM
  • 69 views

How Modern Genomics Crushed Bigfoot Pseudoscience

by Emil Karlsson in Debunking Denialism

Thousands of people around the world believe in the existence of a large primate that roams the mountain forests. It is known by many names, such as Bigfoot, Yeti and Sasquatch. Many of these enthusiasts even claim to have genuine biological samples from these creatures. Skeptics have so far remain unconvinced. No authentic photographs or video material has been produced (the one on the right is a man in a suit) and no bodies have been found. Meanwhile, cryptozoologists complain that scientist a........ Read more »

Sykes, B., Mullis, R., Hagenmuller, C., Melton, T., & Sartori, M. (2014) Genetic analysis of hair samples attributed to yeti, bigfoot and other anomalous primates. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1789). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0161  

  • October 8, 2014
  • 04:43 PM
  • 106 views

tRNA lookalikes in the Human Genome

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There was a time not long ago when we knew we had the longest genome. It was an obvious assumption because we are "in fact" the most intelligent and complex species on the planet. Boy were we wrong, as genetics progressed we came to realize that we weren't as genetically special as we thought we were. We found that we had tons of "junk" DNA. Of course we continue to be wrong and we now know that we may not be the biggest genome on the planet, but we are still very complex and new research is pro........ Read more »

  • October 8, 2014
  • 11:45 AM
  • 111 views

The Surprising History of Veterinary Medicine for Dogs and Cats

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

And the ‘dangerous’ woman who played a vital role.Photo: Bildagentur Zoonar GmbHWe are used to the idea that veterinarians treat dogs, cats, rabbits and other small animals, but it wasn’t always so. Before the automobile, the main role for vets was in the treatment of horses. As the number of horses declined, two British government reports (in 1938 and 1944) suggested vets should specialize in the treatment of farm animals. The change to small animals is often explained as due to incr........ Read more »

  • October 8, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 111 views

A Tale Of Two Tails

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Recent, and not so recent studies, are showing just how specialized eukaryotic flagella can be. Structures are rigid, except for when they aren’t. Sperm from two species of diatoms have very different sperm tail basal bodies, which might affect how they move and function. On the other hand, rabbits have flagella with at least three different structures. Does each have it’s own function?... Read more »

Prensier, G., Vivier, E., Goldstein, S., & Schrevel, J. (1980) Motile flagellum with a "3 0" ultrastructure. Science, 207(4438), 1493-1494. DOI: 10.1126/science.7189065  

Feistel K, & Blum M. (2006) Three types of cilia including a novel 9 4 axoneme on the notochordal plate of the rabbit embryo. Developmental dynamics : an official publication of the American Association of Anatomists, 235(12), 3348-58. PMID: 17061268  

  • October 8, 2014
  • 06:49 AM
  • 93 views

Video Tip of the Week: UCSC #Ebola Genome Portal

by Mary in OpenHelix

Although I had other tips in my queue already, over the last week I’ve seen a lot of talk about the new Ebola virus portal from the UCSC Genome Browser team. And it struck me that researchers who have worked primarily on viral sequences may not be as familiar with the functions of the UCSC […]... Read more »

Karolchik D., G. P. Barber, J. Casper, H. Clawson, M. S. Cline, M. Diekhans, T. R. Dreszer, P. A. Fujita, L. Guruvadoo, M. Haeussler.... (2013) The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2014 update. Nucleic Acids Research, 42(D1). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkt1168  

  • October 8, 2014
  • 04:34 AM
  • 117 views

Alcohol and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I tread very carefully with this post today looking at some of the peer-reviewed research on the topic of alcohol use (and abuse) and autism without wishing to stigmatise nor generalise.I was brought to this important topic as a result of the recent paper by Tabata and colleagues [1] who discussed three case reports of alcoholism associated with a diagnosis of autism. For each person described in that report, a common theme describing alcohol being used as a means to "reduce anxiety" related to ........ Read more »

Tabata K, Yoshida T, & Naoe J. (2014) Three cases of alcoholism with autism spectrum disorder. Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire). PMID: 25221235  

  • October 8, 2014
  • 04:03 AM
  • 65 views

Students learn better when they think they're going to have to teach the material

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Researchers say they've uncovered a simple technique that improves students' memory for passages of text. All that's required is to tell the students that they're going to have to teach the material to someone else.Fifty-six undergrads were split into two groups. One group were told that they had 10 minutes to study a 1500-word passage about fictional depictions of The Charge of The Light Brigade, and that they would be tested on it afterwards. The other group were similarly given 10 minutes to ........ Read more »

  • October 8, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 107 views

Stronger May not be Better in Decreasing the Risk of High Magnitude Head Impacts in Football

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Football players with greater cervical neck muscle strength and size were as likely to sustain larger head impacts as their peers. Football players who had greater cervical stiffness and an ability to decrease the displacement of their head following perturbation were less likely to sustain a moderate and severe head impacts.... Read more »

Schmidt, J., Guskiewicz, K., Blackburn, J., Mihalik, J., Siegmund, G., & Marshall, S. (2014) The Influence of Cervical Muscle Characteristics on Head Impact Biomechanics in Football. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(9), 2056-2066. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514536685  

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