Post List

  • April 12, 2014
  • 11:54 PM
  • 85 views

Early brain development and heat shock proteins

by in Neuroscientifically Challenged

The brain development of a fetus is really an amazing thing. The first sign of an incipient nervous system emerges during the third week of development; it is simply a thickened layer of tissue called the neural plate. After about 5 more days, the neural plate has formed an indentation called the neural groove, and the sides of the neural groove have curled up and begun to fuse together (see pic to the right). This will form the neural tube, which will eventually become the brain and spinal cord........ Read more »

  • April 12, 2014
  • 04:58 PM
  • 80 views

Summer and winter Blackcaps and evolution

by Africa Gomez in BugBlog

During April, Blackcaps return to thickets and woodland, where the male's beautiful song joins the resident birds. These Blackcaps have just arrived from their winter quarters in Spain and North and coastal West Africa. We tend to think of migration behaviour as something fixed, but recent research shows that many birds have recently changed their migration routes. One of these is the Blackcap.In the last 50 years or so, a small contingent of Blackcaps have started to winter in the UK. About 30%........ Read more »

  • April 12, 2014
  • 01:38 PM
  • 78 views

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Causes, Symptoms, and Home Remedies

by Imtiaz Ibne Alam in Medical-Reference - A Pioneer in Medical Blogging

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of woman's infertility. It is a problem results from an imbalance of female sex hormones. It may cause irregular menstruation, difficulties in getting pregnant, and cysts in the ovaries. If it's not treated, overtime it can lead to diabetes and several other troubling health conditions.... Read more »

Pau CT, Keefe CC, & Welt CK. (2013) Cigarette smoking, nicotine levels and increased risk for metabolic syndrome in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, 29(6), 551-5. PMID: 23656383  

  • April 12, 2014
  • 12:12 PM
  • 89 views

Flexible Plastics Turn Vibrations Into Electrical Energy

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Kui Yao and co-workers from the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering in Singapore have discovered a way to give lightweight polymer vibration harvesters a hundredfold boost in energy output—a finding that may help to eliminate manual battery recharging in microsensors and mobile devices. ... Read more »

Lei Zhang, ., Oh, S., Ting Chong Wong, ., Chin Yaw Tan, ., & Kui Yao, . (2013) Piezoelectric polymer multilayer on flexible substrate for energy harvesting. IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, 60(9), 2013-2020. DOI: 10.1109/TUFFC.2013.2786  

  • April 12, 2014
  • 05:59 AM
  • 65 views

Detailed regional data reduce warming-drought link doubts

by Andy Extance in Simple Climate

In Portugal and Spain climate change has already driven over 2°C of warming in summer, and new findings from Sergio Vicente-Serrano from the Pyrenean Institute of Ecology are dispelling uncertainties that the temperatures are making drought more severe and widespread. ... Read more »

Vicente-Serrano, S., Lopez-Moreno, J., Beguería, S., Lorenzo-Lacruz, J., Sanchez-Lorenzo, A., García-Ruiz, J., Azorin-Molina, C., Morán-Tejeda, E., Revuelto, J., Trigo, R.... (2014) Evidence of increasing drought severity caused by temperature rise in southern Europe. Environmental Research Letters, 9(4), 44001. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/9/4/044001  

  • April 11, 2014
  • 06:25 PM
  • 87 views

Dad's obesity and risk of offspring autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

In this post I'm talking about the paper by Pål Surén and colleagues [1] and their suggestion that "paternal obesity is an independent risk factor for ASDs [autism spectrum disorders] in children". I do so not with the intent of stigmatising parents and specifically parents with weight issues, which tend to be present for many more reasons than just food and exercise (see here), but merely to highlight how parental physical health may show some relationship to offspring cog........ Read more »

Suren, P., Gunnes, N., Roth, C., Bresnahan, M., Hornig, M., Hirtz, D., Lie, K., Lipkin, W., Magnus, P., Reichborn-Kjennerud, T.... (2014) Parental Obesity and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder. PEDIATRICS. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2013-3664  

  • April 11, 2014
  • 12:46 PM
  • 105 views

Variant Annotation in Coding Regions

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

The analysis of NGS data comes with many challenges — data management, read alignment, variant calling, etc. — that the bioinformatics community has tackled with some success. Today I want to discuss another critical component of analysis that remains an unsolved problem: annotation of genetic variants. This process, in which we try to predict the […]... Read more »

Davis J McCarthy, Peter Humburg, Alexander Kanapin, Manuel A Rivas, Kyle Gaulton, The WGS500 Consortium, Jean-Baptiste Cazier and Peter Donnelly. (2014) Choice of transcripts and software has a large effect on variant annotation. Genome Medicine, 6(26). info:/doi:10.1186/gm543

  • April 11, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 78 views

Smiling and credibility: Is it different for male and female witnesses at trial?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Women smile more than men. Men are typically seen as more credible than women. So these researchers decided to see if there was a relationship between smiling and assessments of credibility on actual witnesses in the courtroom.  The researchers used the Witness Credibility Scale to assess actual witnesses overall credibility. They thought that if smiling […]

Related posts:
Women as Expert Witnesses: The good, the sad, and the ugly
Which is the more moral negotiator? The male or the femal........ Read more »

  • April 11, 2014
  • 05:59 AM
  • 111 views

Don’t forget the cerebellum

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

Many theories of humanness rely on a simple idea that the cerebral cortex is enlarged in humans relative to other primates and in primates relative to other mammals. So it must be the cerebral cortex that is the important part of the brain, giving us our smarts and our skills. What is often overlooked is […]... Read more »

  • April 11, 2014
  • 03:48 AM
  • 147 views

Brain Scans: Don’t Throw Out The Baby With The Dead Salmon

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Is neuro-skepticism in danger of going too far? Is it time to take a critical look at critiques of neuroscience? Martha Farah of the University of Pennsylvania says yes, in a Hastings Center Report just published: Brain Images, Babies, and Bathwater: Critiquing Critiques of Functional Neuroimaging Farah covers a broad spectrum of criticisms, ranging from […]The post Brain Scans: Don’t Throw Out The Baby With The Dead Salmon appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • April 11, 2014
  • 03:00 AM
  • 128 views

Highlights from the 4th International Kidney Cancer Coalition Conference

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

In the first week of April, the International Kidney Cancer Coalition (IKCC) held its 4th Expanding Circles conference in Amsterdam. The meeting brought together kidney cancer patient advocates from all over the world to discuss current and future treatments, best … Continue reading →... Read more »

De Angelis R, Sant M, Coleman MP, Francisci S, Baili P, Pierannunzio D, Trama A, Visser O, Brenner H, Ardanaz E.... (2014) Cancer survival in Europe 1999-2007 by country and age: results of EUROCARE--5-a population-based study. The lancet oncology, 15(1), 23-34. PMID: 24314615  

Ko JJ, Choueiri TK, Rini BI, Lee JL, Kroeger N, Srinivas S, Harshman LC, Knox JJ, Bjarnason GA, Mackenzie MJ.... (2014) First-, second-, third-line therapy for mRCC: benchmarks for trial design from the IMDC. British journal of cancer. PMID: 24691425  

  • April 11, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 122 views

Can Biochemical Markers in the Blood Detect Concussions?

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Biochemical markers in the blood, like T-tau, are elevated after a concussion and are associated with recovery time. These markers may eventually be developed into clinical tools to determine diagnosis and prognosis after concussions as well as to devise improved return-to-play decisions.... Read more »

Shahim, P., Tegner, Y., Wilson, D., Randall, J., Skillbäck, T., Pazooki, D., Kallberg, B., Blennow, K., & Zetterberg, H. (2014) Blood Biomarkers for Brain Injury in Concussed Professional Ice Hockey Players. JAMA Neurology. DOI: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.367  

  • April 10, 2014
  • 05:33 PM
  • 145 views

Tamiflu and Zanamivir: are they effective in treating Influenza or not ?

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

A recently published report from the Cochrane Colloboration suggested that two drugs which are used in the treatment of human Influenza are not as effective as reported in clinical studies, so it is worth to pause a moment and recapitulate how these drugs work and take a closer look at the report before rushing to any judgment.
... Read more »

Moscona, A. (2005) Neuraminidase Inhibitors for Influenza. New England Journal of Medicine, 353(13), 1363-1373. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMra050740  

Rossman JS, Jing X, Leser GP, Balannik V, Pinto LH, & Lamb RA. (2010) Influenza virus m2 ion channel protein is necessary for filamentous virion formation. Journal of virology, 84(10), 5078-88. PMID: 20219914  

Rossman JS, Leser GP, & Lamb RA. (2012) Filamentous influenza virus enters cells via macropinocytosis. Journal of virology, 86(20), 10950-60. PMID: 22875971  

van Riel D, den Bakker MA, Leijten LM, Chutinimitkul S, Munster VJ, de Wit E, Rimmelzwaan GF, Fouchier RA, Osterhaus AD, & Kuiken T. (2010) Seasonal and pandemic human influenza viruses attach better to human upper respiratory tract epithelium than avian influenza viruses. The American journal of pathology, 176(4), 1614-8. PMID: 20167867  

Loregian A, Mercorelli B, Nannetti G, Compagnin C, & Palù G. (2014) Antiviral strategies against influenza virus: towards new therapeutic approaches. Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS. PMID: 24699705  

  • April 10, 2014
  • 03:40 PM
  • 123 views

April 10, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

When you host a party at your home, do you hire a caterer to bring in food or do you cook the food right there in your kitchen? One of these options leaves a lot more wiggle room for last-minute changes—a few extra guests, a gluten allergy, a pregnant lady with a disgust for wobbly deserts. A cell recognizes this distinction too. When making certain proteins, a cell will synthesize proteins where and when they’re needed. Today’s image is from Natasha Gutierrez, who recently published a........ Read more »

  • April 10, 2014
  • 10:44 AM
  • 121 views

Saturn’s hexagon: an amazing phenomenon

by Perikis Livas in Tracing Knowledge

Researchers at the Planetary Sciences Group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country reveal some of the secrets of Saturn’s mysterious hexagonal wave, including its rotation period, which could be that of the planet itself

News Release April 8, 2014 University of the Basque Country... Read more »

Sánchez-Lavega, A., del Río-Gaztelurrutia, T., Hueso, R., Pérez-Hoyos, S., García-Melendo, E., Antuñano, A., Mendikoa, I., Rojas, J., Lillo, J., Barrado-Navascués, D.... (2014) The long-term steady motion of Saturn's hexagon and the stability of its enclosed jet stream under seasonal changes. Geophysical Research Letters, 41(5), 1425-1431. DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059078  

  • April 10, 2014
  • 09:54 AM
  • 108 views

Aluminum adjuvants in vaccines: are they safe?

by EE Giorgi in CHIMERAS

Multnomah Falls, © EEGDisclaimer: I work on HIV vaccine design and I'm quite proud of it. I know that for three million HIV-positive kids in Africa, a vaccine is the only hope they have to grow into adulthood. So, when people tell me that vaccines are bad I cringe. Infant mortality rates have dropped since vaccinations have been introduced. We live longer, healthier lives thanks to vaccines. Diseases like polio can paralyze and kill, yet they are no longer a concern for children in the western ........ Read more »

  • April 10, 2014
  • 09:25 AM
  • 84 views

Silver Nanoparticles Help Solar Cells Absorb More Light

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Nanostructures could enable more light to be directed into the active layer of solar cells, increasing their efficiency.... Read more »

  • April 10, 2014
  • 09:14 AM
  • 148 views

What’s The Answer? (1000 Genomes signatures)

by Mary in OpenHelix

BioStar is a site for asking, answering and discussing bioinformatics questions and issues. We are members of the community and find it very useful. Often questions and answers arise at BioStar that are germane to our readers (end users of genomics resources). Every Thursday we will be highlighting one of those items or discussions here […]... Read more »

Pybus M., Dall'Olio G. M., Luisi P., Uzkudun M., Carreno-Torres A., Pavlidis P., Laayouni H., Bertranpetit J., & Engelken J. (2013) 1000 Genomes Selection Browser 1.0: a genome browser dedicated to signatures of natural selection in modern humans. Nucleic Acids Research, 42(D1). DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkt1188  

  • April 10, 2014
  • 08:54 AM
  • 162 views

How plants become zombies

by Perikis Livas in Tracing Knowledge

Forget popular video game Plants Vs. Zombies, some plants are zombies and scientists have uncovered how bacterial parasites turn them into the living dead.
News Release APRIL 8, 2014 John Innes Centre... Read more »

  • April 10, 2014
  • 06:38 AM
  • 135 views

Study Tests Theory that Life Originated at Deep Sea Vents

by Perikis Livas in Tracing Knowledge

One of the greatest mysteries facing humans is how life originated on Earth. Scientists have determined approximately when life began (roughly 3.8 billion years ago), but there is still intense debate about exactly how life began. One possibility has grown in popularity in the last two decades – that simple metabolic reactions emerged near ancient seafloor hot springs, enabling the leap from a non-living to a living world.

News Release April 9, 2014 Media Relations Office Woods Hole Oce........ Read more »

Reeves EP, McDermott JM, & Seewald JS. (2014) The origin of methanethiol in midocean ridge hydrothermal fluids. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 24706901  

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