Post List

  • March 6, 2015
  • 05:01 PM
  • 7 views

People with anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder have similar brain abnormalities

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Imagine looking in the mirror and not seeing yourself. Imagine losing weight and seeing a lower number on the scale, but when looking in the mirror you are still just as fat. Suffering from anorexia or other body dysmorphic disorders live like that daily. They literally don’t see what you and I might see when we look at them. It’s not their fault and a new study suggests that people suffering from anorexia or body dysmorphic disorder have similar abnormalities in their brains that affect the........ Read more »

  • March 6, 2015
  • 12:00 PM
  • 6 views

Multimodal measures of brain connectivity: how much should they agree?

by Pierre Megevand in Neuroscience and Medicine

A study recently published in Frontiers in Neurology started an interesting discussion on Twitter. The paper, by Stephen Jones and colleagues from the Cleveland Clinic, tackled a seemingly simple question: do measures of cerebral connectivity derived from different modalities (functional MRI, intracranial EEG, or diffusion tensor imaging) give similar results? To make a long story short, the answer is not much, as the authors report in Frontiers in Neurology and as Ged Ridgway pointed out on Twi........ Read more »

  • March 6, 2015
  • 11:27 AM
  • 7 views

MRAM catches an STT

by Bryn Howells in Spin and Tonic

After a month long absence, Pick of the Week returns with a look at a fantastic commentary article on spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory...
The post MRAM catches an STT appeared first on Spin and Tonic.
... Read more »

Kent, A., & Worledge, D. (2015) A new spin on magnetic memories. Nature Nanotechnology, 10(3), 187-191. DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2015.24  

  • March 6, 2015
  • 10:06 AM
  • 14 views

The Women Who Stare at Babies

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



A drooling baby face is not equally exciting to everyone around it. A new study says that young women who like the idea of motherhood get more enjoyment than their peers from staring at infants' faces. But they don't love all of those chubby mugs equally. Even more than the baby-neutral, wannabe moms are biased toward the cutest ones.

Amanda Hahn is a researcher at the University of Glasgow's "Face Research Lab," directed by psychologists Lisa DeBruine and Benedict Jones. (On their websit... Read more »

  • March 6, 2015
  • 08:55 AM
  • 18 views

By age three, girls already show a preference for thin people

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

These days it's hard to avoid the message that thin is best. From advertising billboards to the Oscar red carpet, we are inundated with images of successful ultra-thin women.Past research has already shown that this ideal is filtering through to our children, even preschoolers. But before now, there has been little study of just how early pro-thin bias (and prejudice against fat people) appears, and how it develops with age.Jennifer Harriger tested 102 girls from the South Western US, aged betwe........ Read more »

  • March 6, 2015
  • 05:20 AM
  • 20 views

Hypovitaminosis D is frequent in Down's syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Hypovitaminosis D is very frequent in DS [Down's syndrome] subjects, in particular in presence of obesity and autoimmune diseases."That was the conclusion reached in the study by Stefano Stagi and colleagues [1] (open-access here) based on an analysis of their small participant group diagnosed with Down's syndrome looking at vitamin D status among other things. The comment about obesity potentially exacerbating vitamin D deficiency ties in well with another paper independent........ Read more »

Stagi S, Lapi E, Romano S, Bargiacchi S, Brambilla A, Giglio S, Seminara S, & de Martino M. (2015) Determinants of vitamin d levels in children and adolescents with down syndrome. International journal of endocrinology, 896758. PMID: 25685147  

  • March 5, 2015
  • 03:01 PM
  • 39 views

Was Neuroscience's Most Famous Amnesiac, "HM", A Victim of Medical Error?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

According to a new paper, one of neuroscience's most famous case-studies came about as a result of a serious medical blunder.

Henry Molaison (1926 - 2008), better known as HM, was an American man who developed a dramatic form of amnesia after receiving surgery that removed part of the temporal lobes of his brain. The 1953 operation was intended to treat HM's epilepsy, but it had the side effect of leaving him unable to form new memories.



The consequences of HM's surgery are well known ... Read more »

  • March 5, 2015
  • 02:18 PM
  • 35 views

Not “just” crazy – Some psychoses caused by autoimmunity

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Antibodies defend the body against bacterial, viral, and other invaders. But sometimes the body makes antibodies that attack healthy cells. In these cases, autoimmune disorders develop. Immune abnormalities in patients with psychosis have been recognized for over a century, but it has been only relatively recently that scientists have identified specific immune mechanisms that seem to directly produce symptoms of psychosis, including hallucinations and delusions. In other words, some forms of ps........ Read more »

  • March 5, 2015
  • 10:27 AM
  • 35 views

Free Personalized Text Messages Remind Patients To Take Medications

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Avinash Pandy, the study author, is a high school student who conducted this study under the guidance of his mentor, Niteesh K. Choudhry., M.D., Ph.D., executive director of the Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women’s … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Avinash Pandy. (2015) Free Personalized Text Messages Remind Patients To Take Medications. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 5, 2015
  • 10:11 AM
  • 34 views

Does Thinking About God Increase Our Willingness to Make Risky Decisions?

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Daniella Kupor and her colleagues at Stanford University have recently published the paper "Anticipating Divine Protection? Reminders of God Can Increase Nonmoral Risk Taking" which takes a new look at the link between invoking the name of God and risky behaviors. The researchers hypothesized that reminders of God may have opposite effects on varying types of risk-taking behavior. For example, risk-taking behavior that is deemed ‘immoral' such as taking sexual risks or chea........ Read more »

  • March 5, 2015
  • 10:05 AM
  • 30 views

Effective Surgical Checklists Require Culture of Safety

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: E. Patchen Dellinger, M.D. Professor of Surgery University of Washington Seattle, Washington Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Dellinger: We know from previous large studies that use of checklists … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, E. Patchen Dellinger, M.D., Professor of Surgery, University of Washington, & Seattle, Washingto. (2015) Effective Surgical Checklists Require Culture of Safety. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 5, 2015
  • 09:57 AM
  • 29 views

Troubling Increase In HIV Infections In MSM

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Lorena Espinoza Center for Disease Control MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Men who have sex with men remain the risk group most severely affected by HIV in the … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, Lorena Espinoza, & Center for Disease Control. (2015) Troubling Increase In HIV Infections In MSM. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 5, 2015
  • 09:49 AM
  • 28 views

Black MSM More Likely To Be HIV Positive

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Cyprian Wejnert Center For Disease Control MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Cyprian Wejnert: Men who have sex with men (MSM) remain the risk group most severely affected by HIV … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Cyprian Wejner. (2015) Black MSM More Likely To Be HIV Positive. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 5, 2015
  • 09:45 AM
  • 28 views

African American Women Less Likely To Achieve HIV Viral Suppression

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Ndidi Nwangwu-Ike Center Disease Control MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: CDC data has shown encouraging signs of a decrease in new HIV infections among black women in … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Ndidi Nwangwu-Ike. (2015) African American Women Less Likely To Achieve HIV Viral Suppression. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 5, 2015
  • 08:30 AM
  • 38 views

Biting Off More Than You Can Chew: The Science of Competitive Eating

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Matt Stonie recently consumed 182 slices of bacon in just 5 minutes, breaking a competitive eating record. How is this physiologically possible?... Read more »

Levine MS, Spencer G, Alavi A, & Metz DC. (2007) Competitive speed eating: truth and consequences. AJR. American journal of roentgenology, 189(3), 681-6. PMID: 17715117  

  • March 5, 2015
  • 07:52 AM
  • 13 views

The psychology of female serial killers

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

There is a mistaken cultural assumption, say Marissa Harrison and her colleagues, that women are, by their nature, incapable of being serial killers – defined here as murderers of three or more victims, spaced out with at least a week between killings.This misconception, the psychologists warn, is a "deadly mistake". They point out that one in six serial killers are female. Their crimes tend to go undetected for longer than their male counterparts, likely in part because "our culture is in den........ Read more »

Harrison, M., Murphy, E., Ho, L., Bowers, T., & Flaherty, C. (2015) Female serial killers in the United States: means, motives, and makings. The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry , 1-24. DOI: 10.1080/14789949.2015.1007516  

  • March 5, 2015
  • 06:39 AM
  • 41 views

Autism, heritability and 'proof of principle' genomic biomarkers

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

JAMA Psychiatry published a number of interesting articles recently, some of which have grabbed media headlines. "Autism is largely down to genes, twin study suggests" went the BBC headline covering the paper by Emma Colvert and colleagues [1] who, based on an analysis of twin pairs as part of TEDS (Twins Early Development Study), concluded that: "The liability to ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and a more broadly defined high-level autism trait phenotype in this large population-based ........ Read more »

Colvert, E., Tick, B., McEwen, F., Stewart, C., Curran, S., Woodhouse, E., Gillan, N., Hallett, V., Lietz, S., Garnett, T.... (2015) Heritability of Autism Spectrum Disorder in a UK Population-Based Twin Sample. JAMA Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.3028  

  • March 5, 2015
  • 04:49 AM
  • 36 views

Persistent hyperlactacidemia in cases of autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper from José Guevara-Campos and colleagues [1] (open-access can be downloaded here) is fodder for today's short post, and a topic that has not been seen on this blog for quite a while: hyperlactacidemia (elevated plasma lactate levels) and autism.Previous mentions of lactate and autism on this blog (see here and see here) were potentially pretty important; specifically, how elevated plasma lactate levels might (a) not be an unfamiliar finding for quite a few people on the autis........ Read more »

Guevara-Campos J, González-Guevara L, & Cauli O. (2015) Autism and Intellectual Disability Associated with Mitochondrial Disease and Hyperlactacidemia. International journal of molecular sciences, 16(2), 3870-3884. PMID: 25679448  

  • March 4, 2015
  • 08:48 PM
  • 32 views

Screening For Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms May Have Benefits and Harms

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Minna Johansson, PhD student Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Research Unit and Section for General Practice, Vänersborg, Sweden Medical Research: What is the background for … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, Minna Johansson, PhD student, & Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine. (2015) Screening For Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms May Have Benefits and Harms. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 4, 2015
  • 08:24 PM
  • 29 views

Strong Evidence HPV Vaccination Highly Effective Outside Trial Settings

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Marc Brisson Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Modeling and Health Economics of Infectious Disease Associate Professor, Université Laval Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Since 2007, 52 countries … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, Marc Brisson, & Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Modeling and Health. (2015) Strong Evidence HPV Vaccination Highly Effective Outside Trial Settings. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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