Post List

  • November 12, 2014
  • 01:11 PM
  • 115 views

Do Rats Have Free Will?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

New research on the neural basis of ‘spontaneous’ actions in rats could shed light on the philosophical mystery that is human ‘free will’. The study, just published in Nature Neuroscience, is called Neural antecedents of self-initiated actions in secondary motor cortex. It’s from researchers Masayoshi Murakami and colleagues of Portugal’s excellently-named Champalimaud Centre for the […]The post Do Rats Have Free Will? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Murakami M, Vicente MI, Costa GM, & Mainen ZF. (2014) Neural antecedents of self-initiated actions in secondary motor cortex. Nature neuroscience, 17(11), 1574-82. PMID: 25262496  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 11:14 AM
  • 100 views

Binge Eating Linked to Risk for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Binge eating is defined as the recurrent rapid consumption of high calorie meals accompanied by a feeling that eating is out of control.Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating paired with a purging behavior such as self-induced vomiting.Binge eating without purging is receiving increased clinical and research attention.Binge eating is a relative common component in elevated body mass index and obesity. Successful behavior and drug treatment for obesity often includes ........ Read more »

Peat CM, Huang L, Thornton LM, Von Holle AF, Trace SE, Lichtenstein P, Pedersen NL, Overby DW, & Bulik CM. (2013) Binge eating, body mass index, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Journal of psychosomatic research, 75(5), 456-61. PMID: 24182635  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 09:19 AM
  • 96 views

On The Road: Mobility of Romans in Britains

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

The remains of the Roman Empire are found throughout Europe, Africa and the Middle East- aqueducts, stadiums, roads, temples, and cemeteries dot the modern landscapes of many European countries. Their […]... Read more »

Eckardt, H., Müldner, G., & Lewis, M. (2014) People on the move in Roman Britain. World Archaeology, 46(4), 534-550. DOI: 10.1080/00438243.2014.931821  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 09:19 AM
  • 90 views

Human Rights in the End-to-End Supply Chain

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

“Certification programs have their merits and their limitations. With the growing availability of social media, analytics tools, and supply chain data, a smarter set of solutions could soon be possible”, as Robert Handfield and I argue in our paper, just published in Supply Chain Management Review. We believe that an evolution from company thinking to […]... Read more »

Wieland, A., & Handfield, R.B. (2014) The Challenge of Ensuring Human Rights in the End-to-End Supply Chain. Supply Chain Management Review, 18(6), 49-51. info:/

  • November 12, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 88 views

Should Pets be Included in Emergency Planning?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

And can they help vulnerable people be more resilient?Photo: Nika Art / ShutterstockA new paper by Thompson et al (2014) in Australia considers how pets can be incorporated into planning for emergencies such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes and forest fires. It can quite literally be a matter of life and death. For example, they say, “over 8% of flood-related fatalities in Australia from 1788 to September 1996 resulted from people’s attempts to save ‘stock, property or pets’ – even w........ Read more »

Lem, M.,, Coe, J.B.,, Haley, D.B.,, Stone, E.,, & O'Grady, W. (2013) Effects of companion animal ownership among Canadian street-involved youth: A qualitative analysis. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 40(4), 285-304. info:/

  • November 12, 2014
  • 08:08 AM
  • 90 views

Video Tip of the Week: UpSet about genomics Venn Diagrams?

by Mary in OpenHelix

Who can forget the Banana Venn? It was one of the most talked-about visualizations in genomics that I’m aware of. A new concept in data visualization: the Venn/banana diagram. MT @phylogenomics http://t.co/xjitNDNl — Iddo Friedberg (@iddux) July 19, 2012 Banana? RT @phylogenomics: Perhaps the best genomics Venn diagram ever #Bananas #NotSureWhatItMeansButDontCare http://t.co/xMV25GBG — Brian Kent […]... Read more »

D’Hont Angélique, Jean-Marc Aury, Franc-Christophe Baurens, Françoise Carreel, Olivier Garsmeur, Benjamin Noel, Stéphanie Bocs, Gaëtan Droc, Mathieu Rouard, & Corinne Da Silva. (2012) The banana (Musa acuminata) genome and the evolution of monocotyledonous plants. Nature, 488(7410), 213-217. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11241  

Lex Alexander , Gehlenborg Nils , Strobelt Hendrik , Vuillemot Romain Vuillemot, & Pfister Hanspeter . (2014) UpSet: Visualization of Intersecting Sets. IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics (InfoVis '14). info:other/TBD

Gibbs Richard A., Michael L. Metzker, Donna M. Muzny, Erica J. Sodergren, Steven Scherer, Graham Scott, David Steffen, Kim C. Worley, Paula E. Burch, & Geoffrey Okwuonu. (2004) Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution. Nature, 428(6982), 493-521. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02426  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 77 views

A Goat For Thanksgiving

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

The cornucopia is a symbol for unending bounty, and has become a synonym for Thanksgiving in the US. But what if we investigate this further; the goat should be the real symbol for Thanksgiving. It spawned the horn of plenty in Greek mythology, it represents a dairy and meat source that the pilgrims made use of. And as far as a sustainable source of red meat, its tops. Goat – the other green meat!... Read more »

Liu YT, Sun J, Luo ZY, Rao SQ, Su YJ, Xu RR, & Yang YJ. (2012) Chemical composition of five wild edible mushrooms collected from Southwest China and their antihyperglycemic and antioxidant activity. Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 50(5), 1238-44. PMID: 22300772  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 76 views

Non-citizen? Undocumented? Watch out for jury sentencing!

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

You are likely familiar with the fact that African-Americans and Hispanics often receive harsher sentences than do White defendants. So where do you think the undocumented immigrant or non-citizen would fall in that lineup? The undocumented receive the harshest sentences and non-citizens (who are in the country legally) come in second. Why? The authors of […]

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Go to jail. Go directly to jail. And if you are a woma........ Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 06:40 AM
  • 100 views

Loneliness is a disease that changes the brain's structure and function

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Loneliness increases the risk of poor sleep, higher blood pressure, cognitive and immune decline, depression, and ultimately an earlier death. Why? The traditional explanation is that lonely people lack life’s advisors: people who encourage healthy behaviours and curb unhealthy ones. If so, we should invest in pamphlets, adverts and GP advice: ignorance is the true disease, loneliness just a symptom.But this can’t be the full story. Introverts with small networks aren’t at especial health ........ Read more »

Cacioppo, S., Capitanio, J., & Cacioppo, J. (2014) Toward a neurology of loneliness. Psychological Bulletin, 140(6), 1464-1504. DOI: 10.1037/a0037618  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 06:27 AM
  • 66 views

November 12, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

You might think that the “kiss-and-hop” is a dance move strictly forbidden at a Duggar homeschool prom, but it refers to the quick dynamics of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Today’s image is from a paper describing unexpected results about how tau resides on and regulate microtubules without physically impeding microtubule motors. The microtubule-associate protein tau binds to and stabilizes the microtubules within an axon. As most tau is believed to decorate axonal microtu........ Read more »

Janning, D., Igaev, M., Sundermann, F., Bruhmann, J., Beutel, O., Heinisch, J., Bakota, L., Piehler, J., Junge, W., & Brandt, R. (2014) Single-molecule tracking of tau reveals fast kiss-and-hop interaction with microtubules in living neurons. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 25(22), 3541-3551. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E14-06-1099  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 06:26 AM
  • 78 views

Organic solar cells are heating up!

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

A new processing method with a novel donor materials allows for more material combinations for high PV efficiency in organic solar cells!... Read more »

Liu Yuhang, Zhao Jingbo, Li Zhengke, Mu Cheng, Ma Wei, Hu Huawei, Jiang Kui, Lin Haoran, Ade Harald, & Yan He. (2014) Aggregation and morphology control enables multiple cases of high-efficiency polymer solar cells. Nature communications. PMID: 25382026  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 05:40 AM
  • 71 views

Optical Illusion: Can You See Vase And Faces Simultanuously?

by RAZ Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

The vase-face optical illusion is an ambiguous bi-stable image, that has been used in perceptual experiments for years. What can these images teach us about the brain?... Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 04:53 AM
  • 75 views

An inflammatory autism subtype?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper from Hiram Jyonouchi and colleagues [1] (open-access) continues a theme from this author with their suggestion of "an imbalance in the production of inflammatory (IL-1ß and IL-6) and counterregulatory (IL-10) cytokines by ‘flare’ ASD-IS [autism spectrum disorder - inflammatory subtype] monocytes".Panic on the streets of Birmingham...'Flare' ASD-IS in this case refers to a coding given to a small participant group (n=24) who were: "defined as those with a history of ........ Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 63 views

Patellar Autograft May be Better to Avoid Revision

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A patient with a patellar autograft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has less of a chance of a need for ACL revision surgery than patients receiving a hamstring autograft. ... Read more »

  • November 11, 2014
  • 09:34 PM
  • 275 views

Video Gaming and Internet Addiction : Harmful or Harmless?

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

The more the addiction to video games, Internet and social media is increased among teenagers and young adults, the more concerned the parents become. It is where family therapists play an important role. Are video games really bad for children? How to counter addiction to social media? Researchers explored the impact for these new forms of entertainment to assist family therapists.

When researchers compared two groups of players who played massive multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORP........ Read more »

  • November 11, 2014
  • 02:03 PM
  • 77 views

Some Plants can regenerate by DNA duplication

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

When munched by grazing animals (or mauled by scientists in the lab), some herbaceous plants overcompensate – producing more plant matter and becoming more fertile than they otherwise would. Scientists say they now know how these plants accomplish this feat of regeneration.... Read more »

  • November 11, 2014
  • 11:55 AM
  • 96 views

Recovering from an Eating Disorder in a Society that Loves Fat Shaming (and Dieting)

by Tetyana in Science of Eating Disorders


Is ED recovery easier when your body is “normative or stereotypically desirable”? The anon asking the question implied that recovery could be more difficult because “an obese person … will never stop hearing hearing extremely triggering stuff about their body type.” Anon asked, “Have there been any studies on this?” Andrea tackled this question in her last post (it might be helpful to read it first if you haven’t yet); in this post, I........ Read more »

Bulik, C.M., Marcus, M.D., Zerwas, S., Levine, M.D., & La Via, M. (2012) The changing "weightscape" of bulimia nervosa. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 169(10), 1031-6. PMID: 23032383  

McKisack, C., & Waller, G. (1997) Factors influencing the of group psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 22(1), 1-13. PMID: 9140730  

  • November 11, 2014
  • 11:54 AM
  • 69 views

Recovering from an Eating Disorder in a Society that Loves Fat Shaming (and Dieting)

by Tetyana in Science of Eating Disorders

Is ED recovery easier when your body is “normative or stereotypically desirable”? The anon asking the question implied that recovery could be more difficult because “an obese person … will never stop hearing hearing extremely triggering stuff about their body type.” Anon asked, “Have there been any studies on this?” Andrea tackled this question in her last post (it might be helpful to read it first if you haven’t yet); in this post, I will expand ........ Read more »

Bulik, C.M., Marcus, M.D., Zerwas, S., Levine, M.D., & La Via, M. (2012) The changing "weightscape" of bulimia nervosa. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 169(10), 1031-6. PMID: 23032383  

McKisack, C., & Waller, G. (1997) Factors influencing the of group psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 22(1), 1-13. PMID: 9140730  

  • November 11, 2014
  • 11:13 AM
  • 85 views

Anorexia Nervosa: Brain Connectivity Abnormalities

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Functional magnetic resonance imaging is providing a new tool for understanding brain circuitry in normal brain development and in brain disorders. Anorexia nervosa is an restrictive calorie eating disorder often resistant to treatment.No effective drug treatment for anorexia nervosa currently exists and psychotherapy is often only partially effective. A better understanding of the brain pathophysiology in anorexia nervosa is needed to aid in treatment development.Stephanie Kullman along wi........ Read more »

  • November 11, 2014
  • 10:50 AM
  • 87 views

A Four Billion Mile Road Trip to Grandma’s

by Mark Lasbury in The 'Scope

Mankind is about to take a huge step in understanding himself and his universe. The Rosetta orbiter has traveled 3.8 billion miles to catch comet 67P/C-G. Traveling at more than 24,000 miles per hour, the Philae Lander is now going to land on the comet. A visitor from deep space and from deep time, 67P/C-G contains clues about the solar system, water, and perhaps life itself.... Read more »

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