Post List

  • October 3, 2014
  • 06:46 PM
  • 78 views

Tough decisions for the developing brain

by Misato Iwashita in the Node

To form complex organs, somatic stem cells proliferate and then differentiate during development. In this process, intrinsic factors, i.e. the sequential expression of transcriptional genes, and extrinsic factors, i.e. extracellular microenvironment, are intimately involved. Recent in vitro studies have revealed that the physical properties of the extracellular niche, possibly tissue stiffness, may play an important […]... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 05:24 PM
  • 127 views

The Neurobiological Basis of a Human-Pet Relationship

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

My wife adores our cats. Now, I'm not a cat person, but my wife loves them. In fact if we had children and someone held a gun to her head and said choose between the kid or the cats, there would likely be an uncomfortable amount of time before a response. The big question is, why do we love animals like we do our own children? Well a small study helps try to answer this complex question by investigating differences in how important brain structures are activated when women view images of their c........ Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 04:01 PM
  • 120 views

Sleeping Brains Understand Words

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Have you ever heard someone describe a task as being so easy that they ‘could do it in their sleep’? A fascinating new study from a team of French neuroscientists shows that this statement may be literally true, far more often than you’d think: Inducing Task-Relevant Responses to Speech in the Sleeping Brain Sid Kouider […]The post Sleeping Brains Understand Words appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Kouider S, Andrillon T, Barbosa LS, Goupil L, & Bekinschtein TA. (2014) Inducing task-relevant responses to speech in the sleeping brain. Current Biology, 24(18), 2208-14. PMID: 25220055  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 11:55 AM
  • 86 views

Tricksy insects sing a song of love and deceit

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Beyond a spider snacking on an unfortunate fly, the social lives of insects tend to go unrecognized. Perhaps you notice all the ants marching in a line, or bees heading back to a nest, but it all seems so mechanical, so primal. … Continue reading →... Read more »

Nakano, R., Ihara, F., Mishiro, K., Toyama, M., & Toda, S. (2014) Double meaning of courtship song in a moth. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1789), 20140840-20140840. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0840  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 11:00 AM
  • 96 views

How the brain encodes massive spaces

by Sick Papes in Sick Papes

Rich, P., Liaw, H., & Lee, A. (2014). Large environments reveal the statistical structure governing hippocampal representations. Science, 345 (6198), 814-817 DOI: 10.1126/science.1255635

Have you ever felt lost and alone? If so, this experience probably involved your hippocampus, a seahorse-shaped structure in the middle of the brain. About 40 years ago, scientists with electrodes discovered that some neurons in the hippocampus fire each time an animal passes through a particular location in ........ Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 10:38 AM
  • 94 views

Pediatric respiratory tract infections and antibiotics: overprescribing?

by Aurelie in Coffee break Science

Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat to human health. As the WHO global report published in April 2014 highlighted, it is no longer a concern for the future but happening right now, in every part of the world. It threatens … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 10:38 AM
  • 93 views

Breaking Research: Aging can be delayed in fruit flies by activating AMPK in the gut

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

How can we slow or even halt the steady march of aging? In a previous post, I reviewed a paper that asked “What causes aging?” (the prevailing hypothesis is that aging is caused by accumulating cell damage). Understanding why we age is important for developing ways to interfere with the process. But there are other […]... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 10:02 AM
  • 94 views

How to Say “SOS” in Catfish

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

It’s good to have a plan in case of emergency. If there’s a fire, take the stairs to the ground floor. If a bird tries to eat you, say “ERK ERK ERK” by grinding your spine bone against your shoulder bone until it drops you. That latter one will work best if you’re a certain […]The post How to Say “SOS” in Catfish appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 09:46 AM
  • 113 views

Did a five-day camp without digital devices really boost children's interpersonal skills?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

"There's a brilliant study that came out two weeks ago," Baroness Professor Susan Greenfield said at a recent event promoting her new book, "... they took away all [the pre-teens'] digital devices for five days and sent them to summer camp ... and tested their interpersonal skills, and guess what, even within five days they'd changed."Greenfield highlighted this study in the context of her dire warnings about the harmful psychological effects of modern screen- and internet-based technologies. Sh........ Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 08:40 AM
  • 103 views

The Friday Five for 10/3/2014

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

The coolest science of the week, including the physics of space battles, leeches eating worms, and how to get others to do your bidding!... Read more »

O'Shea TJ, Cryan PM, Cunningham AA, Fooks AR, Hayman DT, Luis AD, Peel AJ, Plowright RK, & Wood JL. (2014) Bat flight and zoonotic viruses. Emerging infectious diseases, 20(5), 741-5. PMID: 24750692  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 05:17 AM
  • 86 views

Routine screening of lung resections taken during surgery for pneumothorax may help identify unrecognised cases of BHD

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

In many cases, early diagnosis means treatments are more effective, cost less and save more lives. Screening programmes aid early diagnosis and can be used to screen whole populations, such as the fetal anomaly screening given to all pregnant women … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 05:10 AM
  • 114 views

S100B and schizophrenia meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't know if it's just me but this year (2014) I seem to be covering a lot more meta-analysis papers on this blog. I assume that's because of the increasing volume of peer-reviewed research being created year-on-year leading to greater volumes of research fodder for such grand reviews. Whatever the reason(s), there are some really interesting conclusions being reached in that literature as per the meta-analysis by Aleksovska and colleagues [1] (open-access) focusing on S100B bl........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 07:46 PM
  • 111 views

Ambivalence and Eating Disorders: Inpatient Treatment, Belonging, and Identity

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


When Tetyana Tweeted and “Tumblr-ed” (is there a better name for putting something on Tumblr?) a quote from a qualitative research article about ambivalence and eating disorders, I knew I would want write a blog post about it. Of course, life happened, and so this post is coming a little later than I had intended. Nonetheless, I am happy to be sharing a post about a fresh article by Karin Eli (2014) about eating disorders and ambivalence in the inpatient hospital setting. The article i........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 06:16 PM
  • 136 views

Living on the edge: graphene quantum dots perform as well as platinum in fuel cell electrodes

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Down with platinum! New research out of Rice University shows that graphene quantum dots attached to graphene oxide sheets perform as well as platinum in fuel cell electrodes. And they're much cheaper!... Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 05:04 PM
  • 162 views

The Mysterious Origins of HIV Discovered

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There have been a lot of theories on where HIV came from, anywhere from the mundane, it spread from other animals. To the down right crazy, the government created it to wipe out homosexuals. Well bad news for conspiracy theorists, a new study suggests that the HIV pandemic with us today is almost certain to have begun its global spread from Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).... Read more »

Nuno R. Faria1, Andrew Rambaut, Marc A. Suchard, Guy Baele, Trevor Bedford, Melissa J. Ward, Andrew J. Tatem, João D. Sousa, Nimalan Arinaminpathy, Jacques Pépin,.... (2014) The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations. Science. info:/10.1126/science.1256739

  • October 2, 2014
  • 02:01 PM
  • 42 views

Survivin: You wouldn’t be alive without it

by Clay Clark in Biochem Blogs

  Enzymes perform numerous tasks in order to contribute to the global goal of organism survival. One such enzyme is Survivin. Survivin wears many “hats” within the cell and is a vital part of cellular homeostasis. Here I will introduce you to two of the main processes Survivin regulates. Survivin is a multifunctional protein involved […]... Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 11:01 AM
  • 129 views

Parenting: Genetics and Environmental Effects

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Effective parenting is a key element in child development.Both genetic and environmental factors appear to contribute to the cognitive, emotional and behavioral aspects of parenting.Childhood temperament also influences the process of parenting. A well-behaved, emotionally stable and loving child is obviously much easier to parent than a child with behavioral and emotional problems.Bonamy Oliver and colleagues from the United Kingdom have recently published an informative twin study of pare........ Read more »

Oliver BR, Trzaskowski M, & Plomin R. (2014) Genetics of parenting: The power of the dark side. Developmental psychology, 50(4), 1233-40. PMID: 24364831  

  • October 2, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 15 views

Gamifying Surveys to Increase Completion Rate and Data Quality

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

One of the biggest challenges for research involving surveys is maintaining a high rate of completion and compliance with survey requirements. First, we want a reasonably representative sample of whomever we send the survey to. Second, we want those that do complete the survey to do so honestly and thoughtfully. One approach that researchers have taken to […]The post Gamifying Surveys to Increase Completion Rate and Data Quality appeared first on NeoAcademic.Related articles from NeoAcad........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 08:03 AM
  • 122 views

Coeliac disease risk not affected by early feeding practices

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'd like to bring three papers to your attention, all united by their discussion of coeliac (celiac) disease, that most classic of autoimmune conditions in the most part managed by the use of a lifelong gluten-free diet.First up are the papers by Elena Lionetti and colleagues [1] and Sabine Vriezinga and colleagues [2] which unfortunately pour cold water on the notion that the risk of developing coeliac disease (CD) can be somehow mitigated via the use of either the early or delayed in........ Read more »

Lionetti E, Castellaneta S, Francavilla R, Pulvirenti A, Tonutti E, Amarri S, Barbato M, Barbera C, Barera G, Bellantoni A.... (2014) Introduction of Gluten, HLA Status, and the Risk of Celiac Disease in Children. The New England journal of medicine, 371(14), 1295-1303. PMID: 25271602  

Vriezinga SL, Auricchio R, Bravi E, Castillejo G, Chmielewska A, Crespo Escobar P, Kolaček S, Koletzko S, Korponay-Szabo IR, Mummert E.... (2014) Randomized Feeding Intervention in Infants at High Risk for Celiac Disease. The New England journal of medicine, 371(14), 1304-1315. PMID: 25271603  

  • October 2, 2014
  • 06:37 AM
  • 118 views

What do sperm have to do with brain tumors?

by pknoepfler in the Node

  This post was originally published in the Knoepfler Lab Stem Cell Blog.      Sometimes in science there are unexpected threads tying seemingly very different things together. Unraveling the knots in these threads can lead to new insights into important developmental processes and mechanisms of disease. My lab studies epigenomic and transcription factors including […]... Read more »

Yuen, B., Bush, K., Barrilleaux, B., Cotterman, R., & Knoepfler, P. (2014) Histone H3.3 regulates dynamic chromatin states during spermatogenesis. Development, 141(18), 3483-3494. DOI: 10.1242/dev.106450  

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