Post List

  • May 15, 2015
  • 04:07 AM
  • 64 views

2014 NOFOMA Special Issue

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

I am very happy to present the 2014 NOFOMA Special Issue, which I have recently co-edited for the International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management. It contains some of the best research that has been presented at the 26th NOFOMA Conference, which took place at Copenhagen Business School last year. First, the article by […]... Read more »

  • May 15, 2015
  • 03:53 AM
  • 68 views

30th Anniversary of Farman et al. (1985) – the ozone hole paper

by Andy Russell in Our Clouded Hills

It’s been 30 years since Farman et al. published their paper on the ozone “hole”. (Well, I’m a day early but who posts on Saturdays, eh?) It had a huge impact: it’s been cited nearly 3,000 times and accelerated the negotiations that resulted in the Montreal Protocol, which helped phase out the chemicals that were […]... Read more »

  • May 14, 2015
  • 10:42 PM
  • 16 views

Gene Expression Signatures May Help Differentiate Sepsis From Non-Infectious Inflammation

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Timothy E Sweeney, MD PhD Resident, General Surgery Postdoc, Khatri Lab, Bioinformatics Stanford University Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Sweeney: Sepsis is defined as the presence of … Continue reading →
The post Gene Expression Signatures May Help Differentiate Sepsis From Non-Infectious Inflammation appeared first on MedicalResearc........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Timothy E Sweeney, MD PhD. (2015) Gene Expression Signatures May Help Differentiate Sepsis From Non-Infectious Inflammation. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 14, 2015
  • 05:48 PM
  • 17 views

Hospital System Efficiently Uses MRI To Screen For Stroke and Shorten Treatment Window

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Amie W. Hsia, MD Medical Director, Comprehensive Stroke Center MedStar Washington Hospital Center NIH Stroke Program at MWHC Associate Professor, Neurology Georgetown University Washington, DC 20010   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What … Continue reading →
The post Hospital System Efficiently Uses MRI To Screen For Stroke and Shorten Treatment Window appeared f........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Amie W. Hsia, MD. (2015) Hospital System Efficiently Uses MRI To Screen For Stroke and Shorten Treatment Window. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 14, 2015
  • 05:23 PM
  • 22 views

Scientists Get Closer To A Vaccine Against Allergies

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Christine McCusker MD Associate Professor, Department Pediatrics Meakins-Christie Laboratories McGill University and the MUHCRI, Montreal Quebec, Canada Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. McCusker: When the body … Continue reading →
The post Scientists Get Closer To A Vaccine Against Allergies appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medi........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Christine McCusker MD. (2015) Scientists Get Closer To A Vaccine Against Allergies. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 14, 2015
  • 02:52 PM
  • 88 views

Educating the immune system: A vaccine for allergies

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

With the arrival of spring, millions of people have begun their annual ritual of sneezing and wheezing due to seasonal allergies. However, a Canadian research team is bringing them hope with a potential vaccine that nudges the immune response away from developing allergies. The findings have major clinical implications since allergies and asthma are lifelong conditions that often start in childhood and for which there is presently no cure.... Read more »

  • May 14, 2015
  • 01:15 PM
  • 78 views

Mary-Claire King on Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

It is a rare but delightful opportunity to learn about something from an acknowledged world expert. Such was the case last month when I heard Mary-Claire King give the Stanley J. Korsmeyer Memorial lecture, hands-down one of the best talks I’ve ever heard. She was a wonderful public speaker: funny, charming, and straight-shooting. Her topic, of […]... Read more »

Hall JM, Lee MK, Newman B, Morrow JE, Anderson LA, Huey B, & King MC. (1990) Linkage of early-onset familial breast cancer to chromosome 17q21. Science (New York, N.Y.), 250(4988), 1684-9. PMID: 2270482  

King MC. (2014) "The race" to clone BRCA1. Science (New York, N.Y.), 343(6178), 1462-5. PMID: 24675952  

  • May 14, 2015
  • 12:16 PM
  • 87 views

Death and Landscapes: Why Does Location Matter?

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

This week, I’m attending the Cultural Landscapes and Heritage Values conference at UMass Amherst. I am going to be speaking Thursday at the 8-10 am session, “Universities as Examples of […]... Read more »

Howard M. R. Williams. (1997) Ancient Landscapes and the dead: the reuse of prehistoric and Roman monuments as early Anglo-Saxon burial sites. Medieval Archaeology, 1-31. info:/

Lynne Goldstein. (1995) Landscapes and Mortuary Practices. Regional Approaches to Mortuary Analysis Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology, 101-121. DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4899-1310-4_5  

  • May 14, 2015
  • 10:31 AM
  • 91 views

Male Depression Risk Via Childhood Conduct Disorder

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Conduct disorder represents an important childhood-onset condition that commonly persists into adulthood.Adult antisocial personality disorder and substance abuse are known risks associated with conduct disorder.A recent study by Kenneth Kendler and Charles Gardner identified male conduct disorder as a risk factor for adult major depression.Their study using the Virginia Twin Registry examined 20 developmental risk factors in male and female twins for presence of recent adult major depression.A ........ Read more »

  • May 14, 2015
  • 09:39 AM
  • 79 views

What’s The Answer? (brain connectome)

by Mary in OpenHelix

This week’s highlighted item lets you find answers in brains. What do the brain connections look like in 3D? I love 3D brain maps–not in a zombie manner, just in an astonishing complexity manner. And although this is a different type of computational resource than we usually explore, I thought it was interesting. Biostars is […]... Read more »

Szalkai, B., Kerepesi, C., Varga, B., & Grolmusz, V. (2015) The Budapest Reference Connectome Server v2.0. Neuroscience Letters, 60-62. DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2015.03.071  

  • May 14, 2015
  • 09:30 AM
  • 95 views

Darwin Can Dance! The Evolution Of Pop Music

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Just like biological organisms, music evolves - and where there is evolution, there is science. Researchers analyzing pop music charts have identified the greatest musical revolution in recent times. What do you think it was? Elvis, British Invasion, Disco, Synth-pop, Heavy Metal, Hip-hop, Grunge, or Punk?... Read more »

  • May 14, 2015
  • 06:41 AM
  • 24 views

Pregnant Women Have Same Low Rate Of Adverse Surgical Outcomes As Non-Pregnant Patients

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Robert A. Meguid, MD MPH FACS Assistant Professor Section of General Thoracic Surgery Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery Department of Surgery University of Colorado Denver | Anschutz Medical Campus Aurora, CO 80045 Medical Research: What is the background … Continue reading →
The post Pregnant Women Have Same Low Rate Of Adverse Surgical Outcomes As Non-Pregnant Patients appeared first ........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Robert A. Meguid, MD MPH FACS. (2015) Pregnant Women Have Same Low Rate Of Adverse Surgical Outcomes As Non-Pregnant Patients. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 14, 2015
  • 06:20 AM
  • 17 views

Study Identifies One Pathway Cancer Cells Use To Evade Death

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Katherine Aird, Ph.D. Gene Expression and Regulation Program The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Aird: Senescence is considered an important tumor suppressor mechanism. In … Continue reading →
The post Study Identifies One Pathway Cancer Cells Use To Evade Death appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Med........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Katherine Aird, Ph.D. (2015) Study Identifies One Pathway Cancer Cells Use To Evade Death. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 14, 2015
  • 04:49 AM
  • 80 views

Anxiety and depression linked to functional bowel issues: lessons for [some] autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Pablo Picasso (1905) @ WikipediaIMFAR (International Meeting For Autism Research) 2015 kicks off in earnest today (see here) so in order to keep tabs on the various discussions over the web (#IMFAR2015) alongside the usual workload I'm offering a relatively short blog entry.The paper served up today is by Maria Ines Pinto-Sánchez and colleagues [1] who reported that: "The prevalence of both anxiety and depression is influenced by gender, presence of organic diseases, and FGIDs [f........ Read more »

  • May 14, 2015
  • 04:46 AM
  • 31 views

Do we really love our favourite brands the same way we love people?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

People can get awfully attached to their preferred brands. Some tattoo logos on their skin, others camp out overnight to buy the latest products. Late in life, people often still favour and trust brands from their youth. But is brand obsession and attachment really the same as the love we feel for people?The question is pertinent for researchers in the field of consumer psychology where there's a tendency to apply theories and measures from the study of interpersonal love to the study of brand a........ Read more »

  • May 14, 2015
  • 12:55 AM
  • 73 views

Cell motion associated with stemness

by Daisuke Nanba in the Node

Stem cells play crucial roles in development as well as tissue homeostasis, repair, and regeneration, and their dysregulation is involved in diseases and aging of the tissues. The stem cell is defined as a cell that has the ability to self-renew and also to produce differentiated progeny for a long-term. Yet, stem cells require other […]... Read more »

Nanba, D., Toki, F., Matsushita, N., Matsushita, S., Higashiyama, S., & Barrandon, Y. (2013) Actin filament dynamics impacts keratinocyte stem cell maintenance. EMBO Molecular Medicine, 5(4), 640-653. DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201201839  

Nanba, D., Toki, F., Tate, S., Imai, M., Matsushita, N., Shiraishi, K., Sayama, K., Toki, H., Higashiyama, S., & Barrandon, Y. (2015) Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness. The Journal of Cell Biology, 209(2), 305-315. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201409024  

  • May 13, 2015
  • 07:54 PM
  • 21 views

Genomic Instability Biomarker May Help Predict Treatment Response In Triple Negative Breast Cancer

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Melinda L. Telli, M.D.Assistant Professor of MedicineStanford UniversityDivision of Medical OncologyStanford, CA 94305-5826 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: A major goal of this study was to explore … Continue reading →
The post Genomic Instability Biomarker May Help Predict Treatment Response In Triple Negative Breast Cancer appea........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Melinda L. Telli, M.D. Assistant. (2015) Genomic Instability Biomarker May Help Predict Treatment Response In Triple Negative Breast Cancer. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 13, 2015
  • 04:07 PM
  • 105 views

Can drinking alcohol harm the child before the mother knows she is pregnant?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

These days pregnant “moms to be” have lots of things to worry about, from second hand smoke to the chemicals in their make-up. Well they can unfortunately add one more thing to that list, a new study finds that alcohol drunk by a mouse in early pregnancy changes the way genes function in the brains of the offspring. The early exposure was also later apparent in the brain structure of the adult offspring. The timing of the exposure corresponds to the human gestational weeks 3-6 in terms of fe........ Read more »

Heidi Marjonen, Alejandra Sierra, Anna Nyman, Vladimir Rogojin, Olli Gröhn, Anni-Maija Linden, Sampsa Hautaniemi, & Nina Kaminen-Ahola. (2015) Early Maternal Alcohol Consumption Alters Hippocampal DNA Methylation, Gene Expression and Volume in a Mouse Model. PLOS ONE. info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0124931

  • May 13, 2015
  • 02:46 PM
  • 26 views

Basic Research Of Ovarian Development May Lead To Understanding Of Ovarian Disorders

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Humphrey Yao, Ph.D. Lead Researcher Reproductive and Developmental Biology Laboratory National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Research Triangle Park, North Carolina Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What … Continue reading →
The post Basic Research Of Ovarian Development May Lead To Understanding Of Ovarian Disorde........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Humphrey Yao, Ph.D. (2015) Basic Research Of Ovarian Development May Lead To Understanding Of Ovarian Disorders. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 13, 2015
  • 01:34 PM
  • 21 views

Combining Acceleration and Skin Temperature Can Improve Accuracy of Physical Activity Monitors

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Shang-Ming Zhou Senior Lecturer in Statistical Modelling and Analytics for Epidemiology and Public Health, Public Health Informatics Group, Health Information Research Unit (HIRU), UKCRC DECIPHer (Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement) Centre, … Continue reading →
The post Combining Acceleration and Skin Temperature Can Improve Accuracy of Physi........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Shang-Ming Zhou. (2015) Combining Acceleration and Skin Temperature Can Improve Accuracy of Physical Activity Monitors. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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