Post List

  • April 9, 2014
  • 08:10 AM
  • 104 views

Capsaicin – Adding To Or Taking Your Pain

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Activation of TRPV1 ion channels can lead to potentiation of noxious stimuli while activation of multiple nociceptors can result in sensitization of TRPV1. Both situations can lead to hyperalgesia or allodynia. New research is highlighting the role of TRPV1 in burning mouth syndrome, both in its hyperalgesic and allodynic symptoms, as well as in its treatment. ... Read more »

Borsani E, Majorana A, Cocchi MA, Conti G, Bonadeo S, Padovani A, Lauria G, Bardellini E, Rezzani R, & Rodella LF. (2013) Epithelial expression of vanilloid and cannabinoid receptors: a potential role in burning mouth syndrome pathogenesis. Histology and histopathology. PMID: 24190005  

Silvestre FJ, Silvestre-Rangil J, Tamarit-Santafé C, & Bautista D. (2012) Application of a capsaicin rinse in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome. Medicina oral, patologia oral y cirugia bucal, 17(1). PMID: 21743415  

Alpizar YA, Boonen B, Gees M, Sanchez A, Nilius B, Voets T, & Talavera K. (2014) Allyl isothiocyanate sensitizes TRPV1 to heat stimulation. Pflugers Archiv : European journal of physiology, 466(3), 507-15. PMID: 23955021  

  • April 9, 2014
  • 08:01 AM
  • 71 views

From Quark Soup to Matter

by Perikis Livas in Tracing Knowledge

Tracking the Transition of Early-Universe Quark Soup to Matter-as-we-know-it

New evidence from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider reveals different kinds of phase changes at different collision energies... Read more »

STAR Collaboration, L. Adamczyk, J. K. Adkins, G. Agakishiev, M. M. Aggarwal, Z. Ahammed, I. Alekseev, J. Alford, C. D. Anson, A. Aparin.... (2014) Beam-Energy Dependence of Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons and Pions in Au Au Collisions. Cornell University Library. arXiv: 1401.3043v2

  • April 9, 2014
  • 07:56 AM
  • 85 views

Making An Injured Central Nervous System Grow Again

by Patricia Pedro in United Academics

Most researchers and clinicians think that making axons re-grow is an impossible task. But injecting a molecule named PCAF offers hope, as new research shows.... Read more »

Puttagunta R, Tedeschi A, Sória MG, Hervera A, Lindner R, Rathore KI, Gaub P, Joshi Y, Nguyen T, Schmandke A.... (2014) PCAF-dependent epigenetic changes promote axonal regeneration in the central nervous system. Nature communications, 3527. PMID: 24686445  

  • April 9, 2014
  • 07:51 AM
  • 58 views

Do As I Do: Copy Cat Social Imitation in Dog Training

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Join us for another guest post, this time from Claudia Fugazza of the Family Dog Project in Budapest. Claudia's here to discuss her recent publication in Applied Animal Behaviour Science on the efficiency of new methods in dog training.Hi Mia and Julie,Formal training methods used until now rely mainly on the well-known rules of individual associative learning. These methods work perfectly well for a very wide range of animals — pigeons, rats, dogs and even crabs — and human and non-human an........ Read more »

  • April 9, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 60 views

Too trusting? You are likely also cursed with intelligence and good judgment!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We often associate people who are especially trusting with gullibility, low self-esteem, and lower intellectual function. However, we seem to have it backwards according to new research (which successfully replicates the results of studies from 2010 and 2012).  Intelligent people are more likely to trust others while those lower in intelligence are less likely to […]

Related posts:
How ‘myside bias’ is related to your intelligence
“Just about always” and “Never” responses to ........ Read more »

  • April 9, 2014
  • 06:33 AM
  • 63 views

What is Ebola? Why is it scary? A really simple answer

by Stuart Farrimond in Dr Stu's Science Blog

“Ebola Virus outbreak” is a headline that produces terror. Well, it should… but I’m not sure that it does. There’s been an outbreak of Ebola in Guinea and Liberia in West Africa, but how many of us actually know what Ebola is – let alone why it is so scary? A quick poll of friends … Continue reading →... Read more »

Bwaka, M., Bonnet, M., Calain, P., Colebunders, R., De Roo, A., Guimard, Y., Katwiki, K., Kibadi, K., Kipasa, M., Kuvula, K.... (1999) Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo: Clinical Observations in 103 Patients. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 179(s1). DOI: 10.1086/514308  

  • April 8, 2014
  • 09:03 PM
  • 57 views

An unexpected actor: role of arid environments in terrestrial carbon uptake

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

A new 10-year study has found an unexpected terrestrial carbon sink in the Mojave desert!... Read more »

Evans, R., Koyama, A., Sonderegger, D., Charlet, T., Newingham, B., Fenstermaker, L., Harlow, B., Jin, V., Ogle, K., Smith, S.... (2014) Greater ecosystem carbon in the Mojave Desert after ten years exposure to elevated CO2. Nature Climate Change. DOI: 10.1038/nclimate2184  

  • April 8, 2014
  • 06:53 PM
  • 67 views

Tibial Accelerations in Heel and Forefoot Strikers

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Tibial Accelerations in Heel and Forefoot Strikers... Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 02:52 PM
  • 60 views

Gold Coating to Reduce Glare From Solar Panels

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A new work by UC Irvine scientists could reduce glare from solar panels and electronic displays and dull dangerous glints on military weapons.... Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 59 views

Photographic analysis of a Shabe Yoruba burial

by JB in Bone Broke

When you’re one of the only bioarchaeology grad students in a department with few other osteologists, almost anything involving human remains will eventually make its way across your desk. After getting back to the museum in early September, fellow graduate student Andrew Gurstelle told me that he had come across a burial this past summer, and asked me whether I would mind taking a look at it if I had the time. I was initially extremely excited because I thought this would involve hands-o........ Read more »

İşcan, M., & Miller-Shaivitz, P. (1984) Determination of sex from the tibia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 64(1), 53-57. DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.1330640104  

  • April 8, 2014
  • 01:34 PM
  • 37 views

The Lure of the Ring—A Chloride Ion Channel Gene Makes a Surprise Appearance in Ciliogenesis

by John Fleischman in ASCB Post

Basic—and unexpected—discoveries about the primary cilium are still being made. In the latest issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell, Chelsey Chandler Ruppersburg and H. Criss Hartzell of Emory University report that ANO1 (also known as Tmem16A), a gene encoding a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) known to be involved in epithelial fluid secretion, has a unsuspected secret life early in the interphase of the cell cycle. ... Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 11:45 AM
  • 77 views

Scientists Like Some Animals Better than Others (Hint: Bears)

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

In the fight for attention from researchers, there are winners and there are civets. That’s what researchers found when they analyzed almost 16,500 published papers about animals from walruses to weasels. They saw clear trends in which animals are the most popular to study. And it matters because the most popular animals aren’t necessarily the […]The post Scientists Like Some Animals Better than Others (Hint: Bears) appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 11:05 AM
  • 79 views

Information theory of behavior

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Biology can tell us what but theory tells us why. There is a new issue of Current Opinion in Neurobiology that focuses on the theory and computation in neuroscience. There’s tons of great stuff there, from learning and memory to the meaning of a spike to the structure of circuitry. I have an article in this issue and […]... Read more »

Sharpee, T., Calhoun, A., & Chalasani, S. (2014) Information theory of adaptation in neurons, behavior, and mood. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 47-53. DOI: 10.1016/j.conb.2013.11.007  

  • April 8, 2014
  • 10:00 AM
  • 7 views

The story of the phospholipase A superfamily

by Clay Clark in Biochem Blogs

  The phospholipase A2 superfamily is a group of enzymes that cleave fatty acid groups from glycerol, in particular acyl groups at the sn-2 position. They contribute to numerous metabolic processes and diseases, including Alzheimer, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis; making this group of proteins very attractive to study. This superfamily includes groups such as secreted, […]... Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 09:37 AM
  • 78 views

Researchers Use Sun to Make Solar Energy Materials

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered a way to tap the sun not only as a source of power, but also to directly produce the solar energy materials that make this possible.... Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 08:11 AM
  • 66 views

Co-circulation of viruses between apes and humans in Africa

by socgenmicro in Microbe Post

On 21 July 1969, Neil Armstrong made mankind’s most famous leap, when he opened the Eagle’s hatch and stepped down onto the lunar surface. Hundreds of thousands of miles away in Ghana, something else happened in 1969 that you may … Continue reading →... Read more »

Harvala H, Van Nguyen D, McIntyre C, Ahuka-Mundeke S, Ngole EM, Delaporte E, Peeters M, & Simmonds P. (2014) Co-circulation of enteroviruses between apes and humans. The Journal of General Virology, 95(Pt 2), 403-7. PMID: 24189620  

Oberste MS, Feeroz MM, Maher K, Nix WA, Engel GA, Hasan KM, Begum S, Oh G, Chowdhury AH, Pallansch MA.... (2013) Characterizing the picornavirus landscape among synanthropic nonhuman primates in Bangladesh, 2007 to 2008. Journal of Virology, 87(1), 558-71. PMID: 23097448  

  • April 8, 2014
  • 07:35 AM
  • 58 views

COFFEE VS. PARKINSON’S DISEASE – CAN CAFFEINE REDUCE THE RISK OF DEVELOPING THE DISEASE?

by Robb Hollis in Antisense Science

There are a number of genetic and environmental factors known to affect the development and progression of the disease, but the exact underlying cause of the neuronal degeneration is still largely unknown. Studies of Parkinson’s in families have revealed that genetic factors are likely to contribute to the development of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease in particular. The list of environmental factors associated with Parkinson’s is extensive, including increased risk with exposu........ Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 06:07 AM
  • 72 views

Knowing your grandmother

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

There is a spectrum of ways in which the brain may hold concepts that range from very localized to very distributed, and there is little agreement of where along that spectrum various concepts are held. At the one end is the ultimate local storage: a single ‘grandmother’ neuron that recognizes your grandmother in matter how […]... Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 05:19 AM
  • 64 views

Narcissistic CEOs: Are They Self-Serving Takers?

by Elisabeth Buhl Thubron in United Academics

Narcissism plays a key role in the excessive executive pay culture. What is the impact of having a narcissist at the head of a company?
... Read more »

  • April 8, 2014
  • 03:35 AM
  • 96 views

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and various factors

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Kate Lievesley and colleagues [1] documenting various "predisposing, precipitating and perpetuating factors in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in children and adolescents" caught my eye recently. Based on a review of the research literature around the topic of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) [in childhood], the authors set about detailing some of the important factors linked to the condition and in doing so, highlighted how physiology and psychology might combine when it........ Read more »

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