Post List

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,376 views

New GPCR Structure: Dopamine D3 Receptor

by Peter Nollert in Emerald BioStructures Blog

Yay – another GPCR structure to look at! I just noticed that the 2.9A Dopamine D3 Receptor (in complex with Eticlopride) coordinates 3PBL have been released by the PDB earlier this week. This one will take some time to digest. My congratulations go again to the Stevens lab at TSRI. This is a great achievement, well done.... Read more »

Chien, E., Liu, W., Zhao, Q., Katritch, V., Won Han, G., Hanson, M., Shi, L., Newman, A., Javitch, J., Cherezov, V.... (2010) Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist. Science, 330(6007), 1091-1095. DOI: 10.1126/science.1197410  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,758 views

Rethinking Circadian Clock Machinery

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Chronobiologists at Cambridge have discovered circadian rhythms in peroxide oxidation in HUMAN blood cells. That sounds cool, right? But what if I told you that this research will forever make us rethink the innerworkings of the circadian clock because this is the first documentation of non-transcriptionally driven circadian rhythms... Read more »

O'Neill JS, & Reddy AB. (2011) Circadian clocks in human red blood cells. Nature, 469(7331), 498-503. PMID: 21270888  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,925 views

Minding As and P: Can Arsenic Substitute for Phosphorus or Not?

by Sara Klink in Promega Connections

Back in December 2010, there was a press conference held by NASA to announce the discovery of a bacterium found in a high salt, high pH lake with high concentrations of arsenic that seemed to have substituted arsenic for phosphorus in the bacterium’s biomolecules. This set off a wave of response in the blogosphere regarding what Felisa Wolfe-Simon and her team did nor did not do to confirm arsenic was incorporated into DNA molecules. Controversy ranged from the ability of arsenic to form a sta........ Read more »

Wolfe-Simon, F., Blum, J., Kulp, T., Gordon, G., Hoeft, S., Pett-Ridge, J., Stolz, J., Webb, S., Weber, P., Davies, P.... (2011) Response to Comments on "A Bacterium That Can Grow Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus". Science. DOI: 10.1126/science.1202098  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,163 views

Synthesising Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

The paper describes how “in the past most stores were able to sell pseudoephedrine”, the US’s most popular decongestant but new laws require pharmacies, often with restricted opening hours to sell the medicine only to those carrying government issued ID. The paper argues that “it would be of great interest to have a simple synthesis of pseudoephedrine from reagents which can be more readily procured”. The study is published in the splendidly titled Journal of Apocry........ Read more »

Hai, O. Hakkenshit, I.B. (2012) A Simple and Convenient Synthesis of Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine. Journal of Apocryphal Chemistry, 213-21. info:/1F.1BC9/b00000F00A

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,010 views

Robot Reveals the Inner Workings of Brain Cells

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Gaining access to the inner workings of a neuron in the living brain offers a wealth of useful information: its patterns of electrical activity, its shape, even a profile of which genes are turned on at a given moment. However, achieving this entry is such a painstaking task that it is considered an art form; it is so difficult to learn that only a small number of labs in the world practice it.... Read more »

Kodandaramaiah, S., Franzesi, G., Chow, B., Boyden, E., & Forest, C. (2012) Automated whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology of neurons in vivo. Nature Methods. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.1993  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,974 views

The Secret Feeding of Some Active Galaxies' Supermassive Black Holes--Uncovered

by Brooke N in Smaller Questions

New studies in high-energy astronomy have shown that there are many more galaxies with central supermassive black holes that are actively accreting material. In a new gamma-ray survey, about 24% of the active galaxies were not previously known to have active black hole accretion, as they did not show up in lower-energy observations.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,050 views

How to spot exo-Earths...

by Invader Xan in Supernova Condensate

It seems like we’re not going to stop discovering new exoplanets anytime soon. Around one sixth of all exoplanets currently known can be observed transiting their star’s disk. Given that transits are precisely what NASA’s Kepler mission is going to spend the next three years looking for, that number is certainly set to increase over the coming months. But with exoplanet transits comes a unique opportunity to study them…... Read more »

Pallé, E., Osorio, M., Barrena, R., Montañés-Rodríguez, P., & Martín, E. (2009) Earth’s transmission spectrum from lunar eclipse observations. Nature, 459(7248), 814-816. DOI: 10.1038/nature08050  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,674 views

I Dream of Health

by Anton Power in BioMed Weekly

... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,779 views

Tadpoles see through their asses

by Papes in Sick Papes

A compelling example of the brain’s dynamic ballsiness (i.e., the ability of neural circuits to learn to detect unfamiliar sensory stimuli), is described in a recent exercise in sickness by the duo of Blackiston and Levin. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,848 views

How to get max protein from E.coli

by Dave Dilyx in Protein Solubility Blog

Bacterium E. coli is the working horse of protein expression, and a rare biotechnologist knows about it more than the basic stuff like "grow at 37°C". This approach is fine if you don't have any problems expressing your protein, but if the target protein aggregates irreversibly in certain conditions or you have to rapidly screen for solubility conditions, you are left with an insolvable puzzle. Bacterial physiology may be not cool anymore, but knowing just a little more about ........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,601 views

Could fracking actually save us water?

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

A new study in Environmental Research Letters indicates that hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, may save water compared to conventional electricity generation.... Read more »

Bridget R Scanlon, Ian Duncan and Robert C Reedy. (2013) Drought and the water-energy nexus in Texas. Environmental Research Letters. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/8/4/045033  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,826 views

Regenerating the aged thymus

by Caroline Hendry in the Node

The latest issue of Development includes a paper by Clare Blackburn and colleagues at the Medical Research Council Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, showing that the aged mouse thymus can be regenerated in vivo by the upregulation of a single transcription factor, FOXN1.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,262 views

Rerouting Ships Can Save Billions for Offshore Wind

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Rerouting ships to open up areas for offshore wind development could save billions of dollars in construction and operating costs for the renewable energy source, according to new findings by the University of Delaware’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment (CEOE).... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,848 views

Honeypot Ants - Live food storage units

by beredim in Strange Animals

Honey ants are a weird class of ant-workers that engorge themselves with food. Overtime, their abdomen gets as big as a grape. In times of need, they will either regurgitate the stored liquid or sacrifice themselves to feed the rest of the colony. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,682 views

Electron-spin clue to solving general anesthesia mystery

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

New study on fruit flies suggests general anesthetics can affect electron-spin properties... Read more »

Turin Luca, Skoulakis Efthimios, & Horsfield Andrew. (2014) Electron spin changes during general anesthesia in Drosophila. PNAS, Early edition(N/A). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404387111  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,995 views

The Australian Turtle Frog

by beredim in Strange Animals

The turtle frog is a strange animal from western australia. Named after their turtle-like body, the species feeds exclusively on termites.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,364 views

...How to Fix Science

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

(Part 2/2) However, we can fix science. [Infographic]... Read more »

Alberts, B., Kirschner, M., Tilghman, S., & Varmus, H. (2014) Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(16), 5773-5777. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404402111  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,092 views

Tit for tet: Tet3 regulates neuron activity through epigenetic changes

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

Tet3 regulates neuronal activity through epigenetic changes in the cells' DNA. It alters the speed and ease with which neurons communicate by altering the number of receptors at the synapse.... Read more »

Yu H, Su Y, Shin J, Zhong C, Guo JU, Weng YL, Gao F, Geschwind DH, Coppola G, Ming GL.... (2015) Tet3 regulates synaptic transmission and homeostatic plasticity via DNA oxidation and repair. Nature neuroscience, 18(6), 836-43. PMID: 25915473  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,032 views

Is Your Tech Working for You? Accuracy of Activity Trackers

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

A loot at two studies that investigate the effectiveness of activity trackers.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 715 views

Autonomous, soft robots

by vitul in Think, Ask and Resolve

A Harvard University team of researchers with expertise in various fields recently came together to develop the first entirely soft robots. ... Read more »

Wehner M, Truby RL, Fitzgerald DJ, Mosadegh B, Whitesides GM, Lewis JA, & Wood RJ. (2016) An integrated design and fabrication strategy for entirely soft, autonomous robots. Nature, 536(7617), 451-5. PMID: 27558065  

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